How to Train a Puppy to Respect an Older Dog

Medium
2-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Sammy is a 12-year-old black Lab that is starting to feel her age. She used to go for long runs with her mistress, but now she can’t keep up anymore. She is achy from arthritis and has lost a lot of muscle tone. Sammy's owner decides to bring home a new puppy so she can have company and protection on her morning runs. The new puppy, a German Shepherd named Mack, is adorable and energetic, but from Sammy’s perspective, disruptive, annoying, and disrespectful of personal space! Mack is constantly jumping on Sammy, chewing on her ears, nudging, licking and otherwise being a pain. 

Sammy is not impressed, at first she would get up and walk away, but lately, she has started growling at Mack. Sammy's owner has taken a lot of time to ensure both dogs get lots of attention and Sammy does not seem to be jealous, as much as she seems to be in need of peace and quiet when she wants it. Before this escalates any further Sammy’s owner needs to teach her new puppy to respect her older dog.

Defining Tasks

Introducing a new puppy to your pet family, when it already contains an older dog, can be a bit of a rocky road, especially if your older dog doesn't have the energy or the inclination to keep up with his little sibling. Sometimes pet owners misconstrue the interaction between their new puppy and their older dog, becoming alarmed when the older dog corrects the new puppy to set boundaries and enforce respect. If you reprimand your older dog because you misinterpret his behavior for being mean or jealous, when he is just teaching your new pup some manners, you can, in fact, create a problem, where the new puppy does not respect boundaries of other pets in the home. 

Often, allowing an older dog to establish respect themselves can resolve the issue, however, if your older dog is unable to exert himself or the new puppy is particularly boisterous, you may need to step in and train your puppy appropriate behavior with your older dog. Often, draining your new pup's energy by providing lots of play and exercise can help to control his behavior around your senior dog. Limiting access between the dogs with crates or barriers can also help establish boundaries. You should not punish your puppy for exhibiting boisterous, playful behavior--this is natural for puppies and punishing natural behaviors will only confuse your new puppy and create anxiety. Instead, limiting, correcting and redirecting playful behavior around your older dog, to establish personal space, boundaries, and respect will be more effective and provide a peaceful, comfortable environment for both your old friend and your new one

Getting Started

You will need to dedicate time to both your older dog and your new puppy in order to meet each dog's needs--your older dog’s need for quiet and your younger dog's need for activity.  Remember, you need to be the leader and not allow either of your dogs to take over this role, which can create an imbalance in the pack dynamic, resulting in a lack of respect for either of your dogs. This will require time, patience and confidence. Make sure you have lots of toys and treats to redirect your young dog, and establish a quiet retreat for your older dog where he will not be disturbed or harassed by a puppy demanding attention.

The Pack Leader Method

Most Recommended
6 Votes
Step
1
Teach obedience
You need to be the pack leader to enforce that all pack members treat each other with respect and everyone's needs are met. Work with both your older dog to review obedience commands, and your new puppy to establish obedience commands like 'sit', 'stay', 'come' and 'down'.
Step
2
Provide exercise
Exercise your new puppy...lots. Burn off as much of his playful energy as possible with walks and outdoor or indoor play so he does not irritate your older dog with demands for play and roughhousing. When possible, include your older dog in walks to establish a pack mentality for both dogs, with you as leader.
Step
3
Engage mind
Work your new puppy's mind. Give him puzzle feeders and interactive toys. Teach him tricks and reward with treats, reduce regular feed accordingly if lots of treats are being used. Give your young dog a job to do that matches his breeding. Is he a scent hound? Teach him to track. A herding dog? Let him herd small animals if possible. A pulling dog? Teach him mushing commands and to pull a drag. Keep your puppy occupied until he is old enough to work, practice agility, or whatever suits his breed and nature.
Step
4
Do not allow dominance
Do not allow either dog to overstep their bounds with regard to position in the pack. Older dogs can correct behavior towards themselves but do not need to exert influence over your puppy's other behaviors such as playing with other pets or household activities. Young puppies should not be allowed to continuously pester older dogs with demands for attention and play. Do not sympathize with one dog over another when correcting behavior, treat both equally, correct dominant behavior. An older dog should be able to defend his boundaries but not to “rule” over the younger dog and vice versa.
Step
5
Allow play
Do not interfere in play and roughhousing behavior where both dogs are engaged. Sometimes play may look aggressive, with mouthing and growling, but learn to distinguish between annoyance and aggression and playful behavior where both parties are willing participants. Allow dogs to share toys when playing but do not allow toys or bones to be owned by one dog or the other, as the owner/pack leader you should own all toys. However, when one dog has a toy, the other dog should not be allowed to take it. If this occurs, correct the dog who is transgressing and remove the toy.
Recommend training method?

The Correct Manners Method

Effective
4 Votes
Step
1
Provide a safe place
Set up an quiet area for your older dog with a blanket or bed in an out of the way place where your older dog is comfortable.
Step
2
Supervise
Supervise and intervene to correct behavior if the puppy wants to play and the older dog is trying to avoid him.
Step
3
Seperate
If the puppy is demanding attention that the older dog doesn't want to, or is not able to, provide, step in between your older dog and your puppy. Direct your older dog to his quiet place and distract your puppy by taking him to another part of the house and providing him with a toy.
Step
4
Enforce seperation
If puppy is still bugging the older dog, separate them. Use a crate to contain your puppy, or set up pet barriers or gates to either contain the puppy, protect the older dog, or block off certain rooms.
Step
5
Socialize
Give your puppy access to dogs the same age or slightly older than him. Allow play so that your puppy learns socialization from other dogs with similar energy levels to himself.
Recommend training method?

The Reinforce Respect Method

Least Recommended
4 Votes
Step
1
Reduce energy
Exercise and play with your pup to burn off some energy then bring pup on a leash near your older dog.
Step
2
Distract from older dog
When your pup notices your older dog, distract your puppy. Make a funny noise and call your puppy over. Ask him to sit or lie down and ignore the older dog.
Step
3
Reinforce respectful behavior
When your puppy sits, give him a treat. If you are using a clicker to mark behaviors, click to mark ignoring the older dog or say “yes”.
Step
4
Distract and reward
Bring out a toy and initiate a tug of war game. Remove toy and repeat previous steps. Repeat for about three games of tug of war for three sessions per day in sessions about 5 minutes long.
Step
5
Establish ignore behavior
Gradually increase the amount of time your puppy needs to ignore the older dog before getting a reward and play.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Laurie Haggart

Published: 03/07/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Jack
Lurcher (mongrel)
8 Years
4 found helpful
Question
4 found helpful
Jack
Lurcher (mongrel)
8 Years

My dog jack is 8 (almost 9) and we are thinking of getting another dog. He has always lived with another dog until about a year ago. The dog we have fallen in love with is a rescue bull breed cross. He is 8 months old and upon meeting jack, he was trying to get him to play by jumping on him. Eddie (the puppy) is quite large and jack is snapping at him trying to get him to stop. How can we resolve this so we can feel safe introducing them offlead at some point?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Keira, In this scenario the puppy is actually more than half the problem. When a dog jumps on a dog that has not indicated that it wants to play, the jumper is being rude and not responding to canine social cues. Be an advocate for your older dog and work on boundaries with the puppy so that Jack feels like he can relax around the puppy. Don't necessarily expect Jack to play with the puppy. He may never want to play with him and that's okay as long as they can peacefully coexist and simply enjoy each other's company. Work on obedience and structure with both dogs to help them listen and respect you and not compete with each other. If both dogs respect you and you make and enforce the rules then they don't have to - which can help prevent fights. Teach both dogs (especially the puppy) "Out" (which means leave the area). Use the command to let the puppy know when he should get out of Jack's space. Get in front of the puppy, point to where he should go, tell him "Out" and firmly but calmly walk toward him, making him back out of the area. Block him from going back until he gives up trying to get back there or leaves the area completely. When he gives up, return to the area yourself to see if he follows you. If he follows you, tell him "Ah Ah" and walk him out of the area again. Repeat this until he stops following you back in. When you want him to come back, tell him "Okay!". Doing out communicates that you want a dog to respect a certain space that belongs to you. It also tells them that a certain thing belongs to you and they should respect that also (a child or another dog typically). You can use "Out" for Jack too when he is behaving poorly toward the puppy. When Jack is being tolerant, give him treats (not right next to the puppy though because you want to avoid competing for food). When the puppy enters the room, feed Jack treats. When the puppy leaves the room, all treats stop - you want the treats to be associated with the puppy. Supervise the dogs and make sure they both have their own space. Crate training at least the puppy will help with that a lot. I also suggest teaching both dogs a good Place command so that they can simply get used to being in the same room with each other but be relaxing. Place can also help with self-control (for puppy), respect and calmness. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo#dialog Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bella
Daisy Dog
9 Years
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Bella
Daisy Dog
9 Years

