How to Train a Pit Bull Puppy to Listen

Medium
6-12 Weeks
General

Introduction

If you have a Pit Bull puppy, you may be aware of a common misconception with the breed. Some Pit Bulls, like other breeds, have been trained to be fighters or otherwise mean dogs. But your Pit Bull is naturally a very loving and gentle dog. You can train him from an early age to listen to you and be a great friend and pet in your family. If you train your Pit Bull puppy now to listen to you, he will always look at you as the leader of his pack and therefore won't be the pup with the bad rap.

Imagine the joy of having such a wonderful dog in your family from a breed filled with misconceptions. You can show the world and your community he is a kind, loving pet with manners and strong obedience to you.

Defining Tasks

Training your Pit Bull to listen to you will start with teaching him basic obedience commands and manners. While your Pit Bull is still young, another thing you will need to do during your training sessions after he has gotten his initial vaccinations is to socialize him. Getting your Pit Bull puppy around other dogs is crucial to teaching him manners and conditioning him to understand what your expectations are when it comes to his behavior. During socialization and obedience training, you should be teaching him basic commands such as 'sit', 'down', 'come', 'stay', 'watch me', 'wait', and general manners while walking on a leash or expectations when he is out in public.

Starting small with a puppy works wonders in getting him to listen to you. Start by teaching him his name so he knows when you are talking to him. Other training like housebreaking will also leave you in command. 

Getting Started

Teaching your little Pit Bull to listen will be an ongoing process. You will want your little guy to be rewarded and learn through positive reinforcement. Avoid any training that requires you to punish your Pit Bull. He will respond more with positive reinforcement and rewards for good behavior and good choices than with punishments. Anytime you can, turn a moment into a learning opportunity and reward him for learning, do so. This will require always having tasty treats on hand.

The Your Pit’s Leader Method

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2 Votes
Step
1
Basic obedience
Train your Pit Bull basic obedience commands early on. Once he’s a part of your family, you can start with small training sessions. Start with 'sit' and move to 'down' before working on 'stay' and 'release'. These short training sessions will show him you are the leader and will tell him what to do, with high expectations. Plan to offer lots of rewards to earn his respect as well.
Step
2
Sit
Hold a treat high above your Pit’s head. When you have his attention, move it back towards the back of his head and wait patiently. As he follows the treat with his nose because he wants to earn it, he will likely sit down. When he sits say the command "sit" and give him the treat. Practice this for a few weeks before moving on to the next command.
Step
3
Down
Put your Pit Bull puppy in a 'sit' position because he is well rehearsed at this, and give him a treat for listening and obeying. Once he's in a sitting position, take a second treat and hold it to his nose, then bring it slowly down towards the floor. Once the treat is near the floor, pull it away from his body towards yours. This should lead him to stretch out and lie down on his tummy. When he's down, say the command "down" and give him the treat. Practice often.
Step
4
Stay
Your pup should be between 12 and 14 weeks old when you try to teach him the 'stay' command. He should understand 'sit' and 'down' and be doing those two commands easily. When he's in one of those positions use the command 'stay.' Take a step away from him holding your hand up palm facing towards your dog and wait a moment. Give him a treat if he stays put and practice by taking more steps away over several sessions.
Step
5
Release
Your Pit Bull will need to know when he's able to come back to your side. The release command will tell him when it's time to move from ‘stay.’ Once he is in the 'stay' position, show him a treat and use the word "release". The treats should be enough to motivate him to move. When he does, give the treat. Keep practicing this command so he understands when to stay put and when he can move freely.
Step
6
Rewards
Be sure you are rewarding your Pit Bull puppy with lots of tasty treats while he’s training. These will give him positive reinforcements and remind him as long as he is listening, he can earn rewards.
Step
7
Advanced
Once your puppy has these basic obedience commands well understood and is doing them consistently by command, begin to teach him other, more advanced commands such as 'watch me' and 'wait.'
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The Start with a Name Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Name the pup
When you bring a puppy home, especially one with such a strong personality, the first thing you will do is give him a name.
Step
2
Train name
To get to your puppy to recognize his name and when you are speaking to him, he’ll need to know his name. Say his name and give him a treat. Do this several times while sitting with him.
Step
3
Without attention
Once he’s heard his name a few times and has earned a treat just for listening to you say it, try to get him to recognize his name when he’s not paying attention to you. Start talking to him when he’s not looking at you. Say his name and watch his reaction. If he looks at you and gives you his attention, give him a treat. If not, try again later after more practice.
Step
4
Knows name
Once your Pit Bull puppy knows his name, start other training. Always use his name before teaching him anything to ensure you have his attention and he’s listening.
Step
5
Rewards
Always give your little guy rewards anytime he responds in a positive way to hearing his name. Use his name when you talk to him, when you need his attention, during training, and while on a leash. Be sure to have lots of treats on hand to reward him for listening.
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The Positive Attention Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Once home
As soon as your bring your Pit Bull puppy home, you can start playing with him and training him small tasks and commands. Start with his name. Reward him any time he listens and gives you his attention.
Step
2
Name
Spend a few weeks teaching your little guy his name. This should be something you use often. Say his name in a calm manner when you need him to pay attention.
Step
3
Commands
Once he knows his name, you can begin to train basic obedience commands starting with the easy command ‘sit.’ Use his name often and reward him through the training.
Step
4
Potty Training
It will take some time for your little guy to be totally house trained, but take advantage of this training opportunity to remind him of your expectations and reward him when he makes good choices.
Step
5
Socialize
An extremely important task in getting your Pitty to listen to you is getting him social with other people and animals, especially dogs. A social dog is a well-behaved dog. One who is not social might be cautious and not listen as well as you’d like.
Step
6
High-value treats
Remember, the tougher the task, the better the treat. Be sure to reward your puppy with treats for his good behaviors and when he listens to you. He’s more likely to keep listening if he knows he’s getting rewards.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Monico Tharpe
Pit bull
2 Months
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Question
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Monico Tharpe
Pit bull
2 Months

