How to Train a Husky to Not Run Away

Medium
1-8 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Your Husky is an important member of the family who brings you all together. They get you all giggling as they make their way around the dinner table begging for food. They bring a smile to your face when you walk through the door and they’re jumping up, eager to cover you in slobber. That’s why it’s sad when your Husky tries to run away. For the most part, you don’t understand it. You give them food, water, a comfy bed and plenty of love and affection.

Training your Husky not to run away is important for both you and them. If your dog escapes onto roads they could end up in a serious traffic collision, which could result in hefty vet bills or worse. This type of training will also instill discipline that you can use to phase out other bad habits too.

Defining Tasks

Training your Husky not to run away isn’t always straightforward. First, you will need to identify the underlying cause of their running away. Once you know that, you can then start tackling the problem. While you are doing that though, you can introduce a number of preventative measures. Obedience training will also be involved so you develop a need within yourHusky to always stay close by.

If your Husky is a puppy then they should be at their most receptive and you could see results in just a couple of weeks. But if your dog is older, stubborn and got a real taste for running away, then you may need a couple of months. If you get training right you’ll never have to worry when you lose sight of your Husky again. It also means you’ll be able to let them off the leash safely, which will give them more exercise and freedom to explore.

Getting Started

Before you start training, you will need to collect a few items. You will need a long leash. You will also need secure fencing and baby gates for one of the methods. A generous supply of treats or small pieces of your dog's favorite food will also be required. 

Set aside just a few minutes each day for training. You can practice in a yard, in the house or in nearby fields.

Once you have all that, just bring patience and a can-do attitude, then work can begin!

The Come Method

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Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Call their name
When you’re at home, make sure you have a few treats tucked away in your pocket. Then every now and then call your Husky’s name. You can also hold out a treat to tempt them over.
Step
2
Reward
As soon as they get to your feet, shower them in verbal praise and hand over a tasty reward. You want them to associate coming to you with positive consequences. Call your pooch to you several times through out the day.
Step
3
Continue outside
Start with your dog on a long leash when you go out for walks. Then periodically call them over like you have been doing inside and then hand over a treat. Do this regularly throughout the walk.
Step
4
Lose the leash
Once you have done this for several walks, you can then try letting them off the leash and continuing to call them over regularly. Before you know it, your Husky will be in a habit of always staying close to your side and running away won’t cross their mind.
Step
5
Be consistent
You can also have other members of the household call them over and give them rewards. The aim is to build up a dependence in your Husky to be near your family. It may take a while, so you will need to be patient.
Recommend training method?

The Meeting Needs Method

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Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Toilet time
Your Husky may be running away for any number of reasons. One of those may be that they are not regularly taken to the toilet and therefore have accidents and are trying to escape punishment. So, make sure you take your dog out regularly to avoid accidents and the drama that follows.
Step
2
Consistent food routine
Your dog may also be running away because they are hungry. So make sure you feed them meals at the same time each day. You need them to know they can expect food and don’t need to look elsewhere for it.
Step
3
Give attention
Their running away may also be attention seeking behavior. Just like humans, Huskies can be needy too. So spend a few minutes each day playing around, stroking them and making them feel loved.
Step
4
Toys
Alternatively, your dog may be running away out of boredom. So make sure they have plenty to do when you are not around. Toys and food puzzles will keep them occupied for hours on end. This can be particularly effective if you leave them in the house all day while you are at work.
Step
5
Boundaries
Secure your Husky to a leash and walk them around the perimeter of the house, once in the morning and once at night. This will drill into them where their territory begins and ends. They will then naturally want to stay within their territory to defend it.
Recommend training method?