We added two 11 week old litter mates to the house 5 weeks ago. They are showing pack behavior toward the older dog who has become fearful and aggressive toward them. Help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diane, I suggest that you hire a professional trainer who uses both fair corrections and positive reinforcement to come to your home. The new puppies likely generally need more structure and boundaries. All dogs need to look to you to make and enforce the rules, so that none of them will bully another dog. Right now they are likely vying for who is going to be in charge, and if the older dog is generally more timid personality-wise, then the puppies are probably taking advantage of that and finding it fun to pester the older dog. Puppies also just tend to be obsessed with older dogs and have not learned doggie manners yet. Following an older dog around and constantly trying to wrestle and play is normal - especially when that dog won't pay attention to them. That doesn't mean that it should continue but they are probably doing what comes naturally to them when there is a lack of boundaries to teach them otherwise. They need to be taught those manners by you so that your older dog doesn't have to use aggression to teach them. Once you are enforcing the rules, rewarding your older dog for being tolerant and calm, and giving the dogs more time apart, your older dog will likely begin to relax more. If not, you need someone to help you in person because the trainer will need to evaluate the dog's body language and interactions to see what's really going on. To start, crate train the puppies if you have not already done so. They need a calm place by themselves where they can chew on food-stuffed chew toys and relax. This is important. It is also important that they spend time alone to teach them to self-entertain and self-soothe, rather than be completely reliant on you or the other puppy's presence. Fill a hollow chew toy like a Kong with dog food that has been soaked in water until mushy, and mixed the food with a bit of liver paste, cheese or peanut butter (Avoid Xylitol sweetener -- it's toxic!). You can make several of these toys ahead of time and refrigerate or freeze them. They can even eat all of their daily food out of the Kongs and as treat rewards for obedience, and you do not have to use food bowls at all at this age. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your household rules for all dogs will be. Some examples are: "No pestering a dog that wants to be left alone", "No stealing another dog's food or toys", "No pushing another dog out of the way - usually to get food or attention", "No blocking another dog from getting to a space", "No claiming you by standing on your lap and acting aggressively or pushy towards another person or dog", "No acting possessive of furniture and keeping another dog from coming over", "No acting aggressive toward another dog or person", "No barking at another dog when he wants to be left alone". When one dog breaks a rule, you be the one to handle it so that the other dog does not have to. For example, if one dog steals another dog's toy, take the toy away from the thief, return it to the dog that originally had it, and make the thief leave the room. If one dog is trying to sneak over to another dog's food while he is eating (Do not free feed the dogs! - all food should be removed after fifteen minutes unless a dog is eating in the crate where another dog cannot bother him), then get in front of the sneaky thief, tell him "Out", point to where the dog should go, and walk toward him until he leaves the area. If he does not move when you say "Out" and start walking, don't be afraid to move him with your legs by walking toward him. Leaving is not optional for the dog. Shuffle your feet rather than lift them if you end up having to walk into him, so that you do not step on him while moving. When he is out of the area, block him from going back over to the other dog -- pretend like you are a soccer goalie or a brick wall. When the dog stops trying to get past you, return to the dog that's eating to see if the thief tries to follow you back. If he follows you, then repeat walking toward him until he leaves again. Repeat this process until you can stand next to the dog that's eating or leave the room, and the thief stays out of that area - away from the eating dog. When you are ready for the dog to go back into the area you told him to leave, then tell him "Okay!" in an excited tone of voice. You can use the "Out" command to teach the dogs to respect each other's space in other ways too. When one dog is bothering another dog, tell the problematic dog "Out!" in a firm but calm tone of voice, and enforce it like you did with the eating dog above. I also suggest teaching the puppies "Place" and practicing them each having a visible, consistent "Place" spot that they can go to and lay on with a toy and stay there. Finally, don't expect the older dog to play with the puppies. The goal here is peaceful co-existence. When the puppies are older and there have been more boundaries and less anxiety, the older dog might decide that she wants to play, but if that never happens and the dogs can peacefully hang around one another, that is still great. Older dogs and puppies play very differently, so not all older dogs will want to play with puppies. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Lucky
Labrador Retriever
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lucky
Labrador Retriever
9 Months

My method of attempting to get Lucky to stop bugging my chihuahua is when he does bark, I rush down and block him from the chihuahua. He now barks not only out the window (I have made some progress with him barking out the window), but he barks aimlessly, as in, he doesn't bark at anything, just makes a bark sound.

Is my method of blocking him from my chihuahua effective? I would like to try a positive reinforcement way, and a way that I can train him in advance instead of when he actually barks for my chihuahua.

I can't tell if this is boredom barking or barking for another dogs' attention, because either way, my chihuahua usually rushes down if she hears ANY dog bark. And talking about that,

I brought my chihuahua to the local dog park, and as expected, dogs started barking back and forth. If I could get my chihuahua to get along with other dogs and people (not the jumpy type like Lucky), I would be so grateful to have her at least keep her calm around strangers and other dogs, especially Lucky.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kien, It sounds like Lucky is bored and making up games to get attention. Since he's not allowed to bark out the window he is simply doing the same thing in a different location to get her attention. I suggest teaching him the "Quiet" command, rewarding him whenever you catch him playing calmly and nicely (and being quiet), and giving him something else to do besides bark. An AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor could be a good investment for him. It works by releasing a treat when it senses he is calm or quiet for a certain amount of time. You can also feed him his meals in food stuffed chew toys like Kong's, Kong wobble toys, or puzzle toys. Finally, you can correct the barking with a remote training device and collar like I mentioned in you last question about barking at dinner. To get Sweet Pea used to other dogs will be a long process honestly but it is doable if you are willing to put in a lot of work. Socialization is typically done while dogs are still puppies and haven't developed fear. It would involve taking her places with other dogs, rewarding her with her favorite treats, toys, and games whenever she sees another dog and stays calm (while the dog is far enough away for her to stay calm). I would also suggest practing a lot of obedience with her with dogs in the distance (such as heel, sit, watch me, and come) and rewarding her for obedience and focus. The training will keep her mind on you and get her in a following made with you so that she can trust you more and relax more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Pixie
Cross breed (springer spaniel, boxer, staffy)
16 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Pixie
Cross breed (springer spaniel, boxer, staffy)
16 Months

We have just got a dog from a shelter to go with our 9 year old dog. Everything is fine apart from she has very bad separation anxiety. We haven’t left her alone for more than 5 minutes ( we have only had her for 3 days) because she cries and claws st the stair gate if we go upstairs. We can’t even go into another room without her following- she is never settled.

