How to Train a Pekingese to Stop Biting

Medium
3-9 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Incredible Pekingese pups were bred many years ago for royalty. If you have a Pekingese in your home, you know just how noble he is. He's courageous and even bold. He lets his demands be known and will sometimes even bite to ensure you are listening and paying attention.

If you feel your Pekingese is aggressive and acting out with poor choices by biting you, other people, or even other animals, he may be dealing with his own personal boundary issues. Families with children who also have a Pekingese in their home sometimes find battles between the dog and the child because the Pekingese breed is typically so strong-willed they believe they are in charge. When it comes to someone picking them up or crossing their boundaries, they are more likely to bite. Even if your Pekingese is a well-behaved pup you might find when he's uncomfortable and feels someone has encroached upon his space, he may react or overreact with a nip or bite.

Defining Tasks

If your Pekingese is a puppy and he is biting, you should know this is pretty normal puppy behavior. However, it's a habit that needs to be broken early so it doesn't become a behavior as he grows. If your Pekingese is an adult and he's biting, you will need to spend a bit more time reminding him how to behave and training him not to bite.

Training a Pekingese is not the easiest thing to do, but you can teach your little guy how to play with others, whether people or animals, in a nice and gentle fashion. Doing this kind of training will consist of setting the dog up to bite, correcting his behavior, and then rewarding him when he does not react as he has in the past.

Getting Started

If your Pekingese plays with toys, be sure to have some of his favorite toys on hand for your training sessions. This training will be positive reinforcement-based training so you will need to reward your little guy for his good choices. Schedule some short sessions to teach these reminders and a have few commands in mind to ask your Pekingese to be gentle and not bite. Your dog is more likely to learn in sessions that are short enough to hold his attention and that are free of distractions around him.

The Puppy Cry Method

Effective
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Step
1
During play
When your Pekingese bites you while you're playing together, give him a puppy yelp. He should be fairly used to the sound of his litter mates yelping when they are bitten. This is how puppies play, and it is completely normal. But you do need to begin to train him that it’s not appropriate.
Step
2
Stop playing
After making your puppy yelp sound, stop playing with your Pekingese. He needs to understand if he chooses to bite he's going to lose play time with you.
Step
3
Command
Teach a command such as 'be gentle' so he knows any time he's overplaying or being too rough to calm down and play in a more gentle fashion. To do this, say the command each time you are playing with your Pekingese and he bites.
Step
4
Challenge
Continue to challenge Fido by playing with him and enticing him to bite. When your little guy plays too rough or acts as if he's going to bite, use your 'gentle' command to remind him how to behave.
Step
5
Not biting
When your pup is playing on a consistent basis without biting, start rewarding for his good behaviors. Anytime he bites during playtime, stop playing and give him the ‘gentle’ command and no treat. When he's playing well and not biting, reward him with a treat.
Recommend training method?

The Engage and Distract Method

Effective
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Step
1
Engage with pup
Spend some time playing with your Pekingese getting him excited. If he decides to nip at you while you're playing, distract him with something else to chew on.
Step
2
Distract
Have toys on hand during your play time to offer your little guy instead of your fingers.
Step
3
In his mouth
Keep your pup's mouth distracted and entertained by placing a chew toy directly in his mouth anytime he decides to nip at you.
Step
4
Stop playing
If your dog will not behave and is choosing to bite you instead of playing with you, stop playing all together and walk away. This is a distraction that will cause him to pause.
Step
5
Get his attention
Engage your pup in a more positive way by getting his attention. Say his name and distract him with motion and play in another manner.
Step
6
Make noise
Distract your little guy by making some loud noises. You can shake a tin can full of coins or a musical egg to get his attention focused on something besides whatever he's biting.
Step
7
Play nice
Encourage your Pekingese to play nice by reminding him with a command each time he needs to be redirected from poor behaviors. When you catch your little guy playing nicely on his own reward him with a tasty treat.
Recommend training method?

The Obedience Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Set your role
Make your role as your dog's master well-known in his world. As the leader of your dog’s pack, he will likely listen to you more and obey your commands.
Step
2
Reinforcement
When your Pekingese behaves well and is obedient, reward him with positive reinforcement rewards. You will give him a treat every time he behaves well or follows a basic command. Any other time, plan to ignore poor behaviors or redirect by showing him positive behaviors.
Step
3
Train, train, train
If your Pekingese has a biting problem, be sure to train basic obedience commands. These very simple foundational commands will set you as the leader and your dog as your follower.
Step
4
Potty training
Be sure to housebreak your Pekingese as well as teach basic obedience commands. A housebroken dog is more likely to listen to his owner than one who is allowed to do whatever he wishes inside the house.
Step
5
Firm voice
When you need to redirect your puppy, use a firm voice. Avoid punishment or any physical hitting. You can simply use commands or tell your Pekingese to be gentle by using a firm voice.
Step
6
Positive engagement
Engage with your Pekingese in positive ways. Encourage playtime together and reward for good behaviors and obedience training as he learns.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Hercules
AnimalBreed object
4 Years
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Question
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Hercules
AnimalBreed object
4 Years

