How to Train a Husky to Poop Outside

Medium
3-6 Months
General

Introduction

While Husky pups can be stubborn and do not typically respond well to being yelled at, they are relatively easy to potty train using the same basic methods you would use to train most other breeds. Keep in mind that whether you are teaching your pup to poop outside or anything else, he will respond to positive reinforcement far better as long as you provide clear and concise training instructions for him to follow.

One of the most important things you can do when trying to train your Husky to poop outside is that once you choose a training method, you need to stick to it, no matter how long it takes. Trying to switch training methods will only confuse your fuzzball and make it even harder for him to figure out exactly what it is you want of him.

Defining Tasks

The task at hand it to teach your dog that it is in no way acceptable for him to poop in the house. At the same time, he must learn that it is okay for him to poop in a particular area of your yard. Keep in mind, going potty in the house would be something akin to doing the same thing in his den in the wild. This is something his mother would have taught him not to do because no dog likes a dirty den.

The training process is really not that difficult, it is mostly about spending the time working with your pooch until he finally understands what you want of him.

Getting Started

What many people do not realize is that you can start training your Husky to poop outside from the minute you pull up in the driveway with him for the first time. At this point, you should put him on a leash and take him over to the spot in the yard that will become his potty. Let him wander around and get used to the area. When he goes potty, be sure to make a fuss over him and give him a nice little soft puppy treat.

Your poop training supply list:

  • A puppy sized crate – For training and when you can't be watching your pup
  • A leash – To take him out in the yard on
  • Soft treats – Soft chewy puppy treats will come in handy as rewards, be sure to use them generously

The last two things on your supply list are time and patience--you will need plenty of both in order for your training to succeed. Also, you need some form of enzymatic cleaner to completely eliminate any odors from areas where your pup has accidents. 

The I'm Watching You Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Stock up on treats
Keep a nice supply of your pup's favorite treats in your pocket or a bowl by the door where you can grab a few on the way out.
Step
2
Never a second alone
With your pup in the same room with you at all times, keep a very close eye on him every minute. If he shows any signs that he is thinking about pooping or peeing (squatting, circling, sniffing, scratching, going to the door) say "NO!" in a firm voice. You need to be loud enough to startle your pup, but do not make your voice sound like you are angry, this will just make things harder.
Step
3
We're off to see the…
Grab the leash, hook up your pooch, and take him outside using a verbal cue ("Let's go outside" or "Let's go potty"). When he goes, be sure to praise him and give him a tasty treat.
Step
4
Give him a little extra time
Having startled your pooch, it might take him a few extra minutes to refocus on what he was doing. So, make sure you give him a little extra time before you take him back in the house.
Step
5
The road goes ever on
From here there is nothing to do but keep practicing and working with your pup until he learns to hold himself and no longer leaves you surprises in the oddest places in your home.
Recommend training method?

The Using His Crate Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Create the perfect blend
Set your pup's crate up where you can keep an eye on it. Add a water bowl, a few toys, and a bed for him to lie down on. Then place your pup inside and close the door.
Step
2
Out on cue
Set a timer for 30 minutes. When it goes off, open the door, put your pup on the leash, and say, "Let's go outside" or "let's go potty" and take him straight out to the area where he can go poop.
Step
3
Will he, won't he?
You won't know until you give him some time. Give him a good 15 minutes to try, let him walk around. The more he walks around, the more likely he will poop. If he goes, give him lots of praise and a treat. If not that’s okay too, just take him back inside and put him back in his crate.
Step
4
Reset
Reset the timer for another 30 minutes. Keep a close eye on your pup. If he starts to whine and fuss, take him straight out regardless of what the clock has to say. When he poops, be sure to make a fuss over him and give him a treat.
Step
5
Build endurance
Slowly, in five or ten-minute increments, start increasing the time between poop breaks. This will help your pup develop his endurance. Remember to use your cue, "Let's go outside" or "Let's go potty". Choose one and stick to it so he doesn't get confused.
Step
6
Free at last
By now you should be able to start leaving the crate door open and letting your pup wander around in the same room with you. Keep a close eye on him and at the first sign he might be thinking about going potty, use your cue and take him out. When he goes, be sure to praise him and give him a nice treat. Stick to your timer schedule and in time he will learn not to go in the house.
Recommend training method?