Sit stay the using the bathroom on
the floor

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rasheed, Sit and Stay methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit-and-stay For potty training, check out the crate training method. I suggest using the crate training method or a combination of the crate training method and the tethering method once pup is doing a bit better with just crate training method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Yayo
Pitbull Mastiff
7 Weeks
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Yayo
Pitbull Mastiff
7 Weeks

I’ve had yayo for two weeks now, I wanna train him to be a guard dog for my me and to follow just me when I say his name I would really appreciate if someone can give me some advice/tips on how to train him better!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, At this age I suggest focusing the most on socialization and basic and intermediate obedience. Socialization will help him learn what is normal human behavior vs. suspicious (You don't want him thinking everyone is suspicious and over-reacting or you won't be able to take him places with you). Intermediate obedience will help him learn to listen and obey around distractions, tuning things other than you out. Basic obedience is just necessary before moving onto intermediate - they build on each other. Look into how Service Dogs are trained. They are very well socialized as puppies. Once they get older they are taught to ignore distractions and focus just on their owners - this is usually done using positive reinforcement for teaching task training and commands, and sometimes fair discipline to modify any bad behaviors. Once pup understands what is normal and can ignore distractions, then work on teaching the specific guarding tasks you want to teach, such as barking at someone suspicious, standing between you and another person, keeping watch, ect... To teach him to follow you, check out the Reel In method from the article linked below. Practice Come and Heel on a long leash, starting in calm areas and gradually practicing in more and more distracting locations as pup improves. Let pup get slightly distracted by something like a smell and move away from them while holding the leash, tell them to Come, and Reel them in with the leash if they ignore you. Reward if they obey and praise as soon as they start to move toward you and when they arrive. Also, during the same training session practice walking away from pup while holding the long leash and if pup comes when you just say their name or don't say anything at all - because they were paying attention to you, give a reward when the arrive. The combination of Come, Heel, and rewarding attention that is given without you having to ask for it can help a dog learn to pay attention to where you are and follow you. Once pup has worked up to doing all of this in a distracting location, practice in lots of different types of locations to really solidify it...outside outdoor shopping areas, parks, outside dog parks (not in them though), in pet stores, and anywhere else he is allowed on a long leash. He must be social and not aggressive toward people to do this in though. Teaching Come - Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Turns method for teaching the basics of heel first: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Melo
Pit bull
5 Months
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Melo
Pit bull
5 Months

Potty training?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this guide has excellent tips for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. All of the methods are good. Take Melo outside often, even as much as every 30-60 minutes until he gets the idea. It may seem excessive but is worth it when they catch on in a matter of days or several days. Puppies always need to go immediately upon waking, after meals, after naps, after playtime, etc. Time it right and praise highly when success is achieved. Use an enzymatic cleaner to clean up accidents inside to completely remove the odor that only dogs can smell. This avoids repeat actions in the home. Good luck!