Hercules belonged to my husband before we got married and had a baby. He is a rescue, found hurt, abandoned and probably abused when he was around 1 y.o. He moved in with us when i was pregnant and has been with our baby since the day she was born. He had bitten me a couple of times for no obvious reason and growls at me when i am hugging my husband. He seems to be doing a lot better, after i started being a bit more dominant but also spent more time playing with him and caring for him, but he has bitten quite a lot of people until now, but never my husband. He seemed to be very tolerant of our 11 month baby, who crawls all over and sometimes pulls his tail or pats him on the head (things he wouldn't tolerate from an adult), until one day he attacked her and bit her forehead. It was not a very serious wound but it could be worse. It happened right in front of us, when we were in the kitchen, the dog was begging my husband for a treat off the table(i find this a very bad habit) and our baby crawled behind him, probably making him think that she wanted to get something too.
we had to go to the emergency room where the doctor told us that we should get rid of the dog because he will definitely do this again. We punished him by keeping him alone in the living room and shouted at him after he attacked. What can we do to avoid this from happening? They are always under supervision but this was just so fast and i don't think taking him to the pound is a solution..

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
673 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ioanna, I am so sorry this happened. You need to hire a professional who will use positive reinforcement and fair corrections and a lot of structure. Hercules needs the doggie equivalent of boot-camp. Starting today he needs to work for every single thing he gets in life. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow all of the methods, but focus the most on the "Consistency" method and the "Working" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Also, check out Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training. He has several YouTube videos talking about implementing structure, boundaries, and dealing with aggression. You can also book a phone or Skype consultation with him, but I recommend still hiring someone to work with you longer-term in your home, rather than doing just that. Finally, you need to desensitize Hercules to being touched and to having people approach him when there is food around . This is done carefully through a combination of positive reinforcement for tolerance and building trust by giving treats when you and your child gets close and he remains calm, and corrections while wearing gloves or him wearing a muzzle for protection when he does react poorly. The corrections have to be done in a certain way to interrupt the behavior and simply show him that you will follow through on what you tell him to do, and without correcting too harshly. Although it can be hard, your attitude while training should be calm, firm, and persistent, rather than angry or timid. A trainer can help build your confidence too by showing you how to train and structure life for Hercules. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
SUSHI
AnimalBreed object
8 Months
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Question
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SUSHI
AnimalBreed object
8 Months

She attacks all kinds of objects, especially table and chair legs when she has to eat. She runs away from her food to do this.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. It could be a few things. Sushi may be possessive of her food and this is her way of showing it, or it could be that she is excited and bites at things before eating due to the excitement. Has Sushi always displayed this behavior? Or is it something new? Has something changed in her environment? Lastly, does she seem healthy otherwise? I ask this because of she is having a reaction to her food that you cannot see, she may act out before eating it - she's hungry, so will eat but is not keen on the food. You can have a favorite toy handy that she can play with as the food is being put down, to distract her from biting the furniture. Also, take a look at her skin to make sure there is no dryness, redness, or irritation pointing to a reaction to the food. You can also take her to the vet for a checkup in case there is an issue with her teeth. Take a look at these articles that may help. https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-over-food https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-puppy-to-not-bite-over-food You could also train Sushi to wait for her food, sitting calmly as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/wait-for-food Good luck and have fun with Sushi!

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Question
Kai
AnimalBreed object
8 Years
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Question
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Kai
AnimalBreed object
8 Years

How do I get my dog to not snap or bite at guests when someone gets close or walks by him?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Is this a new behavior for Kai? I would take him to the vet to rule out a medical issue. Issues like dental problems or arthritis can cause a dog to lash out. So, that is the first step. As well, you can try the Desensitizing Method and the Establish Leadership Method : https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers. I would also brush up on Kai's obedience commands, and even consider taking him back to school. It's never too late - and taking him to classes will enable him to gain confidence (and respect) which will carry over to how he reacts around strangers. Good luck!

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Brownie
AnimalBreed object
11 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Brownie
AnimalBreed object
11 Years

we’ve had Brownie since he was a puppy and he’s lunged and nipped badly at our neighbor once and recently he has been nipping/biting more often for what seems like no reason. If he’s sitting with us and then we move or try to let him he’ll try biting and we don’t know why. how do we help this?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. Due to his age, and the circumstances around this, I would have him evaluated by a veterinarian. I like to disclose I am NOT medically trained, but with my experience, it sounds like he may have the beginning of a vision problem. It often goes un-noticed by us because their senses are so keen that they can usually over compensate for any loss of a sense. I would get a quick evaluation done by a vet and then go from there.

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Question
Milo
AnimalBreed object
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Milo
AnimalBreed object
4 Months

He's brand new to our house
Every time kids try to pet him he's very very aggressive and bites
Any suggestions?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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