How to Train a Greyhound to Not Chase

How to Train a Greyhound to Not Chase
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-6 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

As you would expect, your Greyhound is lightning fast. In fact, he is so quick he makes you feel old and slow in everything you do. You can forgive that, of course, because he's your favorite canine companion and you couldn’t imagine life without him anymore. However, his love for running has recently developed into a passion for chasing. In fact, ol' Buddy doesn’t just like chasing people, but also pets and anything else that breathes.

Training your Greyhound not to chase will alleviate a number of concerns. Firstly, you won’t have to worry about them escaping and running off. Secondly, you may become a bit more popular with the neighbors who are fed up with your Greyhound chasing them and their children. It will also mean you can take Buddy to friends' and families' houses without scaring anyone.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Defining Tasks

Training your Greyhound not to chase is going to be challenging. They are sighthounds, naturally built for running and will look for any excuse to take off. However, there are also a number of things you can do to stop them chasing. Firstly, you can take some preventative measures. You can then channel their energy into something more productive. Finally, obedience commands will be used to bring Buddy back under your control.

If your Greyhound is a puppy then they should be at their most receptive and eager to please. This means you could see results in just a week or so. But if they are older, stubborn and have been chasing for years, then you may need up to six weeks. If you get training right you won’t have to worry about being dragged to the floor when Buddy sees something he likes the look of coming around the corner.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Getting Started

Before you start training, you will need a few items. A short training leash will be required. You may also want to invest in a body harness. This will increase your control while simultaneously reducing the strain on their neck. You will also need a deterrence collar for one of the methods below.

You don’t need to set aside time for training specifically. However, the more vigilant and present you can be, the more you can react and the quicker you may tackle the problem.

Once you have all that, just bring patience and a positive attitude, then work can begin!

arrow-up-icon

Top

The ‘Stop’ Method

Effective

0 Votes

Ribbon icon

Effective

0 Votes

Ribbon icon
1

Stand away

You’re going to teach your Greyhound to stop. That way whenever they start to chase, you can quickly bring them to a halt. Use this enough times and they will stop chasing altogether. So stand several feet away from them.

2

Traffic signal

Hold up a treat and your dog will probably start automatically coming towards you. As soon as they do, take a step forwards and hold your hand out like a 'stop' traffic signal. This quick movement towards them will automatically make them hesitate for a second.

3

‘Stop’

At the same time as the hand signal, issue a ‘stop’ command. You can use any word or phrase you like for this instruction. In fact, Greyhounds can learn hundreds of different commands.

4

Reward

As soon as they stop, even for a second, praise them and give them a tasty treat. Now practice this for a few minutes each day. However, make your dog wait there a little longer each time before you give the reward.

5

Application

Keep practicing until they associate the instruction with the stopping action. At this point, you can lose the gesture and just rely on the command. Now start using it whenever they give chase to anything. You can even start with a few tests in the yard with friends. Keep using the instruction and you will soon break the habit entirely.

The ‘Come’ Method

Effective

0 Votes

Ribbon icon

Effective

0 Votes

Ribbon icon
1

Lure

Throughout the day, call your Greyhound’s name and lure them over with a treat. Then when they come to you, hand over a tasty reward. Do this several times each day.

2

Leash

Now take your dog out on a long leash. Again call their name in a high-pitched voice and give them a treat when they come to you. You want to get them into a habit of staying close to your side. They will soon feel dependent on you and won’t want to stray too far.

3

Lose the leash

After several days of your Greyhound returning to you when on the leash, try losing the leash where other people and pets aren’t around. Pat your knees and call the dog's name to bring them back to you and then hand over a treat.

4

Be consistent

Now you just need to do this regularly for a number of weeks. Soon enough they will be in a habit of staying close to you and won’t want to chase things and run away from you.

5

Lose the treats

When you can see your Greyhound does stay close to your side, which may take longer for older dogs, you can then start phasing out the treats. By this point they will be in the habit and food incentives will no longer be needed.