The Mark Your Territory Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Stop by your favorite pet supply store
Stop by your favorite pet supply store and pick up a bottle of puppy potty training spray. These sprays contain pheromones designed to mark your grass with a scent that your pup will see as another dog. They then encourage him to mark the area as his by peeing and pooping in it.
Step
2
Every 30
Set a timer for 30 minutes and when it goes off, put your pup on his leash and take him out to the spot you marked previously.
Step
3
Let him wander
Let your pup wander around the marked area and give him time to go potty. When he does, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
I don't need to go right now
If after 15 minutes your pup has not found the need to go, that's okay, just take him back inside. Reset the timer and keep a close eye on him. While the timer is ticking away, if he shows any signs he need to go potty, take him straight out to the marked area. When he goes, be sure to praise him and give him treats.
Step
5
Keep on keepin' on
The rest is all on you. You need to keep practicing with your pup slowly adding more time as you go until your pup starts letting you know when he needs to go. Mission accomplished!
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Remi
Husky/ Malamute
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Remi
Husky/ Malamute
6 Months

My dog will not poop outside anymore, she pees outside and is rewarded a treat afterwards. Remi will only poop when her humans are sleeping or at work

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karissa, What has changed recently since she stopped pooping outside? Generally if a dog used to poop outside and no longer will, there is a reason. Any of the following might be going on, preventing her from pooping outside: 1. She is not being given enough time to poop while outside after she pees (dogs tend to take longer to poop and need to be reminded to go again after peeing). 2. She is not being moved around enough to get things moving along. Walking stimulates a dog to poop. When you take her outside on the leash, slowly walk her around your yard, tell her to "Go Potty" and encourage her to sniff the ground. If she starts pulling toward a spot, sniffing a lot, or circling, that is a sign that she is about to go, give her slack in the leash to let her find a spot. 3. She is being free-fed, rather than fed at set times, and her pooping is no longer on a schedule (Most puppies will need to poop around thirty-minutes after eating, and will go potty if you give them enough time, remind them to go potty again after peeing, and walk them around to get things going. 4. She is being given too much freedom in the home. If this is the case, then I suggest crate training and following the "Crate Training" method found in this article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside 5. She is dehydrated or constipated and pooping is unpleasant for her...In which case she should see the vet and a gradual change in food and offering more water needs to happen. 6. She has been yelled at or harshly punished for pooping or peeing in front of you inside and now refuses to go potty in front of you and ends up holding it all day until you are not around...If this is the case, then no more yelling or harsh punishments for accidents, praise and reward a ton whenever she goes potty outside - including peeing, and when you take her outside, take her on a twenty- or thirty-foot leash and act like you are not looking when she goes potty. After she goes while on the long leash, toss lots of treats over to her. When she gets comfortable going in your presence again, then you can gradually shorten the leash until she will go on a normal six-foot leash for you again. 7. Something scared her while she was outside and she is now afraid of being in your yard. If this is the case, then you will need to spend a lot of time in the yard with her just hanging out, playing games, practicing training, giving her food-stuffed toys to chew on, and generally making the yard relaxing and pleasant for her again to help her get over her fear of being out there...Pooping puts a dog in a vulnerable position so dogs do not like to poop if they don't feel safe. Addressing the underlying cause and following the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked above should help. If you don't see any improvement, then look for additional clues for what has changed since she stopped pooping. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Zoro
Siberian Husky
1 Year
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Question
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Zoro
Siberian Husky
1 Year

Hello. So my family just got a 3rd dog. Zoro, a husky puppy. Unfortunately, Zoro has had a rough past year and no one who has had him has really had time to train him. My main question for training Zoro is how can I get him to go to the bathroom outside in a specific area? He will only poop right next to the front door and has been peeing there too. Even when we take him outside to the area he is supposed to use the bathroom in he just stands there until we go inside and then pees and poops next to the front door. Please give me a few ideas on how to train him to go to the bathroom outside.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erin, It sounds like Zoro would benefit from crate training. Crate Training would help him hold his bladder while inside so that the only opportunity to use the bathroom is outside where you take him. Also, purchase a potty encouraging spray like "Go Here", "Potty Training Sprah", or "Hurry Up!" and spray that on the area that you want him to pee or poop on. The smell will help him go there. Also, when you take him potty tell him to "Go Potty" and give him five treats (or pieces of his own food), one piece at a time. This will help him go potty faster in the future. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method. Since he is older than a puppy, you can take him potty every three to four hours when you are home, and take him back outside every hour after the first three hours if he doesn't go then (he should be taken back inside if he doesn't go potty and put in the crate so he won't have an accident). After he goes potty outside, he can be out of the crate for two hours. After the two hours are up, put him back into the crate until time for his next potty trip.This schedule prevents him from being free when his bladder is full to reduce accidents and help him go potty outside instead. When you aren't home, he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for six hours. Once he is potty trained and used to holding his bladder he can hold it for eight when absolutely necessary. More frequent potty trips when you are home will help him learn faster though. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Lady
Siberian Husky
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lady
Siberian Husky
4 Months

