How to Train a Miniature Schnauzer to Not Bite

Easy
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Do you have a Miniature Schnauzer who seems to love biting? While you might think this is somewhat normal behavior, there are no breeds of dog for whom this type of behavior in an adult dog is natural or acceptable. Remember, what might seem like playful biting at first can easily turn into serious attempts to bite that can and often do result in injuries. No matter what you might think, there is no point at which your pooch's biting should be tolerated. 

Defining Tasks

In nature, your pup would engage with his litter brothers and sisters in play that often involves in biting, chewing, tussling, wrestling, and many other forms of contact play. It is how they learn about their environment and their place in the family. As they mature, it may become the way they take their place in the pack. At home though, this type of behavior is not needed nor necessary. But, unless you teach your dog to stop biting, he may never outgrow the habit. 

Getting Started

Unlike many other forms of training, teaching your dog not to bite doesn't take much in the way of supplies. Of all the things you might need, patience and plenty of time for training are the most important. Of course, you may also need a few chew toys, some treats, and a nice quiet place to work with him in. 

The Reach Out and Touch Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
A quiet room
Find a nice quiet room in your home to work on training Spike not to touch. Bring Spike into the room and put him on the floor or if he has already mastered the 'sit/stay' commands, have him sit.
Step
2
At his level
This training works better when you are on your knees close to his level. Once you are on the floor, slowly move your hand towards Spike, but only go a couple of inches at first.
Step
3
If he stays put
If Spike stays put, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
If he moves
If Spike moves, put him back in place and try again.
Step
5
The real test
Place a treat on the floor between you and then move your hand close to it. If Spike stays put, let him have the treat. Keep working on this, getting a little closer to him and the treat each time. With plenty of practice, you should soon be able to lay the treat on the floor, reach out and touch your pup, all without the fear of being bitten anymore.
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The Redirect Method

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Step
1
We shall come a-gathering
Gather up a few chew toys to use in redirecting your pup's need to chew.
Step
2
When he bites
When your pup starts to bite you, move your hand slowly away while saying "No Bite!"
Step
3
Replacement therapy
Then give him a chew toy to play with. When Spike takes it from you and starts to chew on it, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
No rough play
If rough play tends to put Spike in the mood to bite, the obvious answer is to cut back on the level of play and use a chew toy instead of your hands to play with him.
Step
5
Keep working it
The secret is to keep working with Spike, consistently redirecting his desire to bite to the toy. In time, he will simply kick back and chew rather than bite.
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The No Bite Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
A time to bite
When Spike decides he needs to bite you, let him know he shouldn’t be by saying "No bite" or better yet, yelping like one of his litter mates would if he were biting them.
Step
2
Walk on by
At this point, turn your back to Spike and walk away. Do not say anything, do not get mad at him, do not pet him, just walk on by.
Step
3
If he doesn't stop
If he still keeps trying to bite you, take a tin can full of pennies and make a loud rattling noise with it. This should startle him and put an immediate end to his biting. While you are rattling the can, be sure to give Spike the "No Bite!" command.
Step
4
During game play
If the biting occurred during gameplay, either of these methods will put an immediate end to the game. You should give Spike time to calm down.
Step
5
Try, try again
Once Spike has managed to calm down, you can resume play and try again. Continue repeating the training until he finally gets the idea that biting is never going to be his best plan of action.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Layla
mini schnauzer
10 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Layla
mini schnauzer
10 Weeks

New puppy , first dog for our family .. she is adorable and we all love her but she is a big time biter .. and it hurts . We also say “no bite “ and redirect to her toys .. we feel this will never stop

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
709 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexa, Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but they can also be a great way to create your own puppy class with pup. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Finally, check out the free PDF ebook AFTER You Get Your Puppy at the link below: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luca
schnauzer
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luca
schnauzer
5 Months

My dog bites a lot and it hards for me to calm him down when he's hyper and the bitting is getting serious because he sometimes hurts my mother.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
93 Dog owners recommended

Hello, at this age, it is no longer cute puppy biting, it may be bordering on aggression. Teach Luca the Leave It Method as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. This method is effective and also comes in handy with other instances such as getting Luca to drop something you don't want him to have etc. Luca is the ideal age for dog training classes. Taking him there will also help to calm him a bit as the training class is tiring for a dog (in a good way). The brain and the body are exercised - two important things when it comes to energetic puppies. Try to divert Luca's attention to something else when he bites and don't be afraid to tell him no with a firm voice. Don't use aggression, however, as it may set him off. Luca needs a lot of exercise, so make sure he is getting a couple of good walks a day. If the biting does not stop with your training, call in a trainer to come to the home. And don't forget, obedience classes are a must for a headstrong little Schnauzer. Good luck and happy training!

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Question
Gizmo
Shnauzer
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Gizmo
Shnauzer
9 Weeks

He keeps biting even when Im in bed calm.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
134 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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