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Daisy
Pit bull
7 Weeks
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Daisy
Pit bull
7 Weeks

Daisy tends to bite me in the face. She hardly uses much force, but I'm afraid she might get accustomed to biting me. Also, she doesn't listen to me. I just got her a day ago

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lauren, Not listening to you right now is completely normal. She has not been trained to understand anything that you are saying yet. Be patient with her and work on teaching her what communication and words mean. I highly suggest enrolling in a Puppy Kindergarten class with her. That will help her learn to be friendly around other people and dogs while she is still young, and not to become suspicious or reactive toward them. For the biting in the face, check out the article that I have linked below. For the face biting, teach her what "Leave It" means using the "Leave It" method found in that article, and after she understands that command and can do it with objects, then tell her to "Leave It" whenever she tries to bite you in the face, and if she disobeys, then use the "Pressure" method to correct her for her disobedience. If she bites at your hands or arms, then you can also use the "Bite Inhibition" method to teach her how to control the pressure of her mouth. This will help her to learn that biting hard hurts and to practice being more gentle, rather than simply stopping completely before learning that. When she approaches four months of age, if she is still mouthing by then, switch everything to the "Leave It" and "Pressure" methods though, to stop all biting. Having lots of opportunities to play with other puppies under the supervision of a trainer or owners who know how to give the puppies breaks when they need it during a puppy class will also help her learn how to control the pressure of her mouth. Look for a puppy kindergarten class that includes some off-leash play time for the puppies. Some training groups and pet stores offer additional puppy play times during the week that are cheap or free also. Here is the link to the article I mentioned. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Solo
Pit bull
1 Year
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Solo
Pit bull
1 Year

We've had Solo since a pup and he's pretty good but at times he's he just doesn't listen. He's been jumping on people when they come into my place. I've been trying to teach him not to do this, but I've had no success. How can I fix this? What is the best approach to train him. He sits stays (somewhat), understands when we say no. But if he gets too excited, I can't get thru to him. Any advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Linda, Check out the article that I have linked below. Check out the "Step Toward" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Practice the "Step Toward" method with your own family and willing friends. When he no longer jumps on you when you come home, have the stronger members of the family who won't be knocked over practice this method and get him excited while they practice it. You can jump up and down and make silly noises to entice him to jump. When he jumps, step toward him then act boring and firm again. If he resists jumping, reward him with a treat. If he sits, even more treats. You want to practice times of excitement with him before guests arrive. As he improves, you can make the training even more exciting by holding things like treats and toys and moving them around - he only gets them for sitting though. If he jumps for them, he is corrected by stepping into him again to move him out of that space. Practice creative ways to test his resolve not to jump up and reward him for succeeding, so that he can handle guests later. When guests come over you can have willing guests step toward him, you can get between the guest and him and step toward him (which is claiming the person and telling him to respect their space on your behalf), or you can use the "Leash" Method from the I linked above. Instruct guests not to pet him while he is excited or trying to jump. If he sits for them, the guests can drop treats on the floor for him. When he is calm, they can greet him. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Blu Hussle
American Pit Bull Terrier
4 Months
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Blu Hussle
American Pit Bull Terrier
4 Months

Blu has been pretty good in training. He knows his name, he knows sit, stay (somewhat), he even knows give me paw but recently he started peeing in his cage or my floors instead of the pee pee pads, he also chews the pee pee pads. He knows to use the bathroom outside and when inside use the pads but recently he's just not listening. How do i fix this ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shakira, First, you need to try to figure out why he is doing it and adjust those things. It could be a couple of things: 1. The pee pads are confusing him. Some puppies will start out fine with pee pads and then start to confuse the pee pads with other soft surfaces at home, like carpet and rugs. The solution here is to get rid of the pee pads and teach him to potty only outside, or if you have to use an indoor toilet to set up an exercise pen in a specific area of the house and put a real grass pad in it and keep him in the exercise pen where he has access to the pad and not the rest of the house at this age, and take him potty outside while you are home - teaching him to only pee on grass through supervision and management. 2. Is he being taken outside often enough/how is the crate set up? If he is refusing to go potty on the pads (which can happen if puppies are confusing them with other things and trying not to potty on them because of the confusion), then he could be having accidents because he is in the crate too long without another place to pee in his mind. At this age the most he can hold it in the crate without being forced to have an accident due to bladder size is 4-5 hours at a time during the day. Any longer than that and he will have an accident. If that's the case you can try setting up an exercise pen with a real-grass pad instead of pee pad, or my suggestion that would be less confusing to him would be to hire a dog walker or friend to take him potty outside midday if you are gone to work 8 hours. Pay attention to his crate set up. Is there anything soft or absorbent in the crate, like a dog bed or towel? If so he is going to associate that absorbent thing with pottying because of the pee pad training, or simply just not be motivated to hold it in there because the soft thing absorbs the accident - many puppies won't potty train in the crate if there is something absorbent in it like a bed - check out www.primopads.com for another non-absorbent bed type option if you need one. Cot type beds are also good for outside the crate - like in an exercise pen. Also, how big is the crate? The crate should only be big enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lie down. If it's so big he can potty on one end and stand in the opposite end away from it to avoid the accident it won't motivate him to hold it in there. 3. He could have a medical issue like a urinary tract infection that would cause him to need to pee a lot. Does he pee often even if you tether him to yourself with a leash - having an accident after just 2 hours or so if you don't take him potty? If so it may be worth a trip to your vet because he would need medication to clear that up and the behavior to improve. Peeing due to a urinary tract infection of other medical issue he would have less control over it so may not make it to the pads or be able to hold it in the crate - I am not a vet though so check with your vet if it sounds like it could be that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bruno
pitbull
11 Months
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Bruno
pitbull
11 Months