The Prevention Method

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Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Obscure their view
Your Husky may be determined to escape because they can see a world of interesting things out there. So sometimes simply drawing curtains or putting up bushes to limit their view can remove the temptation.
Step
2
Baby gates
If your Husky is easily escaping and running away through certain doors then you may want to consider fitting baby gates. They are quick and easy to install and may prevent him running away entirely.
Step
3
Fencing
If they are escaping from your yard, then think about putting up some fencing. Make sure it is built deep into the ground as despite their size, Huskies can squeeze through remarkably small gaps. If they can’t escape, you will find your dog quickly gives up trying.
Step
4
Tether them
Try tethering your Husky to a long leash. Give them enough freedom to roam around, but make sure they can’t jump over any fences or escape. Again once they realize they can’t escape, they will swiftly give up.
Step
5
Don’t use punishment
If you punish your Husky when they run away, you may only frighten them and make them more determined to escape again. Instead, use positive reinforcement to make home the place where they want to be. This is the most effective way to train a Husky.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Balto
Siberian Husky
2 Years
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Question
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Balto
Siberian Husky
2 Years

So he’s kind of new to us. He is fixed. We have 6 acres. 1 acre with a 6’ fence. We walk him almost twice a day. He doesn’t want to play w toys he’s been taught obedience but want to get out and run but not in the fence. Wants to rough house but we previously have 3 older smallish girls dogs. 1 Chihuahua age 6/ terrier age 9 and a black/tan coon dog age 7. He just seems alway bored yet very hyper. I used to own a husky hybrid and a husky when I was younger and never this energetic lol. He is a very picky eater. What are some treat would you suggest to train him with? Amd toys he would like?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
946 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vicki, Each dog is a bit different as far as toy and treat preferences. Almost all of my clients like freeze dried liver as a treat, plus its healthier and gentle on most stomachs, so I like that. Real plain boiled chicken is another favorite of many. Even though your yard is very large, often dogs need engagement in order to entertain themselves and not feel bored. I would try things like hiking and walking with pup with pup wearing a pack to wear him out (start with the pack empty and slowly add weight as pup gains muscle and endurance). Teaching pup to pull something, and enjoying pup pulling you around. Again start with less weight and work up to more. Games that encourage pup's prey drive, like a flirt pole, scenting games, or things involving movement - you will have to experiment with what excites pup for this). Easy puzzle toys and things like kong wobbles might also get pup more interested in his dinner kibble. It seems counter-intuitive but some dogs are actually more interested in food when they have to work for it, as long as you don't make it too hard. Training practice in general, where pup is learning something new or increasing skill with current commands also tends to wear a lot of dogs out too. If you can combine physical and mental exercise together, something like training during a hike, this tends to wear most dogs out. Sometimes when you only provide physical exercise, more excitable dogs will gear up during the highly exciting exercise, without the focusing aspect of training to make them have to concentrate, and they will seem more excited instead of less after something like a run! Getting a dog thinking during work tends to lead to a calm dog after instead. Think about Husky's running, pulling a sled, but having to coordinate with each other, take directions from the sled driver, pull something behind them, and adjust to obstacles on the trail continuously - that's a lot of physical, mental, and social work! It's more than just running free. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Teddy Bear
Siberian Husky
3 Years
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Question
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Teddy Bear
Siberian Husky
3 Years

We have a husky and any chance he gets he will run off around the neighborhood so we have to keep him on a leash at all times when he is outside. Even though we have him on the leash he still has found way to run off on occasion. We have tried everything to keep him in the yard. Is there way to train him not to run away?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
946 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, First, is he neutered? If not, and if you don't plan to breed, I recommend getting him neutered. The desire to roam is very strong in a unneutered male and will make keeping pup close to home much harder without him neutered. Is pup escaping out of a fenced yard primarily? If so, you can bury an invisible/underground/electric fence two feet inside your fence perimeter and have pup wear the corresponding collar. The invisible fence should help deter pup from even approaching gates and the fence line to attempt a dig, climb or squeeze through for when you are not there. For times when you are there, you can work pup up to off-leash obedience. First, start working on a reliable Come. Check out the Reel In method from the article linked below. Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More Come - pay attention to the PreMack Principle and long leash training sections especially once pup has learned what Come initially means. These need to be practiced around all types of distractions like dogs and kids at the park to ensure pup is reliable before attempting true off leash. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Another activity you can practice is walking around places like your yard or a field with pup on the long training leash and changing directions frequently without saying anything. Whenever he takes notice (at first because the leash finally tugs, but later just because you moved), then toss a treat at him for looking your way or coming over to you - without calling him; this encourages him to choose to pay attention to where you are and associate your presence with good things on his own, so he will want to be with you. If you want to go further with the training, check out James Penrith from taketheleaddogtraining on youtube. He works a lot with off-leash training and problem behaviors like chasing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Abby
Siberian Husky
9 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Abby
Siberian Husky
9 Years

