How to Train a Havanese to Not Bark

How to Train a Havanese to Not Bark
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon3-6 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

While no one can really claim that the Havanese is a "yappy" breed, at the same time, no one can call them a particularly quiet breed. If you have been blessed with one of the more vocal members of this breed, it can become overwhelming if you don't take the steps needed to train your furball to be quiet. One thing's for sure, your neighbors are certainly going to appreciate when your pup finally learns to stop barking all the time.

As part of your training program, you need to decide on a cue or command word. Among the most commonly used are "quiet" and "that's enough" It really doesn’t matter what you use as long as you stick to using the same one all the time. This helps your pup to associate a single command with a very specific behavior. 

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Defining Tasks

Your task, provided you make the decision to partake in it, is to teach your fuzzball that he does not need to bark constantly and that while there are a few times when it is okay, most of the time he needs to be quiet. Sounds easy enough, right? If you are willing to put in the time and effort needed to work with your pup on mastering this very important skill, chances are good that he will pick up what is expected of him and be all too ready to please you by doing his best to be quiet.

One thing you should work on teaching your pup before you start training him to be quiet, is to 'speak' on command. Also, use positive reinforcement methods of training, they will always work if you stick with them. Using punishment or yelling at your pooch will do more harm than good. 

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Getting Started

Unlike many other tricks or behaviors you will teach your pup over the course of time, this one does not need much in the way of supplies. In all reality, all you need is a healthy supply of the following: your pup's favorite treats, time, and patience. Your Havanese is very intelligent and ready to learn. Take advantage of this and teach your pup to be quiet, along with several other important behaviors. 

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The Too Tired to Bark Method

Most Recommended

3 Votes

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Most Recommended

3 Votes

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1

Pocket some treats

Fill your pocket with a handful of your pup's favorite treats.

2

Did you say something to me?

When your pup gets it into his head to start barking, pay him no heed, just keep a close eye on him.

3

Too tired

At some point your pup is going to become too tired to keep up the noise. When he stops making all that noise, praise him and give him a treat. This will help him connect getting something good with not barking.

4

Time to use your words

Now that he has the idea he gets treats when he stops barking, it's time to add in the cue word. Each time he stops barking, give him the command "Quiet" and then praise him and give him a treat.

5

Move up the cue

When your pooch has made the association between your 'quiet' cue and the sound of silence, start giving the cue while he's still actively barking.

6

The long and winding road

The rest is all about spending as much time as you can working with your pup on stretching out the time between stopping and being rewarded. In time, he will simply not bark unless there is a very good reason.

The I Don't Know You Method

Effective

1 Vote

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Effective

1 Vote

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1

Treats 'R Us

Stuff your pocket full of your pup's favorite treats you can use to reward your pup for good behavior.

2

Hang out together

Take a little time out of your busy day and spend it hanging out with your fuzzball. Take him to one of the areas that tend to send him off on a barking fit.

3

Who is this noisy creature?

Once he starts barking, turn away from him and pretend that you have no idea who he is. Do this every time he starts barking. This will help him associate barking with being ignored.

4

Who, me?

When your dog finally stops barking and looks at you with a slightly guilty look on his face, praise him and give him a nice treat.

5

Putting it all together

For the next few weeks keep working on this training, slowly increasing the time between his stopping barking and when he gets his treats. In time, the urge to bark will slowly fade away and your pup will reserve it for when there is a very good reason for him to raise a ruckus.

The Talk to Me Method

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1 Vote

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Least Recommended

1 Vote

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1

'Speak' first

For this method, it's helpful if you've already taught your pooch to bark on cue.

2

To me

Choose a spot to work in, one where your pup tends to bark a lot if he hasn't mastered barking on command, and call your pup over.

3

Talk to me

Give your pup the 'speak' command and let him have a few seconds in which to voice his opinion. Then give him the 'quiet' command.

4

Wait for it

It might take a few minutes at first for your pup to stop barking, but when he does, be sure to immediately praise him and give him a tasty treat.

5

More time, if you please

Now that your pup understands he gets an immediate reward for not barking, it's time to start adding time in small increments between when he stops barking and when you give him the treat.

6

Make it work

The rest is all about spending as much time as you can working with your pup until he finally comes to understand that the only time he gets praise or treats is when he is being quiet. Before long, he will figure it out and you should have no more crazy barking furry frenzy.

By PB Getz

Published: 03/09/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Murphy

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Havashu

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9 Weeks

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Question

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Murphy barks constantly. Never stops. It’s a high yip. No matter what we do. He’s very hyper. He doesn’t walk he bounces and nips at us all the time. Is this normal?

May 7, 2020

Murphy's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sherri, Puppies, like adult dogs, have different personalities - some puppies are calmer and quieter, and some are more demanding or excitable. It sounds like you just got a puppy with a stronger personality. Biting and barking are both normal for puppies - especially if they receive any form of attention for it - like being fed when they bark. That doesn't mean you don't teach pup the habits that you want though, just that you don't have to feel discouraged that pup needs extra guidance, and know that certain things will need to be started sooner with your puppy, than with other personalities - like teaching Quiet. Check out the free PDF e-book linked below - pay special attention to sections on teaching chew toy training, crate training, and mentally exercising pup; www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Also, check out the article linked below and go ahead and start the Quiet and Desensitize and chew toy methods with pup early. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Finally, check out the videos linked below of a puppy class. I suggest following along with your pup to help wear pup out daily, teach pup commands so that pup is easier to manage, and help pup develop trust and respect for you early. This class took place over the course of 6 weeks - practicing each week's lesson for a full week before progressing, to help pup keep up. Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

May 7, 2020

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Joy

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Havanese

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5 Months

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Our puppy only barks when she wants us to stop and play. We do the ignore and tired method at home, but in public, we need a faster result and therefore respond right away to quiet her. Doesn't this send mixed messages? How do we stop her in those situations while continuing her training at home?

Feb. 20, 2020

Joy's Owner

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Darlene Stott - Dog Trainer and Groomer

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104 Dog owners recommended

Joy is pretty adorable! Thanks for the question. No doubt you will soon be starting Joy in her obedience training; attending classes may help to curb the barking. She will get used to being out in an exciting environment where structure is in place and barking is allowed during playtime, not when working and learning. I think that having a focus will help; have a small toy on hand when you are out and divert Joy from the barking through distraction. You are doing the right thing at home and there are other methods here that may transition to outings: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. In particular, once a dog learns the quiet command, they obey. This will go hand in hand with the positive reinforcement obedience training. Once Joy knows sit, down, heel, etc you can give her another focus to work on when the barking starts. Small dogs, in general, do like to bark - it's just an innate trait - so I wouldn't expect silence all of the time. Good luck and enjoy your puppy!

Feb. 21, 2020


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