We plan on crate training her, Is this the right thing to do? Also, what else can we do to help stop the separation anxiety?
Thank you, keira

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello keira, Crate training is usually very good for dogs with separation anxiety. It can be harder on the person to watch the dog work through it, but dogs with separation anxiety need opportunities to practice independence and self-soothing. So crate training if done correctly can be great. Check out the article that I have linked below to introduce the crate. I typically recommend the "Surprise" method but you can use all three methods at the same time. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate You will also want to work on commands that require her to stay, be further from you, and be calmer. "Place" and teaching a dog to stay in a crate with the crate door open (once you have introduced the crate) are also good exercises for this: Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 Work up to having Pixie stay on Place or in the crate for up to an hour. Start with shorter amount of time and gradually work up to longer, then work up to her staying there even when you walk out of the room and around the house. Outside, practicing Down and Sit Stays from a distance using a long leash is also great. In addition to those things walks should be pretty structured, where she is heeling by your side and not ranging ahead or distracted. Dogs with anxiety tend to do well with structure and boundaries and need time to practice independence. Those types of exercises give them opportunities to work through their anxiety while you are guiding them, and eventually build their confidence. At first, it can seem like the anxiety is worse because they are having to deal with their anxiety, but as they work through it, you should see more improvement little by little. I suggest starting with the above training. Those things might be all that you need to change her state of mind over the next few months. If you find she is still having a hard time, check out the link below for more intensive training. https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2013/02/21/separation-anxiety-im-not-seeing-it-at-my-place SolidK9Training also has a few videos on YouTube that touch on Separation Anxiety too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Peach
Cocker Spaniel
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Peach
Cocker Spaniel
6 Months

I have been issues with my puppy these days a lot more lately, she had become overly jealous about me, if my older dog comes near me she immediately attacks her in a vicious way. I have been trying a lot of corrections, I was wondering how can I reverse this or prevent it to get worse?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jacqueline, It sounds like pup is resource guarding you, which is partially an issue with pup not respecting you - dog's who resource guard tend to think that they own whatever they are guarding - which is you in this case. Work on building pup's respect for you and desensitizing pup to your other dog's presence around you. I suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression for this process. Look for someone who comes well recommended by their previous clients who had similar issues. Teach pup respect building commands like heel, down, place, and have pup work for everything they get in life right now. Check out the working method from the article linked below for details on how to do that. Also check out the consistency method and obedience method and be implementing the tips from those as well. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Attach pup to a leash and tether the leash to something secure, practice having your other dog walk past at a distance from you and your dog (who should be tethered and in Down or on Place - not touching you), and reward your dog for ignoring the other dog passing by and being tolerant. Your attitude should be calm and business-like and confident during this. As pup improves, gradually decrease the distance that your other dog passes. Work with a trainer to further build pup's respect, correct in appropriate ways during outbursts, and desensitize pup to your other dog walking past, coming to you, and working with you. Place, Down, Leave It, and Out - which means leave that area are all very important commands for your puppy to know right now. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Patches
Cocker Spaniel
10 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Patches
Cocker Spaniel
10 Years

My daughter just brought home a one year old lab who will not leave our cocker alone, she wants to play constantly, we have balls, bones, chew toys, we walk them, play in the yard she never stops he’s ( our cocker ) is getting frustrated and snapping, my daughters lad wants whatever he has even if the both have the same thing. I want to fix this before somepuppy gets hurt.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kim, The lab needs to be taught "Leave It" and "Out" commands. Check out the "Leave It" method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite She also needs a lot of structure and boundaries. Learning a Place command, crate manners, a structured heel, and other things that build self-control. You cannot change personality but you can stimulate her mentally and teach better self-control to help her focus her energy on the things you want her to focus on instead. The pestering is normal. Young dogs have to be taught to be respectful. That doesn't mean it's okay, just not surprising. When she tries to pester Patches you can also enforce the leave it command for Patches - if she continues biting or pestering her after being told Leave It (which you must teach first), you can get between her and the Patches (carefully, if there is aggression keep a drag leash on her and use that to redirect), tell her "Out", and firmly walking toward her until she backs all the way out of the room. Block her from getting back to them, then when she calms down or leaves, go back to what you were doing before. If she goes back over to them again without being told "Okay!" first, then repeat walking toward her until she is out of the area, while saying "Out" in a calm and firm tone of voice. Repeat this until she gets realizes you mean business and leaves Patches alone. At first, expect to have to repeat this a lot. The more consistent you are, the sooner she should realize you mean what you say. Here are some commands to practice to increase her respect for the humans in the household and her self-control. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo When there are two dogs in a household together it is very important for both dogs to trust and respect the owner so that the owner is the one making and enforcing house rules for both dogs - and not the dogs trying to do that for each other, which could lead to fights. Advocate for your older dog by working on self-control and commands that teach the lab to leave it and get Out of the area, so that your Cocker does not feel the need to defend herself. When both dogs are being tolerant (Patches) and calm (the lab) remember to calmly reward both with a treat or calm praise. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Maverick
Cocker spaniel x
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Maverick
Cocker spaniel x
3 Months

When we take Maverick to a puppy play session to socialise with other puppies he either tries humping them or just jumps all over them. Even the owner has said he's quite boisterous. When it happened last Saturday we removed him but he goes straight back to do the same thing. We call him away get him to sit, lay down, give paw to distract him but he will still go back and do it again.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sherry, He likely lacks social manners, which is even more reason why he needs the puppy play. It will take a lot of repetition for him to learn self-control and to connect that play time ends with his roughness. The average dog takes thirty repetitions before they learn something new and puppies have even less attention. Continue interrupting his play and refocusing his attention, then letting him go back to playing only when he is calm. Also, when you interrupt his play use the "Out" command (which means leave the area) and use your body to herd him out of the area so that he learns spacial awareness also. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ At first expect him to get excited when you herd him away from the other puppy after saying Out. Stay firm, calm and persistent until he calms down and complies, blocking him from going back until he calms down and looks at you or away from the other puppies. It will take repetition for him to realize what you are doing (wanting him away from the other puppy) and why it is happening (he was too rough). When he is calm, if the other puppy wants to play, let him back by telling him "Okay" or "Go Play". Many puppies or dogs will hump as a way to pester another dog into playing. It is simply over excitement and poor social skills most of the time at this age. The puppy is also probably a bit dominant and pushy too, so structure and consistent rules for this pup while growing up will be important. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Coco
Bull mastiff
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Coco
Bull mastiff
12 Weeks

How do i know when to intervene playtime between my 11 week old puppy and 9 year old dog? Like how do I know the older dog has had enough and when it has started to become aggressive and not just playing?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Luke, Sometimes an older dog's body language will start to show it. The older dog will become less patient, a bit rougher, or try to get away from the puppy. When it doubt, remove the puppy, let both dogs calm down, then tell your older og "Okay" and invite him to play with your puppy again. If he wants to continue playing, great, you can let them. If he doesn't want to initiate playing, then make the puppy give him space. He has had enough for now. The key is to watch the older dog's body language and see if he wants to initiate playing, opposed to puppy starting it when in doubt. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Tillie
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Tillie
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks

Our female 9 week puppy is trying to bite at our male 3 year old dogs face. We are very worried that the older dog will lash out and hurt her when she gets a hold of him. They both play rough and our older dog is showing some dominant behaviors but always is the one to initiate play. We don't want either one to get hurt badly so how do we stop the puppy from biting at the face?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tillie, First, I suggest joining a puppy kindergarten class that includes time for moderated off leash play, where the trainer has owners interrupt the play when puppies start to get too rough or overwhelmed. Puppies play with each other differently than adult dogs and playing with puppies helps a pup learn to be gentler with their mouth because of the feedback they get from other puppies ("If you bite me too hard I yelp and stop playing" for instance). In addition to bite inhibition (controlling the pressure of a bite) a puppy class provides socialization with people, obedience, and new experiences - all of which are vital for puppies. Look for a class that requires all of the pups to be up to date with vaccines for their age, cleans the floor with a cleaner that kills parvo and distemper right before class, and prevents other potentially -un-vaccinated dogs from entering the puppy area once things have been cleaned. Carry your puppy into the cleaned area to avoid the ground where unvaccinated dogs may have been, and when you take her potty, choose an area where other dogs are not very likely to have gone - even if that means walking a good bit away from the building. Taking these measures helps minimize the risk of puppies catching diseases and allows you to join a class earlier, before the key socialization period ends at 12-16 weeks of age. Check out the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior's view on puppy socialization and age precautions. https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf Check out the article linked below and follow the "Bite Inhibition" to further help puppy learn to be gentler with her mouth at home: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Finally, work on teaching an "Out" command to both dogs (which means get away from the area you are in). Use this command to enforce Tillie leaving your older dog alone when things get too rough, and your older dog leaving Tillie alone when needed. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ If you don't trust your older dog to be patient with the puppy, then do not let them play together. Tillie can get the socialization she needs from playing with other puppies. If your older dog is likely to lash out, it would be better for her to learn to simply be calm around your older dog, and for your older dog to do the same. Work on Out with both dogs, as well as Place, and stay to redirect them when they start to get rough. Give them structured things to do together like heeling on the leash and practicing obedience commands together. Dogs in the same household do not have to play together, they can simply learn to hang out and be calm when playing together may create other issues for those particular dogs - you don't want a dog that is likely to lash out at a puppy to teach the puppy through aggression to be unsocial with others also - that is how poor social skills get passed on to dogs in the same household. When you cannot supervise the dogs together, have Tillie spend time in a crate or exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong and other fun and safe toys, so that she cannot pester your older dog without you there to redirect and help them learn. As she gets older, calms down, and learns the house rules, you can give her more freedom if the dogs are doing well together. Confinement when you cannot supervise is also important for potty training and preventing destructive chewing - which can actually get worse again around 5-7 months due to jaws developing at that time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bear and Jewel
Havanese
13 Weeks
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Bear and Jewel
Havanese
13 Weeks