Bruno jumps up on people a lot, barks at children, and if I leave him out of his crate he chews up EVERYTHING!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aleesha, First of all, when you cannot supervise him he absolutely should be crated. It is normal for a dog to need to be crated until 1-3 years of age because of chewing. One of the ways you teach good chewing habits that are not destructive is by confining a dog with a safe and interesting chew toy, like a food stuffed Kong, when you cannot supervise them, to prevent long term chewing habits from forming, until they grow out of the natural chewing phase of puppihood and adolescence. Check out the article linked below on chewing for more tips on things you can do to help the process along in the meantime: Chewing: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ For the jumping, check out the article linked below and follow the "Step Toward" method first. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump The barking could be excitement or a lack of socialization. If a lack of socialization, work on pairing the presence of kids with good things like treats when he is being quiet (do not reward him while he is barking, wait until he calms down for at least one second, and quickly reward him then)...also, reward him for staying calm around kids, not reacting badly to begin with when you notice kids are around, and focusing on you. Kids and dogs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n0_27XY3z4 If he is excited, then work on the Quiet command, and work on rewarding calmness and focus on you through exercises like a focused, structured heel in the presence of kids. Use the "Quiet" method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eli
Pit bull
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Eli
Pit bull
8 Weeks

What’s a good place for him to become social or in that type of environment

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Daii, Check out the free pdf e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy that can be downloaded at the link I have included below. That book goes over details on socialization and ideas for how to do it, including a good puppy class with the right safety measures to avoid disease risk while young, friends' homes, public places where you can carry him to prevent disease exposure from the ground. You can take pup almost anywhere dogs are allowed - but before his puppy shots are done you just have to carry him in areas where dogs may have been since most pup diseases are picked up from contact with the ground where other dogs have been. A good puppy class should clean the floors well before class, require pups to be current on shots (even if not finished), and non-class dogs kept out of the area, and pup carried there to avoid the ground on property where other dogs have been. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior's position on socialization and safety: https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
Bully
7 Months
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Duke
Bully
7 Months

