How to Train a Pomeranian to Sit

Easy
2-3 Weeks
General

Introduction

Your Pomeranian is fluffy, fuzzy, and incredibly cute. He is also highly intelligent and eager to learn. With a personality twice the size as the dog, Poms enjoy fun and exciting training. You can turn many moments into learning moments with your smart pup. Training a Pomeranian to sit sets a foundation for basic obedience training. The command to sit is a command you will give your dog most often for his entire life. It will be a starting command you’ll give before most tricks, obedience or fun tricks.

Pomeranians are independent and strong-willed, so starting with an easy command such as 'sit' is a great place for reward-based training. Turn this command into an expectation for rewards such as treats or even tasty medicines such as heartworm pills. Having your pup sit before meeting new people or getting attention will help set expectations for good behavior for years to come. 

Defining Tasks

This basic obedience command is easy but still needs to be rewarding. Some dogs, especially small dogs such as your Pom, will find themselves in a sitting position before they even realize this is what you are trying to teach them to do. With practice, your pup will be conditioned to connect the command word "sit" with the action of sitting. This connection is made by rewarding the dog for achieving the position. Repetitive training teaches your dog what to expect, including the expectation of rewards for positive behaviors. This reinforcement training rewards good choices and redirects for poor choices. Starting basic obedience training with the 'sit' command sets a solid foundation for other training.

Your Pomeranian can be any age when learning to sit. If possible, start training as early as possible. Puppies train faster than adult dogs.

Getting Started

You’ll only need a couple of things to train your Pomeranian to sit. He’ll work hard for some tasty treats so be sure to have several on hand when training. Try to set aside some quiet time for training, free of distractions. Keep your training fun and engaging. If he’s not interested in training, he won’t work. Keep your pup interested by holding short sessions often instead of one long session each day. 

The Luring With a Treat Method

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Step
1
Stand or sit
Place yourself in front if your Pomeranian by sitting or standing. He’s a small dog, so you may find sitting comfortably in front of him holds his attention better.
Step
2
Treat
Hold out a treat to show your pup. This sets the stage for rewards to come.
Step
3
Command
Talk to your little guy and use the command "sit". He might not do much at this point, but it’s a good time to introduce the command.
Step
4
Lure
Hold the treat up over his head a bit and move it back behind his ears. You’ll notice him tipping his head back pointing his chin upward.
Step
5
Sitting position
As your dog tips his head back looking for the treat, he will naturally sit down. As soon as he does, say the command again and give him the treat as a reward.
Step
6
Practice
Keep practicing repeating the actions and command several times. After lots of practice, stop luring your little guy with the treat and only use the command to get him to sit down. Don’t forget to reward him each time.
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The Caught Sitting Method

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Step
1
Interact
Start playing with your dog with a toy. Interacting and keeping your pup engaged will keep his attention on you.
Step
2
Stop playing
While engaging with your pup, stop playing and look at him. Be patient as he ponders what you are doing.
Step
3
Sit
Don’t say anything just yet. Wait patiently for your dog to get bored and sit. He will most likely wait for you to keep playing and sit while waiting.
Step
4
Command
As soon as he sits, say the command with a cheerful, proud voice and give him a treat.
Step
5
Practice
Keep practicing getting your dog to sit by engaging him and then stop playing. Be sure to be patient as he waits and sits. Use the command to sit and give him a treat the moment he sits. With practice, he should be able to sit only by using the command.
Step
6
Only command
Once he can do this, start saying the command while you are playing together.
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The Play and Sit Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Toy
Pick a small toy and start playing with your Pom pup. During your playtime together, pause and wait for your pup to sit and patiently wait for the toy again.
Step
2
Pause and sit
When your pup sits because you are not engaging him in play, say the command ‘sit’ and give him a treat.
Step
3
Repeat
Keep playing and pausing intermittently. Say the command to sit earlier and earlier. Be sure to give your little guy a reward each time he is sitting.
Step
4
Practice
With practice, your Pom should start sitting as soon as he hears the command rather than only when you stop playing. Keep working with your pup, conditioning him to sit on command.
Step
5
Outside of play
Once he is sitting by command when you are playing, start to give the command at other times as well. You can ask your dog to sit before feeding him meals or when you come home at the end of the day before a greeting. Work on this command often.
Step
6
Rewards
Be sure to give your dog a treat each time he is successful.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 03/22/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months
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Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months

Hi, my 2 months Tephy doesn’t eat her wet food (boiled commercial dog food with mix of carrots). But when I mix a kibble in her bowl, she only eats that kibble not the wet. Maybe I should start to give her a solid food rather than the food she used to eat (boiled commercial dog food with carrots)???? Can I start to prepare a whole solid dog food or kibbles for her? (I’m just worried because her teeth is too small haha)

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
943 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stephanie Ann, Generally puppies can eat just kibble by 8 weeks of age. With her small size, you can purchase small dog formulas with smaller pieces. I recommend speaking with your vet about this. Since this is related to pup's health I would consult them. I am not a vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months
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Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months

Why Tephy is not eating her dog food? But when you use syringe she will then eat. Basically, she doesn’t eat by herself huhu. Or is it possible because her teeth is still too small?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Yes she may still be a little bit too young to eat dog food completely on her own. If you are using hard food, try mixing in some soft canned food, or water in with her meals until she gets a little bigger or starts eating on her own.

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Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months
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Tephy
Pomeranian
2 Months

Is it possible to train your small pomeranian puppy to go potty in a designated area like a litter box near on her crate and go potty outside as well? Because sometimes I didn’t have time to take her outside, so I put a litter box near its crate, tho I like to train her outside as well

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. You can use the same process for a litter box. Most dogs are successful with learning how to go both in a box, and outside. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

Wow, thank you. So is it possible that she can learn to potty inside, and when she is now familiar with it, then she can now be trained to go potty outside, right?

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yioshi
Pomeranian
7 Weeks
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yioshi
Pomeranian
7 Weeks

he don't now how to sleep in he's bed and he don't now how to sit.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your puppy is still pretty young and it will take some time for him to get use to sleeping in a bed. But he isn't too young to start learning training commands. Below are instructions for teaching sit. Get your dog’s attention and show your dog that you have a treat in your hand. Hold the treat just above your dog’s nose (not too high or your dog might jump). Move the treat back toward your dog’s ears, keeping it close to the head. Your dog's nose might turn up to follow the treat at first, but most dogs will sit when the treat gets to a certain point. As soon as your dog’s rear lands on the ground, say "yes!" or “good dog” in an upbeat tone (or, click your clicker). Immediately give your dog the treat followed by petting and praising. Repeat With Cue Word Repeat these steps until your dog sits at the sight of the treat above its nose. Next, add the cue word: Say your dog’s name followed by the word “sit,” spoken clearly while holding the treat in the position as before. Repeat several times, using the word "sit" each time and gradually phasing out the hand motion (keep using the treat, just phase out the motion). Continue to Practice Hold short training sessions throughout the day in various locations, both indoors and outdoors. This will naturally increase the distractions, but you want your dog to sit with any distractions present. End training session on a positive note (with a success). Be patient and consistent.

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Question
Koda
pomperanian
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Koda
pomperanian
2 Months

we have done everything to potty train her but she doesn't seem to understand. She also very hyper so every time we try to train her to sit she thinks we're playing with her.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you some pretty detailed information on potty training. Some of it you probably know, or have tried. Some of it will hopefully be helpful to you. As far as her energy level, her focus will improve with age. Sometimes at this age, it is only possible to get 5-10 minutes of focus out of them. And that is ok. As she ages and approaches 4 months, it will greatly improve. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior.

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