We have an 8 yr old dog and we brought home a puppy who is now 13 weeks old. My older dog Jewel can’t stand it when the puppy Bear jump and bites her ears, tail and face. The problem is that Jewel will very rarely growl to correct the behaviour so Bear will just keep going until I have to remove him. We have done the “trade” method where we trade him a chew toy to distract and we make a weird noise to get his attention however this isn’t working. Do you have any suggestions? I feel really bad for our older dog.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cassandra, I suggest teaching an "Out" command - which means leave the area. If she doesn't listen to your Out command when you use it, after you have spent time teaching it so that she understands, then use your body language to enforce the command by getting between the puppy and your older dog and calmly but firmly blocking your puppy from behind able to get to your older dog, then walking toward your puppy until she backs out of the area where your older dog is. Expect to have to do this several times in a row for her to give up and respect boundaries whenever you do this - at first. The more consistent you are about doing it and enforcing your Out command, the better her listening skills should improve with that command. By using your body language this way you are essentially "claiming" your older dog and telling her to respect his space even if he doesn't do that himself. Be patient and persistent, this will take time and practice to teach, but is a very useful command to have. Check out the article linked below for steps to teach Out and for how to enforce Out to improve pushy behavior Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
Anatolian Pyrenees
13 Weeks
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Max
Anatolian Pyrenees
13 Weeks

I have an older dog, Maggie, who will play with Max, but they roughhouse. Max is the breed type that fights and won’t stop. Maggie tries to get him to stop but he won’t. It’s gotten to the point where we are afraid Maggie might hurt him. She’s tried to hurt other dogs before, so this wouldn’t result in a good thing. When we try to get Max away from Maggie, he will consistently lunge at her and try to play or fight. I usually try to make him sit down, but when I did that the last time, he tried to bite me. He’s also aggressive and will bite me and try to attack me. What should I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Allison, You need to hire a trainer to help you train Max to a high level of obedience and create more structure in his life. He should learn to calmly coexist with Maggie and never to play with her. He needs to learn a solid, long, high distraction Place command, a Leave It command, an Out command, and generally have a lot more structure in his life. Since you said he acts aggressively toward you, the issue with Maggie is just one symptom of his need for more boundaries, respect, structure, and obedience. I highly suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with driven breeds, aggression, large breeds, strong-willed dogs, who comes well recommended, uses positive reinforcement and fair corrections both. Max needs to work for everything he gets in life for a while and essentially be in doggie boot camp, heeling, staying on place, doing commands before he gets anything he wants, learning impulse control and calmness. This needs to be done with the help of a trainer to avoid you being bitten. You may also want to get him used to wearing a soft silicone basket muzzle while you are working on the training yourself. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Dog Training Do’s https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2016/09/08/the-ten-commandments-of-dog-training-and-ownership-do-2 Again, hire a trainer to guide you through the training and get Max used to wearing a basket muzzle (he will still be able to open his mouth with a basket type) if he has shown aggression toward you. You can use his daily kibble as rewards for tolerating the muzzle. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Barrett
Mutt
4 Months
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Barrett
Mutt
4 Months

We just adopted Barrett who is believed to be about 4 months old and is a Great Pyrneese/ Australian Shepherd mix. We brought him home to our two current dogs, Lola - a Doberman/Lab mix who is 4, and Jack - a Blue Heeler who is 2. Jack is very high energy and Lola is more laid back. The issue we're having is that the puppy is acting aggressive toward them, rather than the other way around. Jack and Lola act scared of him, while he growls, barks and jumps to nip at them. We have him on a leash and ensure that they give him space, but he continues to act this way even after we try to correct him. What could we do to fix this issue as we want them all to be comfortable at home.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sydney, It sounds like your pup may have the stronger personality between the three. The growling and nipping is probably his way of trying to play but is just rude about it since he hasn't learned to be more respectful yet. This pup will probably need a lot more structure in general than your other two dogs, and that's alright. First, I suggest teaching the Out command (which means leave the area) and the Leave It command using the methods from the articles linked below. For the Out method, be sure to also read the section about how to use Out to deal with pushy behavior. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Second, work on commands that build respect, self-control, and calmness in general this year. Remember to still be patient with him, he may have a strong personality but he is still a puppy and doing what is normal for many puppies at this age - he simply needs your guidance to learn respect, trust, self-control, and calmness so that he can enjoy being with your other two dogs. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Dog Training Do’s https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2016/09/08/the-ten-commandments-of-dog-training-and-ownership-do-2 Finally, reward him calmly when you randomly catch him making good choices, like lying down quietly without having to be told, being calm around your other dogs, or looking to you for direction. Use soft praise and calmer body language with him to help him stay calm. If you are not already doing it, crate train him and use an exercise pen with food stuffed chew toys in the pen and crate, to give him a calm, safe place to play and rest when you are not able to directly supervise him with your older dogs, or when he gets overly rambunctious - many puppies will actually get more excited when tired, and need some quiet time in order to calm back down. Surprise method for introducing the crate and pen: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koda
Australian Shepherd
6 Years
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Koda
Australian Shepherd
6 Years

Our 6 year old Aussie Koda has been with us since she was a little baby. She is super sweet and loves attention, and she can be a bit of a drama queen at times or when she wants something. 3 years ago we introduced a new 9-week old Australian shepherd puppy to our house hold. Right off the bat the puppy went for Koda while she was eating and of course Koda nipped at her. The new puppy was so small that the nip did serious damage to the puppies little face. The new puppy "Chloe" ended up loosing her eye because of the nip that she was given. Years have gone by and all is well with Koda and Chloe, they love each other, and they play all the time. We have not had any further issues with either of them. I guess we are gluttons for punishment because we just got another Australian Shepherd puppy a couple of day ago. We have the puppy isolated to a separate area so that Koda can have her own space, and we do not force them to be together. Koda does not even want to look at the puppy when we are inside of the house. She will growl, snarl, and show teeth if the puppy gets too close. For the most part Koda will run away from the puppy and go upstairs to my room where she just lies on the bed all day. The strange part of all of this is that if I let Koda, Chloe and the puppy outside, Koda will sometimes initiate play with the puppy. The supply will chase Koda, and she will of course run but when the puppy stops Koda approaches the puppy inquisitively and plays with her. Everything is fine and good until we come inside of the house, and then she gets all crabby again. Koda nipped at the puppy on the way in the house the other day, and we are so stressed after what happened to Chloe that we are not sure what to do. As a side note, Chloe is great with the puppy, she corrects her and is very tolerant of her.

