How to Train a Pomeranian to Pee Outside

How to Train a Pomeranian to Pee Outside
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Time icon2-4 Months
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

One of the great things about Pomeranians is that they are relatively easy to train. This holds true for potty training just as much as it does for basic behavior and tricks. The biggest thing to keep in mind is that your Pom will react far more readily to consistent training. Your Pom needs to be trained to go potty outside and he relies on you to provide the necessary training. This is where consistency truly pays off; if you keep changing your methods of training, your pup will remain confused and may never master the art of peeing outside. 

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Defining Tasks

The job at hand is to teach your Pom that going pee, or for that matter poop, in the house is not acceptable. However, you must have realistic expectations. Your pup is not going to master this vital skill overnight. By rule of thumb, a Pom puppy can hold themselves for "one hour per month of age" up to a maximum of six hours. An adult Pom can hold themselves for up to eight hours. You should never leave your pup for longer than eight hours. 

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Getting Started

The first thing you need is a way to restrict your pup's access to the house when you cannot be there to supervise him. The best way to do that is to use a training crate. This will be used when you can't supervise your pup or when you need to be gone for an extended period of time. Beyond this, you will only need a few extra supplies, including a leash and treats. For one method, you'll also need potty training spray, which is available at most pet supply stores.

Of course, along with these, you will need plenty of time and patience to work with your pup until this vital skill has been mastered. 

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The Scent Method

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1

Make it smell so good

Take a bottle of potty training spray and mark an area of your lawn with it.

2

Set the schedule

Using a timer, set up a schedule of taking your pup out every half hour. Every time it goes off, take your pup directly outside on their leash to the spot so they can go pee.

3

Let him wander

Give your Pom time a few minutes to go pee and when he does, be sure to give him a treat and praise him for doing a good job.

4

Take him in

If he doesn't go, that's fine, take him back in the house and try again in fifteen minutes. Again, if he goes, praise him and give him a treat.

5

Keep working it

The rest is all about continuing to work with your pup until they learn to hold themselves until you take them out.

The Timed Method

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Grab a timer

Grab a kitchen timer and set it to 30 minutes. When it goes off, take your pup out. If he goes potty, give him a treat and praise him.

2

Extend the time

Once he has mastered waiting for half an hour to go potty, it is time to start adding more time to the clock.

3

Be sure to treat

Be sure that each time your pup goes pee or poop outside, be sure to praise them and give them treats.

4

Keep a close eye on your pup

While your pup may be starting to get the idea, you need to keep a very close eye on them while they are in your house. At the first indication they need to go outside, be sure to take them straight outside so they can go, regardless of the timer. When they go, be sure to praise and reward them.

5

If he has an accident

If your pup happens to have an accident during the training process, don’t scold them for it. Unless you happen to catch them in the act, they will have no idea why you are mad at them. Simply use an enzymatic cleaner to remove all traces of the mess and keep working on their training until this is no longer necessary.

The Leash Method

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Choose a location

Choose a location in your yard for your pup to go potty.

2

Choose your cue

Choose a cue word such as "Outside" or "Potty" and use it every time you take your pup outside to go pee.

3

Grab the leash

Pop your pup on the leash so he knows it's time to head outside.

4

Give them the cue

Give your pup the cue and take him outside to go potty. When he goes, be sure to praise and reward him.

5

Routines are important

Routines are very important to your pup. Set a schedule of taking them to go out every half hour at first and take them out on schedule. Again, when they go, praise them and give them a treat.

6

Build their confidence

The rest is all about repetition, building his confidence, and his endurance. Take your time and your pup will soon learn where he is allowed to go potty.

By PB Getz

Published: 03/22/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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millie

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Pomchi

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Six Months

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Question

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she doesn’t come when called, i’ve tried calling her with a treat but she still doesn’t come.

Aug. 3, 2022

millie's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the Reel In method from the article I have linked below. Since she is such a small breed, if you can't find a lightweight enough long leash, you can also make your own using a poly rope with a core, adding a handle on one end (you will want to pad your handle end to avoid rope burn with thin rope or wear good gloves, and small rustproof clip on the other. A hard ware or climbing store will often have what you need. Look at the weigh rating for anything you use to make your own, to ensure can handle far more weight than pup could put on it, and use secure knots like a figure eight follow through to secure it. Example of poly cord with core: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-8-in-x-100-ft-Poly-Diamond-Braid-Rope-813234/314057289?source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=SHOPPING-RM-RMP-GGL-D29B-Multi-NA-WATERPIK-NA-SMART-NA-NA-MK581541800-NA-NBR-623-CON-NA-FY22_623&cm_mmc=SHOPPING-RM-RMP-GGL-D29B-Multi-NA-WATERPIK-NA-SMART-NA-NA-MK581541800-NA-NBR-623-CON-NA-FY22_623-71700000097259685-58700007902180421-92700071862301787&gclid=Cj0KCQjwuaiXBhCCARIsAKZLt3m4ziT8eZtEFqmYQPK93tD4qsiKSV_QBralHJcL1lEGa4JQivvlEmkaAofFEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 3, 2022

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Jazzy

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Pomeranian

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1 Year

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I try to take her out when she wakes up from naps, after she eats, etc. But there are times she nails the carpet, right in front of me. She can take upwards of 30 mins to go potty. And even then she has not gone, I cannot have a fence where I live, so I have to take her out, and even taking her for a walk around out trailer park she won't go.

July 9, 2022

Jazzy's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carolyn, I suggest going back to the basics with her for a couple of months and act as if she isn't potty trained at all to stop all accidents from happening so that she will develop a habit of holding it consistently while in the house and wanting to keep your home clean. After a couple of months if she has been completely accident free, very gradually give her more freedom - but when you start, still go outside with her at first to ensure she is going potty and not getting distracted. To crate train for at least two months to get her back on track more strictly at first, check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take her potty less frequently. I suggest taking her potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 3 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return her to the crate while her bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3-4 hours since her last potty trip. When you have to go off she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while she is getting used to it and longer once she is accustomed to the crate. Only have her wait that long when you are not home though, take her out about every 3-4 hours while home. The method will cover what to do to encourage her to go potty more quickly while outside, including giving her 15 minutes, then crating her and taking her back out again if she didn't go during that time - so going potty in the house instead of going while outside isn't an option, teaching the Go Potty command and rewarding with treats when she goes - to motivate her to go more quickly on command, using a potty encouraging spray on the area you are taking her potty to if needed, so the scent will encourage her to go, and talking her around slowly on leash - so the movement stimulates the urge to go. You want her to get into the habit of holder her bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever she feels the urge, or holding it while outside then going potty inside when she feels its convenient, and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If she is not already used to a crate expect crying at first. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past three days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" by using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward her quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Do NOT spray in the face - only side or chest. While home, you can also tether pup to you with a leash to prevent her from sneaking off to have an accident - this isn't quite as effective as crate training but you can combine the two a bit if you want pup to be out of the crate a bit more while you are home. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

July 11, 2022


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