The Temptation Removal Method

Least Recommended

2 Votes

Ribbon icon

Least Recommended

2 Votes

Ribbon icon
1

Long leash

The first thing to do is keep your Greyhound on a leash at all times in public. This will prevent them chasing anything until training has proven successful. You don’t want to risk injury to any other person or pet.

2

Tether

If they give chase to things in your yard then you may want to consider tethering them to something with a long rope or leash. Make sure they have enough space to roam around, but not so much that they can give chase. This should help remove the temptation altogether.

3

Deterrence collar

These can be bought from a range of online and local stores. Just hit the remote button whenever they start chasing and an unpleasant spray of citronella will be emitted. This should soon bring them to a stop and get them associating chasing with negative consequences.

4

Exercise

Buddy may be chasing because he's full of energy. So, give him an extra walk or throw a tennis ball for a few minutes each day. The short sprinting will quickly tire him out and ensure he doesn’t have the energy to chase anything else.

5

Avoid punishment

Greyhounds do not respond well to punishment. Instead, remain calm if they chase something. Punishment may only encourage them further, open the door to other problems, and push back the end result.

By James Barra

Published: 03/22/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

Have a question?

Training Questions and Answers

Dog nametag icon

Ted

Dog breed icon

Greyhound

Dog age icon

2 Years

Question icon

Question

Thumbs up icon

0 found helpful

Thumbs up icon

0 found helpful

I have had Ted 3 months. He is an ex racer. I got him as he was "cat tested". However he has attacked my cat and now she is really anxious and losing her spark. I feel really awful as I am now regretting having got him. Is there anything I can do? I dont want to rehome him if I can some how manage. But I understand that might be very difficult

Jan. 27, 2022

Ted's Owner

Expert avatar

Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

Recommendation ribbon

1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the videos I have linked below. How you train will mostly be based on the severity of pup's aggression toward the cats. Mild cat issue - teaching impulse control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWF2Ohik8iM Moderate cat issue - teaching impulse control using corrections and rewards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPIC3Jtn0E Severe cat issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with cats with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 Work on impulse control in general with pup, by teaching things that increase impulse control and calmness - such as a long, Place command around lots of distractions. Practicing the command until you get to the point where pup will stay on Place while yo u are working with the kitty in the same room. You can also back tie pup while they are on place - connecting a long leash attached to pup to something near the Place just in case pup were to try to get off Place before you could intervene. This keeps kitty safe while practicing and reinforces to pup that they can't get off the Place. The leash should be long enough that pup doesn't feel the leash while they are obediently staying on the Place because it has some slack in the leash. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Below are some other commands in general you can practice to help pup develop better impulse skill/self-control - impulse control takes practice for a dog to gain the ability to control himself. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Jan. 27, 2022

Dog nametag icon

Hope

Dog breed icon

Greyhound

Dog age icon

3 Months

Question icon

Question

Thumbs up icon

0 found helpful

Thumbs up icon

0 found helpful

Hi, I was wondering if the "stop" method explained on your website could be used to teach my greyhound to stop running when they lose control and might get hurt. Thank you in advance

Dec. 10, 2021

Hope's Owner

Expert avatar

Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

Recommendation ribbon

1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Giulia, You could use it for that purpose. I would purchase a 20 foot training leash and padded back clip harness, and practice on leash around distractions like other animals and people though because it will take a lot of practice for pup to be able to stop once running away quickly. For a greyhound, using a remote training collar with vibration might also be helpful, so that you can teach pup to respond to that sensation even when they are out of sight or voice range, and to make interrupting their fixation on what they are chasing more effective. I would also teach a solid Come in addition to Stop too. An Off-leash level Come and Stop are wonderful commands to teach. With a greyhound, I would still use leashes and fences due to their prey drive and speed though for normal daily activity. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Dec. 10, 2021


Training assistant
Need training help?

Learn more in the Wag! app

Five starsFive starsFive starsFive starsFive stars

43k+ reviews

Install


© 2022 Wag Labs, Inc. All rights reserved.