What can we do to get Koda to settle down about the puppy and to not be so mean to her. We are so afraid that Koda is going to correct the puppy with a nip and it is going to hurt her. Koda has very short teeth, and she is quick to nip. Koda does not provide much warning before she just nips. The nip happens so quickly and then it is over. Koda does not keep going after the puppy, she just moves to get away from it. Do you have any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shelly, First, continue using the crate and an exercise for pup to be in when you cannot supervise her and the older dogs together. Second, feed all the dogs in separate crates with the doors locked so that there are not empty or full food bowls around to guard. Keep the doors of the crates closed when no one is in the crate to prevent the other dogs from snooping around each others crates for food - which could make Koda feel upset. When you are supervising, teach all the dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for all the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls or nips at your pup, make koda leave the room while also disciplining pup if she did something she shouldn't have. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression. At the same time Koda needs to learn that it is not her job to manage pup and that she has to let you handle any issues and not deal with it herself - she is not in charge of pup. You are in charge of all the dogs. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. If Koda isn't listening to you well, have her work for what she gets in life by having to do a command first. For example, have her sit before being let outside, lie down before being petting, wait before being fed, Watch Me before you throw a toy, ect...sometimes dogs feel insecure because there is a lack of respect for the human in the house and that needs to be calmly dealt with. That doesn't necessarily sound like the case here but keep an eye out for it. Also, spend some time learning about canine body language. Watch for subtle signs that Koda is getting stressed. She likely is giving off warning signals but they are vague and pup hasn't learned to recognize them yet. Look for freezing, stiffening, raised hair on back, a quiet lifted lip, a hard stare, a tail that is raised where the tail meets her back, and ears back - which is more a sign of discomfort and anxiety, which can proceed aggression. Don't baby, reward, or pet Koda when she is behaving aggressively or tense. Instead be confident, firm, and calm. When she is tolerant, relaxed, and friendly you can pet, praise and reward to encourage that behavior instead of tenseness and aggression. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maverick
Labrador Husky
4 Years
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Maverick
Labrador Husky
4 Years

We recently just picked up a new corgi puppy to join our family. Maverick, our husky/lab, seems to tolerate him outside but inside he doesn’t seem to want him near him. He is ok with him laying near him but if he’s up walking around he low growls at him. Today Monty, the corgi, got to him I guess and Maverick mouthed him. Didn’t draw blood, just a “hey stop it” grab. He is Very gentle with his mouth. This caused Monty to yelp like crazy as if he had been seriously hurt. We make sure to give lots of love to Maverick when one of us is playing with Monty and Maverick can get up on the couch to escape him. How long does a dog typically take to warm up to a puppy? Also do you have any tips on what to do to get Maverick to warm up to him?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Beckkie, If you feel overwhelmed, things are getting worse, or there is a bite, then I would seek professional help. Aggression is something best addressed immediately or it can get worse, so if you feel good about working through it yourself you can try the below suggestions, but if you are not seeing improvement or feel overwhelmed by it, then you may want to hire someone who is very experienced with aggression to come to your home and help one-on-one with you (obedience classes aren't enough - you need someone who has a lot of experience with behavior issues to address it with the dogs and teach you how to manage it in real time). Work on taking the pressure off of both dogs by mediating situations for them, work on commands that improve calmness and self-control, and make and enforce the rules so that the dogs are not working it out themselves - you are telling them how to react and behavior in a calm but firm way. I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness or mild resource guarding. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes! Even if you don't crate train your older dog, do crate train pup so that they can be in the crate or exercise pen when you aren't able to supervise the dog's together, and to keep pup safe in general from chewing and getting into things. Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog pushes pup or gets between you and pup uninvited, tell your older dog Out and enforce him leaving. When he is waiting for his turn patiently, then send pup to place and invite Dexter over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention if pushiness is an issue, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If your older dog growls at pup, make him leave the room while also carefully disciplining pup if pup antagonized him. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. When pup first enters the room, give your older dog a treat without pup seeing so pup is associated with good things for your older dog - treats stop when pup leaves. When your older dog is being calm, tolerant, and friendly without acting dominant and pushy toward pup, you can also calmly give a treat. Keep the energy calm when interacting with the dogs. Don't feel sorry for either dog but give clear boundaries instead. Don't expect them to be best friends right now - the goal is calm co-existence. When puppy matures and they have learned good manners around each other, they may decide to be friends as adults, but calmness, tolerance, and co-existence comes first. You want your older dog to learn to be tolerant and look to you for direction within a month, but how soon they will play and truly enjoy each other depends a lot on the specific dog. Some dogs do great once they have some good boundaries and have established a bit of trust and respect with your help, others may not be buddies until the puppy is an adult and calmer. My own older dog was tolerant of our younger dog as a puppy and looked to me when there was an issue due to training, but they did not actively play together until my younger dog was about a year old. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Fudge and tara
Cocker Spaniel
4 Years
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Question
1 found helpful
Fudge and tara
Cocker Spaniel
4 Years

Tara ( 4,black and white) loves humans but is less keen around other dogs so we thought if we got a puppy then she might overcome it. Fudge(14 weeks, black and tan) just jumps on Tara and bites her. I know this is pretty normal for puppy behaviour but the trouble is Tara hasn’t got a bad bone is her body and won’t tell Fudge of like she needs to. We are kind of at a loss of what to do so any help would be much appreciated. Thanks

Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-puppy-to-respect-an-older-dog

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Niahm, first Crate Train the puppy. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (which will mostly be puppy right now it sounds like). Follow the steps in the article below for teaching Out, then also follow the steps for How to Use Out to Deal with Pushiness section of the article, and step between pup and your older dog and be the one to walk toward the puppy until he backs out of the area. When Fudge gets really wound up he likely also needs some quiet time to chew on a food stuffed chew toy in an exercise pen or crate - many puppies get wound up when overtired or if they haven't been exercised that day or mentally stimulated. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Finally, whenever your older dog is being tolerant, friendly, or calm around the puppy sneak her a treat (try not to let pup see the treat so he doesn't run over to your dog). Also, whenever puppy first enters the room give your Tara a treat before she reacts fearfully or aggressively (if it ever gets to that point). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Mastiff
16 Weeks
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Lucy
Mastiff
16 Weeks

My pup runs away from my husband when approached ( and is very skittish around strangers)yet she will go to him if he has food and has now started to bark at him my husband is getting frustrated and I’m worried that I will end up with an aggressive dog? She was born to a rescue dog so we think she is mastiff x lab

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Margaret, It sounds like she was never socialized around men while very young. Men are more intimidating in general for most dogs. How long have you had her? If you just adopted her, he needs to give it more time and try to be patient with her - it will be easier for him to be patient if he feels like he knows what to do about the issue probably. I suggest having him use her daily meal kibble as rewards for being calm around him. Check out the video linked below for an example of this. Whenever he is able, have him feed her her entire meal this way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E I also suggest doing confidence building exercises with her in general: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elvtxiDW6g0 Finally, when your husband can get closer as she gets more comfortable around him, then have him teach her things like heel, basic obedience commands, and tricks to build their bond and her trust in him. Obedience is a great way to build trust and respect without intimidation. I would hire a trainer right now to help you with socialization. You can learn to do it yourself but you absolutely cannot afford to wait to get her around new people, and it will be easier if you have someone to guide you. Ask questions and make sure the person you hire has a lot of experience with behavior problems, fear, and puppies. When you get her around new people, you need to be calm, confident, and upbeat - praising her and rewarding her with treats for calmness, tolerance, and investigating new things. Have strangers toss her treats while she is calm and not barking to help her associate them with good things. When she can handle being around strangers and family, then have calm friends practice getting her used to touch by feeding her a treat while gently touching her somewhere - as soon as the treat is gone the touch stops. Practice this with her yourself first, then have family members practice it with her, before having trusted friends also help you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
wheaten terrier
7 Months
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Max
wheaten terrier
7 Months

