How to Train a Miniature Schnauzer to Not Bite

Easy
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Do you have a Miniature Schnauzer who seems to love biting? While you might think this is somewhat normal behavior, there are no breeds of dog for whom this type of behavior in an adult dog is natural or acceptable. Remember, what might seem like playful biting at first can easily turn into serious attempts to bite that can and often do result in injuries. No matter what you might think, there is no point at which your pooch's biting should be tolerated. 

Defining Tasks

In nature, your pup would engage with his litter brothers and sisters in play that often involves in biting, chewing, tussling, wrestling, and many other forms of contact play. It is how they learn about their environment and their place in the family. As they mature, it may become the way they take their place in the pack. At home though, this type of behavior is not needed nor necessary. But, unless you teach your dog to stop biting, he may never outgrow the habit. 

Getting Started

Unlike many other forms of training, teaching your dog not to bite doesn't take much in the way of supplies. Of all the things you might need, patience and plenty of time for training are the most important. Of course, you may also need a few chew toys, some treats, and a nice quiet place to work with him in. 

The Redirect Method

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Step
1
We shall come a-gathering
Gather up a few chew toys to use in redirecting your pup's need to chew.
Step
2
When he bites
When your pup starts to bite you, move your hand slowly away while saying "No Bite!"
Step
3
Replacement therapy
Then give him a chew toy to play with. When Spike takes it from you and starts to chew on it, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
No rough play
If rough play tends to put Spike in the mood to bite, the obvious answer is to cut back on the level of play and use a chew toy instead of your hands to play with him.
Step
5
Keep working it
The secret is to keep working with Spike, consistently redirecting his desire to bite to the toy. In time, he will simply kick back and chew rather than bite.
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The No Bite Method

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Step
1
A time to bite
When Spike decides he needs to bite you, let him know he shouldn’t be by saying "No bite" or better yet, yelping like one of his litter mates would if he were biting them.
Step
2
Walk on by
At this point, turn your back to Spike and walk away. Do not say anything, do not get mad at him, do not pet him, just walk on by.
Step
3
If he doesn't stop
If he still keeps trying to bite you, take a tin can full of pennies and make a loud rattling noise with it. This should startle him and put an immediate end to his biting. While you are rattling the can, be sure to give Spike the "No Bite!" command.
Step
4
During game play
If the biting occurred during gameplay, either of these methods will put an immediate end to the game. You should give Spike time to calm down.
Step
5
Try, try again
Once Spike has managed to calm down, you can resume play and try again. Continue repeating the training until he finally gets the idea that biting is never going to be his best plan of action.
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The Reach Out and Touch Method

Effective
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Step
1
A quiet room
Find a nice quiet room in your home to work on training Spike not to touch. Bring Spike into the room and put him on the floor or if he has already mastered the 'sit/stay' commands, have him sit.
Step
2
At his level
This training works better when you are on your knees close to his level. Once you are on the floor, slowly move your hand towards Spike, but only go a couple of inches at first.
Step
3
If he stays put
If Spike stays put, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
If he moves
If Spike moves, put him back in place and try again.
Step
5
The real test
Place a treat on the floor between you and then move your hand close to it. If Spike stays put, let him have the treat. Keep working on this, getting a little closer to him and the treat each time. With plenty of practice, you should soon be able to lay the treat on the floor, reach out and touch your pup, all without the fear of being bitten anymore.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

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