I just got him. Tomorrow will be 2 weeks. We first took him out on a leash. He did good so we started just taking him out without a leash. Now if we take him out without a leash he just starts running and won’t listen. We have to chase him. So now it’s back to a leash. How can I get him to listen when I yell
For him?? He literally acts like he can’t hear me.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
86 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you the steps to teach "recall". STAGE ONE – 'Catching' or Charging Up the 'Come' Cue Start in a distraction free environment so that your dog can focus only on you. Whenever your puppy or dog is coming to you on his own, wait until he is a couple of feet from you and then say his name and the word 'come.' When he gets to you, make a big fuss. With this exercise, your dog will learn that coming to you is a really good thing. After a while, you can lengthen the distance between you and start using the word when he is coming to you from a greater distance. Coming to you should always be rewarded, whatever the circumstance and no matter how long it took your dog to respond. Motivate your dog to come by being exciting, running away from him, waving a toy, or having delicious food for him when he gets to you. This will show him that coming back to you the best thing he can do. STAGE TWO – Solidifying the Cue Through Play Make sure you play the Back and Forth game with another person that your dog is comfortable with. Start the game in a quiet environment so it is easy for your dog to focus on you. Hold your dog back while the other person calls him excitedly. Try not to use his name or the cue word but talk excitedly to ‘gee’ him up. Do not release him until the person calls his name followed by the cue word “come.” When the cue word is given, release your dog and let him go running to the person calling. As soon as he reaches them they should praise and reward him with a game of tug or a food reward. When your dog has had his reward, have the other person hold him back as you call him and release as you say his name followed by the cue word. When he comes to you reward him with another game of tug or food reward. Repeat this game back and forth but only do a few repetitions so your dog does not get bored or too tired. Keeping it fresh means the game is always fun to play. STAGE THREE – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Inside Now your dog knows what the word “come” means you can use the cue word to call him to you while adding a hand signal to the word. Hand signals are always good to build with vocal cues so that even if your dog cannot hear you he will understand what the hand signal means. This is good if your dog is a distance away from you. Start in a quiet environment. Walk away from your dog and call his name followed by the cue word and a hand signal. Praise and reward him when he comes to you. Start increasing the distance you call him from and praise for his compliance. If he does not respond, go back to the previous distance and repeat. Only practice this cue for a few minutes so your dog does not get bored. The secret to success is to always keep it fun, exciting and fresh. When your dog recognizes the hand signal, try calling his name and using the hand signal by itself without the vocal cue. You will then be able to use a combination of vocal cue only, hand signal only and the two together. Now your dog knows what the cue word means you can start to call him from different rooms or from areas where he cannot see you. This will encourage him to respond even when you are out of sight. STAGE FOUR – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Outside Now your dog is consistently coming to you in a distraction free environment you can proof your recall cue by taking it outside. Practice the recall in your yard and then gradually build up to the point where you can use it in the park or similar environment. The ultimate test is to use the recall when your dog is engaged in a different activity. Wait for a lull in that activity and then call your dog to you. Praise his decision to comply.

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Zoe
pitbu
9 Weeks
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Zoe
pitbu
9 Weeks

Zoe seems to be very stubborn and like to nip a lot. First couple of weeks the biting seems to be painless but recently its kinda strong bite. We did tried to distract zoe with toys but i doesn't last long. And when we try to communicate zoe seems not interested. When she listen she get the treat zoe will walked away and concentrate chewing the treat and only come back when finish.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Hello, try giving Zoe teething toys with texture - she may be more interested in those as a way to soothe her gums. As well, read this guide through - there are great tips. I would work on the "Leave It Method" which will come in handy in many instances: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. If you want Zoe to not bite, say leave it. If she is on a walk and goes to eat rocks, say leave it, etc. As well, this is an excellent guide: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-2. Read the entire guide and consider the Positive Encouragement Method. Make sure you are taking Zoe out for lots of exercise. She'll need it as she will only get more energetic as she grows. Once the vet says her vaccines are up to date, take her for a few walks every day, making sure that at least one of them is long and brisk. Take her for puppy training as well. That will help stimulate her mind and tire her out, too. Good luck and happy training!

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Bishop
Pit bull
6 Months
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Bishop
Pit bull
6 Months

He listens very well. especially when he wants treats. However he has become very needy and barks a lot when left alone. Very calm when i am in his sight. knows not to get his food until i tell him. very good at making eye contact with me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello KT, I suggest teaching pup commands that build independence like Place, crate manners, and distance down stay using a long leash. Practice these commands often while you are home and work up to pup being able to stay on Place or in the crate with the door open for up to 1 hour while you walk in and out of the room they are in. Practice down-stay from a distance using along leash to keep pup safe and further back from you. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Crate manners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 Work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. When pup is doing well., if you are not currently leaving often during the week due to quarantine, practice going on walks without pup - so you are leaving the house without them and working up to being gone for longer. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sherlock Holmes
Pit bull
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Sherlock Holmes
Pit bull
8 Weeks

Im not sure what to do about walking my puppy he only had his Frist set of shot so in scared to walk him outside people in my area leave they dogs to use bathroom off leash scared he might catch something plus we live in an apartment so he has potty pads i carry him to socialize him out in house i walk him on leash so he can stil get use to walking. Like 3 times a day for 5 mines and play games and teaching him sit but worried he not getting right amount of exercise how can i help him tell he get all his shots

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
86 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The vaccination conversation is a tricky one. Usually whatever advice you get will contradict the last persons. I have always understood that after the second set of shots, dogs are typically ok to begin socializing. But I don't know what vaccines your dog received, and I also don't know where you are located. So I don't want to give you poor advice. I would talk to your veterinarian directly about this topic. Socialization is so important at this age. So just use your discretion. You can interact with as many people as you want, you will just have to be careful about other dogs.

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