I have a 12 year old wheaten (Buddy) and a new 7mo wheaten puppy (Max). Buddy not used to other dogs and gets nervous easily. Max wants to play but the old dog doesn't. Early on, Max would try to play with Buddy but Buddy was too nervous and tried to hump the puppy. Thankfully the puppy has gotten the message and has calmed down around the older one. And Buddy doesn't get excited anymore except when the dog is playing. But now, the puppy will attack the older dog over attention, special toys, or seemingly random occurrences. Buddy doesn't defend himself even though the puppy has drawn blood once. Max goes straight for the neck of Buddy. We put Max in his kennel whenever this happens, buts its a kind of thing where its dangerous each time it happens because Buddy may snap and really hurt Max or vice versa.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ian, I highly suggest hiring a trainer who will come to your home to help with the aggression. In the meantime Max may need to wear a basket muzzle when in the same space as buddy. Max probably needs a lot more structure and respect for your family. It sounds like he may be possessive of you - which is partially an issue of him not respecting you enough. Hire a trainer who specializes in aggression, work on building his respect for you, adding a lot of structure into his routine (making him work and do obedience), and putting rules in place for the dogs and you being the one to enforce it so dogs don't. Have him work for everything he gets for a while by having him perform a command first. For example, have him sit before you feed him, lay down before you pet him, look at you before you take him outside, ect.. If he nudges you, climbs into your lap uninvited, begs, or does anything else pushy, make him leave the room. Teach him a Place command and work on him staying on place for up to an hour, even when you walk into the other room for a minute. Practice crate manners. Work on teaching a structured Heel. Forget about getting places during a walk for a while right now, instead go somewhere open, like your front yard, a park, or culdesac and practice a heel where his nose does not go past your leg. You need to hire a trainer to help you with the aggression and you need someone who uses a lot of boundaries, positive reinforcement and fair discipline tactfully. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression and different types of aggression - many trainers are only experienced with fear based aggression and you likely have some dominance- based or territorial aggression going on too, and they are treated a bit differently than fear. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Introduce a basket muzzle while working through all this to keep buddy safe. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your pup growls at your dog, make him leave the room while also disciplining the other dog for antagonizing if needed (not an issue now it sounds like). Be vigilant. You want both dogs to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him. I would have pup wear a basket muzzle while practicing this to avoid injury to Buddy, give you the ability to enforce the training the way it needs to be - so he can't use his mouth to get what he wants, and to prevent pup from possibly redirecting his aggression toward you or protesting the new rules by biting you. Crate train pup, and give pup a food stuffed hollow chew toy like a Kong in the crate, and have pup spend time in the crate when you cannot supervise, and on Place for longer periods of time to learn better impulse control and calmness. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Annie
German Shepherd
12 Weeks
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Annie
German Shepherd
12 Weeks

Hi there. We have a 14 year old golden retriever that does not stand up for herself. She is a submissive personality. We have lived with multiple dogs before but the new puppy I think is starting to wear here down. The puppy wants to play and does the nipping around her face legs and pulls on her tail. Molly the older dog won't correct her she just tries to get away. This makes it more of a game to the puppy annie. I have a feeling she's not being exercised enough. When we got her we found out she has worms and an intestinal infection so I'm not able to take her for walks around the block or take her places to socialize until she us better.I do play with her in the house but how do we help my old girl til then. It could be another month before we can venture out.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Heather, Crate train puppy and purchase and exercise pen and keep pup away from your Golden when you cannot supervise them together. Fill hollow chew toys with dog food and a little peanut butter, soft cheese, of liver paste (avoid Xylitol sweetener in some Peanut butter - it's toxic!). You can make the food last longer by placing pups food in a bowl, cover food with water, let it sit out until food turns to mush, mix a little peanut butter, soft cheese, or liver paste into it, then loosely stuff toy and freeze overnight. You can make several ahead of time and grab from freezer as needed - pup can eat all of her meals this way to keep her busier. Follow the Surprise method and the Crate manners protocol to help teach calmness in the crate. Crying for a few days is normal though - stay strong and don't let her out while she is crying unless she truly needs to go potty. She needs the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self- entertain with the chew toy in the crate or pen. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate manners to help teach calmness and self-control: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Next, teach pup the Out and Leave It commands and also follow the section in the Out article on how to use out to deal with pushiness once you have already taught the meaning of the command. Use that advice when pup is pestering your Golden and not obeying Out. Out (which means leave the area): https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave it method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite To help with pup's energy have multiple short obedience sessions where you are teaching something new, something that requires a lot of self-control for her, or something that requires a lot of thinking in general. Mental exercise can actually wear puppies out even more than physical exercise - especially for more intelligent, driven breeds like Shepherds. Give the food stuffed hollow chew toys for her to work for meals also - this gives her a "job" to do and teaches her to chew the right things and settle down. Some good commands that require a lot of self-control are: Down Stay Heel-You can teach this in your own backyard or even in the house sometimes: Turns method for heeling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Thresholds - you can practice with outside doors especially, as a good safety no-door-bolting protocol, BUT attach a long leash to her and the other end of it to something secure inside your home just in case she gets past you through the door during practice. Add distractions like neighbors or kids outside as she improves to make it harder and increase her skill level: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Any basic obedience: Sit, Come, Stay, Down, Stand - taught, then practiced all together in quick repetition, for longer periods of time, with distractions, or from a distance as she improves more. New tricks like bringing things to you Finally, be an advocate for your older dog. Make and enforce household rules for all the dogs so they don't have to enforce the rules themselves. Things like no stealing food, bothering while sleeping, shoving out of the way, acting aggressive toward, continuing when one wants to stop, resource guarding people or things, keeping another from getting into or through a space, ect...When one dog (mostly pup probably) breaks a rule, you enforce the rules by making the rule breaker leave, using the Out command, returning a stolen toy to who had it first, making pup leave the room while your other dog eats or sleeps, ect.. If food stealing is an issue, feed both dogs in separate locked crates to remove the tension around food and to help them focus on eating and not guarding food or feeling too worried to eat. It is OKAY for pup to learn to stay on Place for an hour with a chew toy and simply leave your older dog alone - in fact that is a useful skill later in life. This will take some time to teach though so be patient - BUT just practicing it should help wear pup out if it's a bit challenging. As long as you are giving pup the mental stimulation she needs at other times, puppy can spend time learning how to chew quietly on a chew toy and develop an "off" switch through practices like Place. Most puppies have to be an off switch taught while young - they don't naturally know how. As soon as she is well, I suggest finding a puppy play group or kindergarten class that has time for off leash puppy play that is moderated to prevent bullying and pups feeling overwhelmed (with breaks as needed essentially) to help her learn bite inhibition and social skills with other dogs - puppy play is by far the best and safest way to do this around other dogs. Don't wait to join a class, go as soon as pup is able because bite inhibition is age dependent. Once she is well, focus most of your energy also on taking her places and making interactions with other people fun but calm as well. You will have lost some time with socialization and need to do a lot of catch up fast, so that will be your main focus for a while when you get to that point with her health. As a more reserved breed socialization with others will be super important even though she is probably still at the age where she does fine - work on it when you are able to again so she stays fine and doesn't develop issues later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pippa
cross
8 Weeks
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Pippa
cross
8 Weeks

My Maltese is 14 years old and weigh 3kg. The puppy is a cross breed, much stronger than the Maltese. She wants to play but in the process she hurts the little Maltese. He doesn't fend for h imself but keeps on running away which make it worse. I don't want to get rid of anyone but how do I train the puppy to stop hurting the Maltese

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Soekie, I suggest crate training, tethering, teaching Out, and teaching Place commands. Out means leave the area is a great command to use to teach a pup to stay out of another dog's space. Place is great for teaching calmness while they are together and you can give a food stuffed Kong while on the place also to keep pup entertained. Crate Training and tethering pup to yourself with a 6 foot leash are super important during times when you cannot actively supervise the dogs together and be teaching pup. Out command-read entire article for how to teach and also how to use in different situations: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place - expect place to take pup time to learn. Start teaching pup now and gradually increase how long he can stay there with lots of practice - great command for adult dogs later too: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Crate Training - Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate manners - if needed: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Google various ways to stuff Kongs to make them interesting. You can even make frozen ones ahead of time using pup's food, some water, and a little liver paste, cheese, or peanut butter (NO xylitol - it's toxic). If you freeze just put a straw through the kong while it is freezing, then remove straw before giving to pup - to prevent a suction action. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Caylee
Labrador Retriever
4 Years
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Caylee
Labrador Retriever
4 Years

