How to Train a Pomeranian to be Calm

Easy
1-2 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Like the shorter haired Chihuahua, the Pomeranian ranks at the top in popularity when it comes to owners with small dogs. These wonderfully pampered and prideful pooches are small in stature but large in heart. With loyalty that is often very fierce and an eagerness to be with their special person, it’s not often that a Pomeranian can be discouraged from living it up in the lap of luxury. Poms, as they’re often affectionately named, are full of spirit, but that may often come with the condition of also being full of energy.

Small breeds tend to appear a little bit hyperactive, hopping up and down and bolting back and forth inside the home. Whether the excess energy is because of excitement, or simply because they don’t have enough room to really channel it into something more productive, even smaller dogs can prove to be a handful when they just won’t calm down. Being able to tell your Pomeranian to take a breather may help you get a better grip on your sanity.

Defining Tasks

Most of the time, excess energy can be due to lack of exercise. But other times, it can just be because of bad doggy manners. Without realizing it, we often reinforce bad behavior and continue to feed it, which may begin to present a problem later on. A Pomeranian can often reflect the temperament of the owner as well, which means taking a look at yourself to determine what might need to change in order to get some quiet time.

Pomeranians of any age can be taught to calm down, though any outdoor exercise will have to hold off until after your playful pup receives his vaccinations. With some repetition and sorting of routines and boundaries, your dog can easily flick that switch in his brain that tells him it’s time to settle down in a week or two. It may just take some extra time and patience on your end to move the process along effectively.

Getting Started

First, you’ll need to set aside some time through the day to get some exercise in for your Pom. Exercise is one of the most effective methods of calming a hyper dog down, so being able to dedicate at least thirty minutes out of your usual schedule can surely make a difference.

Once you’ve done that, find a space in your home or a doggy bed where your Pomeranian can settle in when it’s time to calm down. Keep this in the same spot every day and gather some treats to help encourage its use on a regular basis. Consistency is key and a tasty treat will never go amiss.

The Work Out Method

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Step
1
Schedule your exercise
Set aside a certain time each day for some exercise. For your Pomeranian, this can be as little as thirty minutes a day or as much as an hour or two. Determine his energy level to decide how much exercise he might need per day.
Step
2
Play inside games
Use your dog’s size to your advantage! Play small games of fetch inside the home or play with other toys such as tug toys to keep things fun and exciting, even if the day is spent indoors.
Step
3
Practice tricks
Your Pom may need some mental stimulation to go along with his exercise. Practice fun tricks or obedience commands to keep him distracted and busy!
Step
4
Go for a swim
If your pup is particularly fond of the water, get a small kiddy pool and set it up in the backyard for him to go for a swim. Always remember to supervise him around any water, as toy breeds may not be the best swimmers.
Step
5
Try a sport
Even small dogs can excel at some sports like agility or flyball. If your Pomeranian is the athletic sort, consider involving him in a dog sport! This will burn tons of energy and make sure he stays active and healthy.
Recommend training method?

The Ignoring Method

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Step
1
Watch for poor manners
Some Poms have a tendency to get boisterous or pushy during play time. Keep an eye on yours in order to catch the bad behavior when it happens.
Step
2
Stop play time when things get too crazy
If your Pomeranian shows signs of not knowing how to play appropriately and uses tactics like jumping up or pawing aggressively, take a step back and end play time to let her know that her behavior is not tolerated.
Step
3
Don’t acknowledge bad behavior
Even negative attention may be seen as encouraging to a poorly behaved dog. Nip this problem in the bud by not looking at, touching, or talking to your dog for a few moments.
Step
4
Wait for the pause
Your dog will likely stop and stare at you, expecting play time to continue. Wait until she has calmed down in order to assess the situation before turning back to her.
Step
5
Resume play when appropriate
Once she is calm, you may continue to play with your Pom. This will help her recognize that play time will only happen when she plays appropriately.
Recommend training method?

