How to Train a Labrador Puppy to Bark at Strangers

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Your Lab puppy's barks might not bother you now, but wait until he is full-grown, and they are loud enough to annoy the neighbors several houses away. Rather than having to deal with angry neighbors, you need to take the time to train your pup when it's okay to bark and in doing so teach him that these are the only times he is allowed to bark. Keep in mind that most dogs do not bark just to hear themselves make noise, they bark to communicate, just like we talk. The trick is to make sure your pup understands when it is okay for him to bark and when it is not. In particular, you want him to bark when there are strangers about. 

Defining Tasks

The basic idea here is to teach your pup that one of the only time it is okay for him to bark is when there is a stranger at your door or outside of your house. There may be other times when you want him to bark on command. This is a very important lesson for your pup to learn as it could save your home from being robbed or someone in your family being injured. The reality is that once you teach your pup to bark on command, he will be able to easily transfer this to barking when there is a stranger about.

Getting Started

For this, your pup should already have mastered the basic commands of 'sit', 'stay', 'come', and 'down'. This way he already understands that he needs to follow the commands you give him and the training he is undergoing. By training the basics first, your pup will know who is in the Alpha position and will be more likely to follow the rest of your training without a problem.

  • Leash
  • Treats
  • Broomstick
  • A favorite toy
  • A helper

You will also need plenty of time and patience to work with your puppy as he learns what you expect of him and does his best to comply. 

The You've Got a Friend Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
To the room with you
Start by taking your pup in the area of your home where your front door and doorbell button are located.
Step
2
Add one friend
You need the help of at least one willing volunteer. It can be someone your pup knows or not since they are going to be on the outside anyway.
Step
3
Ring the bell
Start by having your friend come up to the front door and ring the bell. If your pup barks, be sure to praise him and give him a treat. Repeat this several times until your pup will bark every time the doorbell rings.
Step
4
The windows
Next have your friend walk up to one of the windows and start tapping on it. When your pup barks at the noise, give him a treat and praise him.
Step
5
The final plan
The rest is all about having different people follow this pattern over the course of several weeks until your pup will bark any time a stranger comes up to the house as his way of alerting you to their presence.
Recommend training method?

The Choose the Word Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Choose your word
Start by choosing your cue or command word. The most commonly used one is simply "speak" as it is easy for both you and your pup to remember.
Step
2
Let frustration set in
Try tying your pup to a table leg using his leash and leave the room, going just around the corner where he can't see you. Call him, chances are that when he realizes he can't get to you, he is going to bark. When he does, hurry back into the room, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
3
Repeat in short bursts
Keep repeating the training in short bursts until your pup barks each time.
Step
4
Introduce the command
Introduce your pup to the 'speak' command and each time he barks in response, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
Bring in the stranger
Arrange to have one of your friends that your pup doesn’t know meet you when you are out for a walk. Give your pup the 'speak' command and when he barks at the "stranger", praise him and give him a treat.
Step
6
At the door
Time to work with your pup and strangers knocking on the door or ringing the bell. When the bell is rung, tell your pup to "speak" and reward him when he does. With a little practice, your pup will learn to bark anytime a stranger comes to your door or approaches you during your walks.
Recommend training method?

The Unexpected Noises Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Praise the unexpected
Each time your pup barks at an unexpected noise such as the doorbell, a knock on the door, someone pulling into the driveway, be sure to praise him and give him one of his favorite treats.
Step
2
A big deal
Be sure you make a big deal about finding out what your pup is barking at. Use phrases like "What is it?" or "What do you hear?" while encouraging him to come to the door and see who is there. Keep praising him and letting him know he is doing a good job.
Step
3
Bark when I tell you
If for some reason your pup doesn’t seem to want to bark when someone comes to the door, try using a cue word like "Speak" or "What is it?" The moment he makes the slightest sound, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
Be quiet
Be sure to use the 'quiet' command to get him to stop barking. Again, praise him when he complies.
Step
5
Practice makes perfect
Keep practicing with your pup every chance you get. Encourage him to bark when someone comes to the door and then to stop upon command. Remember consistency builds success, so be patient, be consistent and be successful.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Max
Labrador Retriever
4 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Max
Labrador Retriever
4 Months

Max's age is 4 months,but he doesn't seem to bark at strangers.He wags his tail at them.What's the age for labs to bark?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
53 Dog owners recommended

Hello Reshma, The age various between individual dogs. Some puppies begin barking at strangers as early as twelve weeks, but between one and two years of age is when certain natural defense drives, protective instincts, and territorial instincts show up the most. Those types of instincts often lead to more barking. At six months of age you will likely see some increase, but you can train him to bark at strangers as a simple cue and not just because he feels suspicious of them. Training him to speak on cue is actually preferable in a lot of cases because it leads to less liability of an inappropriate bite happening due to fearfulness or aggression being encouraged. To teach him to "Speak" on cue follow one of the methods from the article that I have linked bellow. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-speak Once he knows the speak command, then whenever you see a stranger, command him to "Speak" and reward him when he barks. Repeat this until he will bark automatically when he sees a stranger, in anticipation of you telling him to "Speak". Reward him when he does this. While you are training him to bark on cue you can also substitute the "Speak" command for something more subtle if you prefer, such as "Whose that?" or "Look". Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Thanks for your suggestions

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