Hello I have an 11 year old Golden Retriever and we rescued a Labrador Retriever who was not trained to play or interact with other dogs so she plays aggressively. This can be shown by Caylee wanting to play with my 11 year old Golden Retriever who does not want to play with her like nudging, bolting at her and poking my older dog's body. My question is what can I do to get Caylee to respect and not be aggressive towards my older Golden Retriever.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, I suggest crate training the younger dog, teaching Place, Leave It, and Out - which means leave the area. Also, be sure to give the younger dog physical and mental exercise - especially mental. Mental exercise can look like daily walks where its a very structured, focused heel, with Sit and Down stays practiced intermittently - so that pup is having to think a lot mentally. Incorporating obedience commands into a fetch. Practicing training daily. Out command (always be careful when enforcing Out or any directional command. Get professional help if pup shows any signs of aggression. Interrupt unwanted behavior early, before pup is so aroused it's harder for them to respond): https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for all the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. Things like: no aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no keeping another dog away from an area or person, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are not working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog, or keep a drag leash on him so that you can easily lead him while you are home to supervise (keep him crated when not supervising right now). If there are any signs of aggression, don't do this on your own, hire a trainer to work with you on that also. You don't want to risk a bite. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of the dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and the dogs to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have had to use aggression, roughness, bullying, or hiding all the time. The dogs don't have to play together for the younger dog to be happy. Work on calm co-existence between them, and only allow play if the older dog initiates it and pup is being respectful. Use commands like Place, Out, and Leave It to enforce calmness at home. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kilo
Shepard pit mix
1 Year
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Kilo
Shepard pit mix
1 Year

Hi my name is Olivia I have a 1 year old Shepard pit mix and we live at my mom and dads with my sister and her boyfriend they have a dog a sharpe English bulldog mix he’s 4 and my kilo keeps getting in his face all the time and my sisters dog don’t like it at all he growls at him they have gotten in 2 fights over it. My parents hate it and want the dogs gone or trained what can I do to stop this.. the dogs are both going in to get fixed Ik that’s a big reason for dominate issues but what if he still does it when they both are fixed. I need help please 😩

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, First, always be careful when dealing with aggression. Many dogs will redirect their aggression to whoever is closest while in a tense state or fighting. I would recommend desensitizing both dogs to wearing a basket muzzle while you are home to supervise, and having them wear those to keep not only the dogs safe, both the people training and living with them. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s With both dogs wearing muzzles for your safety, work on the following training - I do suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression to work with you on all of this, and again, always be careful when dealing with any aggression - there is always the risk of you being bitten. Crate train both dogs using the crate manners and Surprise methods from the article and video linked below. Feed both dogs in separate locked crates at meal times. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Second, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed - including if pup is hovering around water bowl to guard. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to leave, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If you’re your older dog growls at pup, make him leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. Teach both dogs the Place command and work up to having them both stay on their separate Place beds calmly for 1-2 hours. This is a great calming, self-control building, and tolerance exercise. It also helps get them both in a working, more respectful mindset while in the same room as each other. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Finally, work on manners and building respect and trust for you with both dogs. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Just to emphasize again, have pup's wear muzzles while doing any of the above, and in general. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rosie
Irish Setter
9 Weeks
3 found helpful
Question
3 found helpful
Rosie
Irish Setter
9 Weeks

Hi
We have a new puppy, we have only had her just over a week but we have got two other dogs copper who is 7 and gruff who is 2. I am unsure when I should get involved as Rosie is unable to go out for walks right now so is unable to properly rid herself of energy and the three are unable to properly bond as a pack.
I have been getting involved when ever the two growl at her, and trying to teach her to leave and no, she does listen sometimes but obviously sometime she just really wants to play with them and they are not really ready to.
Should I allow them to correct her when she over steps with them, how do i know they will not go to far and hurt her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shona, I generally recommend not allowing older dogs to correct puppies when things are tense. If you step in and manage pup instead, that takes pressure off the older dogs - which can help them like and adjust to her more easily, and your corrections still help her learn what's acceptable and not. Start by rewarding older dogs when she enters the room, they are tolerant of her, and friendly - try to remove without puppy seeing so she doesn't rush over to get a treat too. Correct older dogs for things you find unacceptable, manage puppy so she doesn't pester them too much by being rude, stealing toys, waking them up, ect... Some older dogs do a good job of teaching puppies how to behave but a lot don't so I generally recommend you make the rules and enforce them for all the dogs, instead of letting them work it out on their own. With everyone looking to you for direction, things should go more smoothly. The rules that dog's may make are not always rules you will be okay with. A crate, exercise pen, and attaching pup to yourself with a 6 foot leash are good tools for managing puppy when you are not actively mediating things between the dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kahlua & Whiskey
Australian Shepherd
7 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Kahlua & Whiskey
Australian Shepherd
7 Months

Kahlua (Brown 7 months) is trying to establish dominance in the house, almost to the point she’s kinda bullying our new pup Whiskey (2months). Whiskey usually minds his own business naturally, he doesn’t really interrupt her space. But even if he walks pass her, or trails behind me. She bumps into him, and nips at him (or constantly wants to play rough).

What should I do, since it’s my older puppy that’s bullying my younger pup?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Za'Ria, Kahlua is hitting the age that's an equivalent of a puppy teenager right now - this is a common age for puppies to push boundaries, wander off, listen less, experiment with dominance, and play rough. As a herding breed she is also probably experiencing more of those instincts emerging (the shoving and nipping are herding behaviors in Aussie's - which you likely know). It's her way of trying to control the younger pup. I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you - especially for the older pup. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness too. It's also good for increasing impulse control - which is an important skill for your older pup to practice right now. Out command - read the entire article, including the section for using Out to deal with pushy behavior: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes. You may already be doing this but if not I suggest adding it. The crate manners protocol is good even for already crate trained dogs - to work on impulse control, respect and calmness skills. Crate Manners - great calmness and gentle respect building exercise : https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Reel In method for teaching Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves - meaning your older pup isn't controlling as much. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog pushes pup or gets between you and pup uninvited, tell your older dog Out and enforce her leaving. When she is waiting for her turn patiently, then send Whiskey to place and invite Kahlua over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog - especially Kahlua. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention if pushiness is an issue, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If your older dog growls at pup, make Kahlua leave the room while also carefully disciplining Whiskey if pup antagonized her first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. Moderate the play. Use commands like Out, Place, and Leave It to enforce when it's time to play and when it's not. Your younger pup doesn't need to stick up for himself - you be the one to make and enforce your house rules and teach dogs to abide by them. Keep a drag leash on both dogs, or at least Kahlua while in the house while you can supervise. Calmly go over to pup, step on the leash and pick up the end of it and direct Kahlua where she needs to go if you gave a command like Place or Out and she is ignoring you. Having the ability to back up what you say is huge here - she needs to learn that when you give a command you will back it up - so that your commands have meaning to her and she will learn to respond to them better as time goes on. Consistency and Working methods -as needed: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jessie, Chewy and Cleo
German Shepherd
11 Years
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Jessie, Chewy and Cleo
German Shepherd
11 Years

Jessie is 11 (German shepherd cross Labrador) and the pups are almost 3 (American staffys) and they've had many issues in the 2 and a half years they've been together. The most concerning thing to me at the moment is that Cleo is trying to take dominance fore Jessie which means she is always trying to tell Jessie what she can and can't do. The dogs are always outside because we have rabbits inside. The dogs sleep in the shed which has all their blankets and things. There is an actual kennel in the yard but none of them have ever used it. That has changed in the last few weeks. Cleo won't let Jessie in the shed so Jess will walk to the kennel but then Cleo forces her out of there as well. I only noticed this because it was raining really badly a few weeks ago and when I checked on the dogs the pups were dry from being in the shed but Jessie was drenched because Cleo wouldn't let her take shelter anywhere. I've not seen Jessie in the shed or kennel for longer than a few minutes since. Should we just section of the side of the yard with the kennel or is there something else we can do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Johanna, If the dogs were inside dogs or you were outside with them more, then the solution would be a high level of training and managing on your end to establish rules and you enforce them between the dogs - the dogs way of treating each other would be based on respect for you and not just for each other, so that no dog is deciding what another dog can and can't do - that's your job. With the dogs being outside dogs and not with you most of the time you are looking at simply managing opposed to truly training. I suggest separating the dogs. Dividing the yard with a shelter in each section of the yard for all the dogs and preventing Cleo from being able to get to Jesse and bully her - not just around the shelter but in general. Best of luck, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nova
Rottweiler
23 Months
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Nova
Rottweiler
23 Months

Hi. I have a submissive rescued Rottie who came to live with me last year at 9 months old. I have worked through most of her issues.

