How to Train a Pomeranian to be Calm

How to Train a Pomeranian to be Calm
Easy difficulty iconEasy
Time icon1-2 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

Like the shorter haired Chihuahua, the Pomeranian ranks at the top in popularity when it comes to owners with small dogs. These wonderfully pampered and prideful pooches are small in stature but large in heart. With loyalty that is often very fierce and an eagerness to be with their special person, it’s not often that a Pomeranian can be discouraged from living it up in the lap of luxury. Poms, as they’re often affectionately named, are full of spirit, but that may often come with the condition of also being full of energy.

Small breeds tend to appear a little bit hyperactive, hopping up and down and bolting back and forth inside the home. Whether the excess energy is because of excitement, or simply because they don’t have enough room to really channel it into something more productive, even smaller dogs can prove to be a handful when they just won’t calm down. Being able to tell your Pomeranian to take a breather may help you get a better grip on your sanity.

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Defining Tasks

Most of the time, excess energy can be due to lack of exercise. But other times, it can just be because of bad doggy manners. Without realizing it, we often reinforce bad behavior and continue to feed it, which may begin to present a problem later on. A Pomeranian can often reflect the temperament of the owner as well, which means taking a look at yourself to determine what might need to change in order to get some quiet time.

Pomeranians of any age can be taught to calm down, though any outdoor exercise will have to hold off until after your playful pup receives his vaccinations. With some repetition and sorting of routines and boundaries, your dog can easily flick that switch in his brain that tells him it’s time to settle down in a week or two. It may just take some extra time and patience on your end to move the process along effectively.

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Getting Started

First, you’ll need to set aside some time through the day to get some exercise in for your Pom. Exercise is one of the most effective methods of calming a hyper dog down, so being able to dedicate at least thirty minutes out of your usual schedule can surely make a difference.

Once you’ve done that, find a space in your home or a doggy bed where your Pomeranian can settle in when it’s time to calm down. Keep this in the same spot every day and gather some treats to help encourage its use on a regular basis. Consistency is key and a tasty treat will never go amiss.

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The Ignoring Method

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1

Watch for poor manners

Some Poms have a tendency to get boisterous or pushy during play time. Keep an eye on yours in order to catch the bad behavior when it happens.

2

Stop play time when things get too crazy

If your Pomeranian shows signs of not knowing how to play appropriately and uses tactics like jumping up or pawing aggressively, take a step back and end play time to let her know that her behavior is not tolerated.

3

Don’t acknowledge bad behavior

Even negative attention may be seen as encouraging to a poorly behaved dog. Nip this problem in the bud by not looking at, touching, or talking to your dog for a few moments.

4

Wait for the pause

Your dog will likely stop and stare at you, expecting play time to continue. Wait until she has calmed down in order to assess the situation before turning back to her.

5

Resume play when appropriate

Once she is calm, you may continue to play with your Pom. This will help her recognize that play time will only happen when she plays appropriately.

The Work Out Method

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1

Schedule your exercise

Set aside a certain time each day for some exercise. For your Pomeranian, this can be as little as thirty minutes a day or as much as an hour or two. Determine his energy level to decide how much exercise he might need per day.

2

Play inside games

Use your dog’s size to your advantage! Play small games of fetch inside the home or play with other toys such as tug toys to keep things fun and exciting, even if the day is spent indoors.

3

Practice tricks

Your Pom may need some mental stimulation to go along with his exercise. Practice fun tricks or obedience commands to keep him distracted and busy!

4

Go for a swim

If your pup is particularly fond of the water, get a small kiddy pool and set it up in the backyard for him to go for a swim. Always remember to supervise him around any water, as toy breeds may not be the best swimmers.

5

Try a sport

Even small dogs can excel at some sports like agility or flyball. If your Pomeranian is the athletic sort, consider involving him in a dog sport! This will burn tons of energy and make sure he stays active and healthy.

The Quiet Space Method

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Designate a quiet area

Find a quiet space in your home that you can use for your pup to relax and settle down. This should be in a room away from the normal hubbub of the day.

2

Set it up for comfort

Place a doggy bed or some blankets down to make the space cozy and inviting.

3

Encourage quiet time

Offer treats to encourage your dog to use this space to calm down. Reward him for staying in the area for a little while by either offering affection or small treats. There should be good associations with the area.

4

Share your energy

Pomeranians may often share the energy of their owner in the moment, and yours may do this as well. Settle down with your dog when you are calm and it may help him calm down as well.

5

Schedule quiet time every day

Have a certain time of day when you can have your pup go into the quiet space for quiet time. A regular routine will help him know when it is time to settle in and take a break.

By TJ Trevino

Published: 03/07/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Henry

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Pomeranian

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9 Months

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Question

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He is toilet trained, but he is marking certain areas with strong smelling urine. Can’t seem to catch him doing it. How do I stop him with this ? I’ve tried punishment ie: showing him then putting him in the garden for a short while. Also letting him know I’m angry by ignoring him for a while. But he just keep going back to these same areas and doing it again. I’ve also cleaned with a product bought from pet shop with a smell to deter them. But to no avail !

April 6, 2022

Henry's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Caroline, First, when you are away and asleep, I would crate pup. When pup is not crated, also keep him tethered to you between potty trips using a 6 or 8 foot leash. Have him wear a belly band - which is a sling/diaper for male dogs that catches urine, and when he tries to lift his leg to mark, clap your hands loudly three times. Use a cleaner than contains enzymes specifically to remove the smell from any new or previous accidents - since lingering scent will only encourage more marking and only enzymes fully remove the smell. Look on the bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Many (but not all) pet cleaners contain enzymes. The belly band will keep marking from being fun and successful for him and stop the spreading of the smell - which encourages more marking (and keep your things clean). Attaching him to yourself with the leash will keep him from sneaking off to pee uninterrupted, and clapping will make peeing unpleasant for him without it being too harsh. Reward him with treats when he potties outside so he understands that pottying outside in front of you is good, it's only inside where he shouldn't do it. If pup isn't neutered I would also consider neutering. Neutering alone doesn't often fix this issue but an intact male will have an especially strong desire to mark, so neutering can make training easier. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

April 7, 2022

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Joy

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Pomerian

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9 Months

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Question

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How to control is bad habbits.Like really eager for sex playing with leg and bitting habbit

Oct. 7, 2021

Joy's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ankit, I recommend teaching Leave It and Out first. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command - this command can also be helpful for times when pup is very persistent. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s I would teach pup those commands, then use them to direct pup to more appropriate behaviors, like a dog food stuffed chew toy or practicing some obedience commands with you to build trust and respect and get pup in a working mindset and out of the overly-aroused mindset pup is in while humping your leg. If pup doesn't obey, I would either use the section on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushiness found in the out article, to walk pup out of the room, or use something like a unscented air pet convincer to interrupt pup by spraying a small pup of air near pup's side, while calmly saying "Ah Ah". Don't use citronella and don't spray in the face. Reward pup once pup displays a behavior you do want pup doing instead of the humping, like sitting, lying down, interacting with you calmly, ect... If pup is humping when you try to play, I would also teach more structured games instead of wrestling, since wrestling and tug games tend to increase arousal. Fetch, a flirt pole, obstacles courses like agility, and tricks are a few examples of other activities you can do. The flirt pole is still a bit arousing, but that arousal is usually directed more at the pole due to the distance between you and pup using the pole. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Oct. 8, 2021


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