The Quiet Space Method

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Step
1
Designate a quiet area
Find a quiet space in your home that you can use for your pup to relax and settle down. This should be in a room away from the normal hubbub of the day.
Step
2
Set it up for comfort
Place a doggy bed or some blankets down to make the space cozy and inviting.
Step
3
Encourage quiet time
Offer treats to encourage your dog to use this space to calm down. Reward him for staying in the area for a little while by either offering affection or small treats. There should be good associations with the area.
Step
4
Share your energy
Pomeranians may often share the energy of their owner in the moment, and yours may do this as well. Settle down with your dog when you are calm and it may help him calm down as well.
Step
5
Schedule quiet time every day
Have a certain time of day when you can have your pup go into the quiet space for quiet time. A regular routine will help him know when it is time to settle in and take a break.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Koda
AnimalBreed object
4 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Koda
AnimalBreed object
4 Months

Potty Training
Biting
Exercise Schedule

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Austin, For potty training, check out the article that I have linked below if you plan to train Koda to go potty outside (which I recommend): https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside For indoor potty training, check out the article that I have linked below (I only recommend using this if you plan to do it long term - because it can be hard to undo. I also suggest using real grass pads for this): https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9286070160499116600&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=aud-645589642778:pla-568582223506&psc=1 For the biting, check out the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the exercise schedule, that depends largely on your puppy's temperament and energy level. Mental exercise is often more tiring for a dog than physical exercise, and training session are great for that. Walks where you practice obedience commands and heeling during the walk throughout the walk are also great. Check out the pdf e-book linked below: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Snow
AnimalBreed object
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Snow
AnimalBreed object
4 Months

How to start to be come down

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kavya, At this age I suggest teaching commands like Down, Place, and crate training pup. Give pup a dog food stuffed chew toy to teach them to self-entertain during calm times. Check out the free pdf e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy as well: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate To stuff a kong you can either place pup's dry dog food loosely in it and cover 1/2 of the opening with a larger treat - so the dog food will dispense more slowly, or place pup's food in a bowl, cover with water, let sit out until the food turns to mush, mix the mush with a little liver paste, treat paste, or peanut butte (avoid xylitol! - it's extremely toxic to dogs and a common sweetener substitute), place a straw through the kong's holes, loosely stuff the kong with the mush, place in a baggie, and free overnight. Remove the straw before giving pup and grab the kong from the freezer as needed - for a time-released treat. You can also purchase several durable hollow chew toys and stuff them at the same time so that you have a stash in the freezer to grab from as needed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Monkey D. luffy
AnimalBreed object
2 Months
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Question
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Monkey D. luffy
AnimalBreed object
2 Months

i cant find a photo, i dont know how on pc sorry. Our pom is really hyper and plays a lot during the day but its hard to get it in its cage at night, he goes in and we cant tolerate his sadness is it possible to get him to like his cage? It also doesnt eat its food unless there are treats inside. Is there a problem with the pom? we're new owners.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
94 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Sammy
AnimalBreed object
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sammy
AnimalBreed object
10 Months

I just got him last night he was very nasty smelly and full of fleas. He wont let me catch him i have to put a towel on him to catch him he nips at me he sakes all the time . I try and hold himm and tell him it going to be ok . What can i do to asue him it safe

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
94 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! It takes a little time for dogs to get use to a new environment. Sometimes as long as a month. In the mean time, you can try to lure him to you with really good smelling treats or peanut butter. The treats will create a positive association with you and he will learn that only good things come from you.

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Question
Simba
AnimalBreed object
4 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Simba
AnimalBreed object
4 Years

I have had him for two weeks and his last owner lives in a bed sit worked up to 16 hour a day so he is nervous re people and dogs and shows aggression but really he doesn't know how to act he could bit

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christine, For this situation I do recommend hiring a professional trainer to help you in person. Check out the article linked below for some tips on getting started with pup. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ Check out the videos below for more details on desensitizing pup to people. The below should only be done under the guidance of a professional trainer with such experience. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sRSu3xFjUw This is a later stage exercise for pup once they can do well with the other above scenarios: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Working and Obedience methods - this will also be an important part of the training, but pup needs to get to the point where they can interact with you more comfortably via some of the trips from the shy article linked above, first. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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