My dog just recently started busting through the fence to get out of the yard. We take her for 30 minute walks daily and she has access to go outside to our fenced in yard whenever she wants. She tends to escape within an hour of us leaving the house. She’s very calm when we are home and we’ve tried giving her bones before we leave to keep her busy but she’s still escaping. We lined the fence inside and out with large cobblestones but she digs at them then pushes them out of the way.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
946 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kristen, Since this behavior is only happening when you are not watching pup, you will want a solution that doesn't require you to be there for it to be enforced. If pup is digging out but not climbing the fence, you can bury chicken wire deep enough pup can't dig out, all around the perimeter of your fence, then fill the dirt back in over it. You can also install an electric fence (like the invisible fence kind that you bury underground) 2 feet inside the perimeter of your physical fence and have pup wear the corresponding collar, so pup is corrected every time they approach your fence perimeter. If pup is also climbing or escaping in ways other than digging at times, I recommend this route instead. I would teach pup the Out command and practice rewarding pup for staying away from the fence while they wear the electric fence collar for a few days, so pup understands that approaching the fence gets a correction, and not approaching gets pup a reward so the training is more clear and fair to pup then just learning through occasional corrections due to the fence. The invisible fence should only be used in combination with the current fence you have though, not in place of. An invisible fence by itself is not a good option for dogs who tend to wander, but used in combination with a physical fence it can help deter dogs from approaching the physical boundary in the first place to attempt an escape. If pup spayed? Are they in heat? If pup is not spayed and may be in heat now or soon, I would crate pup inside until after their heat cycle is over. There can be a strong urge to wander while in heat, and your fence will probably not keep male dogs from finding a way in from the outside if she is left in the fence. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Snowy
Husky
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Snowy
Husky
2 Years

She was digging at the fence line an escaped and ran around the neighborhood 6 times now . So every time I let her out side , she is pacing the fence line waiting for me to not be paying attention for a few moments so she can escape again . I know the problem that she can see through the fence and she wants to run free

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
946 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, Since this behavior is only happening when you are not watching pup, you will want a solution that doesn't require you to be there for it to be enforced. You can bury chicken wire deep enough pup can't dig out, all around the perimeter of your fence, then fill the dirt back in over it. You can also install an electric fence (line the invisible fence kind that you bury underground) 2 feet inside the perimeter of your chain link fence and have pup wear the corresponding collar, so pup is corrected every time they approach your fence. I would teach pup the Out command and practice rewarding pup for staying away from the fence while they wear the electric fence collar for a few days, so pup understands that approaching the fence gets a correction, and not approaching gets pup a reward so the training is more clear and fair to pup then just learning through occasional corrections due to the fence. The invisible fence should only be used in combination with the current fence you have though, not in place of. An invisible fence by itself is not a good option for dogs who tend to wander, but used in combination with a physical fence it can help deter dogs from approaching the physical boundary in the first place to attempt an escape. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Floki
Siberian Husky
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Floki
Siberian Husky
6 Months

My dog have a plenty space to play with lots of toys and also company (another 3 months husky-his brother)..his outside in the yard all the day except at night he sleeps in my room..
He always comes when I call his name but when he see another dogs or cats he just becomig deaf and running away

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
946 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maha, Check out the articles linked below for teaching come. At this age it's normal for puppies to run away to greet others due to the excitement of the outside world. Puppies have to learn through a lot of practice to come and stay when called. That practice has to happen on a long leash, so you can enforce pup calmly having to come even when they are distracted, and practice a lot around various types of distractions until pup can consistently come. Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More Come: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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