She will let me know when she has to go out to pee or just wants to go outside but will still poop in the house so what do I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joshua, It's great that she will let you know when she needs to pee but she essentially needs to be treated like she still isn't potty trained yet (because she isn't fully with poop). Follow the crate training method from the article linked below, or the Tethering method when you are home. When you have to leave the house, at her age she should be able to hold it 4-5 hours in the crate, but no longer during the day. Potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you take her potty, take her on a leash still to keep her focused. Tell her to Go Potty and give one treat for peeing. After she pees always walk her around for several more minutes and tell her to "Go Potty" again. Give five treats, one at a time, if she poops. If she doesn't poop and hasn't gone yet during that part of the day, then put her back into the crate when you come inside or tether her to yourself with the leash - no freedom until she poops. Repeat this when it has been a few hours and she may need to poop again (most puppies poop 2-3 times a day). Most puppies also have to poop within 15-30 minutes of eating, so take her back outside after eating even if she just peed outside. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Junior
Siberan husky
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Junior
Siberan husky
4 Months

He does not want to poop or pee outside we have he hydrated and with food he has a little ranch to run around we got him 4 days ago.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mayela, Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below and follow that method carefully. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside The Crate Training - to limit freedom inside to when their bladder is empty, teaching the Go Potty command, rewarding for pottying outside, and the instructions to walk pup around slowly on a leash can all help a puppy learn to go potty while outside. Many puppies get distracted outside so won't go. The above things from the article I have linked can help. If pup seems nervous while outside, I also suggest spending more time with pup outside on a long (non-retractable) training leash. Do fun and relaxing things with pup while out there to help them get over their fear - such as playing Tug of War, Fetch, hiding large treats in the grass, teaching commands or fun tricks using positive reinforcement and lure reward training, and simply hanging out outside for long periods of time by doing things like sitting in the grass and reading a book for an hour while pup chews on a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy -like a kong. Most dogs don't want to go potty if they feel unsafe, so if pup feels nervous, spending time outside to help desensitize him to it can help that aspect in combination with the article I have linked. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Koba
Siberian Husky
4 Months
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Question
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Koba
Siberian Husky
4 Months

My Husky Koba right now I believe he’s doing it on purpose I have no idea. But he will not go potty outside he was doing it but now he just wants to run back inside right when we just got outside and we will be out there for at least 20min and he still wants to go back inside. I tried crate training him but either he pees all over in his cage, breaks out because he does know how to open it. I really have no idea what to do and it’s stressing me out I have a 4 year old pit bull and I thought it would be easier because thinking that a puppy will follow the older dog in the house but he doesn’t do that either.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Terry, First, make sure that the crate is only big enough for pup to stand up, turn around, and lie down, and not so big pup can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big and it won't encourage pup to hold it. Also make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate, including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent option. Know that a pup can generally hold their bladder maximum during the day for the number of months they are in age plus one - meaning no longer than 4-5 hours during the day. Ideally pup should be taken out every 1.5-2 though. If any of those things aren't being done already, do that first, before giving up on the crate. Spy on pup with a camera, such as smart phones or tablets with skype on mute, and see how pup is escaping. Often using carabiners at the corners and door or crate will stop escaping. Second, if using the crate is still an option potty wise, but pup can still escape with the carabiner solution, I suggest switching to a more durable crate pup can't escape from. Check out the article linked below for solutions to crate escapes and more durable options. https://www.k9ofmine.com/heavy-duty-dog-crates/ Third, if he is not already used to a crate expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If he continues protesting for long periods of time past five days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" by using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward him quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Fourth, if pup can be crate trained, then follow the Crate Training method from the article linked below for the potty training aspect - to teach pup to go while outside. Since pup is a little older, you can add 30 minutes to all of the times suggested for potty breaks, freedom between potty trips, and take pup potty every hour if pup doesn't go when you first take them, until they finally go. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Fifth, if you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost his desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare puppies who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup his meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until he is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold his bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so he won't go into there looking to pee, and take him potty outside only. Since he may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave him alone, be sure to leave him in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until he is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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