She has been attending Camp Bow Bow 1 x per week for over 1 year and in September she started getting upset when dogs were zooming about the yard triggering her to bite another dog. She wasn't immediately banned as they recognize this is NOT Nova's personality and want to work with her.

They tell me that Nova gets upset when dogs start zooming around the yard and it seems to be a trigger for Nova to react aggressively.

The only change in Nova's routine and life was that I recently rescued a 9 week old rottie named Lily. Lily has been bullying Nova since she arrived at my home middle of July. Following the advice of my vet; I have not interfered, allowing Nova to discipline Lily. (with one exception I did put bitter apple on Nova's ears for the first two weeks or Nova would not have any ears left. the bitter apple did help some.)

Unfortunately for all; Nova has no interest in disciplining Lily. her response when Lily is biting her or dominating her is to try to ignore Lily, go belly up, hide from Lily, run away, shake her off her heel, sit down when Lily is biting her heel, look at me for help, or hide behind me. Lily bites HARD. In July, Lily weighed 11 lbs.. now she weighs 44lbs.

Now that the puppy is living with us Nova has started being mouthy again and jumping on people when excited.... Because Lily was trying to drag Nova around by her collar.. when Nova loses it.. goes to a red zone... she drags Lily around the yard by her collar & vocally growling... Nova doesn't vocalize much.... Lily's response to this is how fun.. and to ramp it up and charge Nova with full teeth wrinkled nose and a snarl.. Nova usually turns tail and runs to find me at this point

I believe that Lily's bullying of Nova has caused her to act out in daycare. I can't have Nova biting other dogs when she is upset. and I don't know how to help her learn to discipline Lily so she is not living in fear all the time and not acting out at daycare

any ideas would be very helpful
Deborah

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Deborah, Unfortunately, I highly disagree with your vet's advice in this case. First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once she is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog acts aggressive toward your pup (which is not as likely if you are defending your older dog from her), make her leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing her if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give Nova a treat while Lily is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that Lily doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now Nova probably feels overwhelmed by Lily and because of the age and personality difference. She needs to feel like you are the one managing Lily, protecting Nova from her pestering her, and making her appearance pleasant for Nova. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then Nova may adjust to her presence as she grows, especially when she calms down when older and through boundaries you have taught Lily. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. My own older dog was very tolerant of our youngest dog for the first year and did well, but they were not buddies until she became an adult and calmed down. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Stanley
Border collie mix
13 Weeks
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Question
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Stanley
Border collie mix
13 Weeks

Stanley is doing very well, however he constantly is jumping on and intitiating play with my six yr old female pit STella. Stella plays but it starts to annoy her also when she does not want to play. I can separate them when Stanley is too much but I would him to listen to me when I say no more. He knows sit and is very food motivated any suggestions would be great

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Terri, At this stage definitely always supervise the dogs when they are together. Confine pup to the crate or an exercise pen when you can't supervise. With two dogs, its always a good idea to give both a lot of structures, decide some boundaries for both dogs, and you be the one to enforce the rules. Some examples of rules you can put into place for the dogs can include, but are not limited to: No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make Stella leave the room while also disciplining puppy if pup broke one of your rules, like antagonizing Stella, also. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or avoid him. Some good commands to work on with both dogs to help with boundaries and calmness include: Out command - this is the command I would work the most on with puppy right now: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Place, Out, and Leave It are especially great commands for multi-dog households! Out is probably the number one command I use managing multiple dogs and the command I would suggest using to help pup learn to give your other dog space. Read the entire article "Out" article I linked above and pay special attention to the sections on How to teach Out and How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior. You will find yourself having to enforce out a LOT at first - stay consistent and pup should gradually start learning to listen without you having to walk over there to physically show him each time. Reward your older dog with a treat (when puppy isn't watching) whenever she is tolerant and calm around the new puppy. Also, reward your older dog when puppy simply enters the room at first - to associate pup's appearance with good things for your older dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Toni
Pekingese
13 Years
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Toni
Pekingese
13 Years

Just got a young puppy pekingese she is 12 weeks old and she harasses our older dog, biting his cheeks and ears, barking in his face, trying to eat his food, he tries to growl and is very patient with her but she will not stop no matter what he does back to her, he refuses to lie in any dog bed that she touches or play with any toys she touches, he looks so upset that we have her and he is normally very playful and full of energy but now seems to be sulking constantly

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Adam, First, don't let the dogs work it out for themselves. Second, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once she is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues (probably always puppy) leave the area as needed. Follow the How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior section of the article to enforce the Out command once you have taught the command to pup. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make him leave the room or tell him Ah Ah if needed while also disciplining pup for antagonizing him if needed (essentially teach both that you will handle the issue for them). Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let pup see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. Right now Toni probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of his age it’s harder for him to handle her and keep up with her energy. He needs to feel like you are the one managing her, protecting him from her pestering him, and making her appearance pleasant for him. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then he may adjust to her presence as she grows, especially when she calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. My own older dog, although very tolerant of our youngest dog, was not buddies with her until she became an adult and calmed down. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chip
Shih Tzu
14 Years
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Question
1 found helpful
Chip
Shih Tzu
14 Years

We have a 14-year-old dog named chip, and we just got a 3-month border collie mix with heeler named Remus. He is so excited and doesn't understand that Chip is old and a little unstable on his feet. When we come home from work Chip will be out side( we have a doggy door) and Remus will be inside with Chips bed moved acrossed the floor. Its hard because we are not there to see if he is being mean to Chip or Chip just gets annoyed and leaves. And its also hard because chip can't really defend him self, he snips at Remus but it seems to not really do anything. Then this morning my husband came down to Remus gnawing on chips foot. Chip was barking at him but Remus didn't move until he saw my husband. We have only had him for 4 days. And Remus is a very good dog and very smart! But we are worried that it won't get better.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. If you don't follow any of the other advice I give, this is the most important part to receive. Crate training pup and crating pup when you can't supervise the dogs together could end up meaning the difference between the dogs doing well together and having to re-home puppy. Crating also helps prevent separation anxiety in the long run by teaching independence. It can help prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits from becoming long-term, can help pup adapt to boarding, needing to be confined during injuries later, and traveling later in life. A crate trained dog is often able to have more freedom later in life because bad and dangerous habits were prevented during early potty training, destructive phases. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once pup is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup gently for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever your older dog is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give your older dog a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm your older dog. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of his age it’s harder for him to handle him and keep up with his energy. Your older dog needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from him pestering him, and making his appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then your older may adjust to puppy's presence as he grows, especially when he calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends and force them together. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later! But they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. I find that about half of all older dogs find new puppies stressful at first. Many do adjust as puppy matures though and may even become buddies later - you have to add structure and boundaries to help their relationship be calmer and not force interactions though. My own older dog was very tolerant of and did well with our younger dog as a puppy for the first year, but they mostly just co-existed calmly and he avoided her touching him. It wasn't until she became an adult and calmed down that they really became friends and liked playing together. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocket
Goldador
2 Years
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Rocket
Goldador
2 Years

My oldest pup, Rocket, is about 3 months short of being 2 years old and as hyper as ever seeing as he is a Goldador/Shepherd mix. We got him a little sister, a 9 week old Kelpie/Shepherd mix named Nova, in the hopes that having a playmate that can keep up energy wise would help tire him out. Instead, Rocket has begun growling and snatching toys from Nova any time she goes near them. They play wonderfully when there's nothing around, but Rocket gets extremely defensive of any toy Nova tries playing with. How can I curve this behavior seeing as he only recently went from being an 'only child' and has never had to share before?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, I would hire a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues to help you with this case in person. You really could use someone who can see the dogs together, tailor a training plan, and demonstrate things. This first comes down to your leadership among the dogs. Both dogs need to trust and respect you enough that they will let you handle situations between them. Both need some boundaries. I would teach dog dogs Out, Leave It, and Place, but especially your adult dog. I would be careful how you manage the toys - perhaps only leaving a small handful out at a time to keep track of so that there is less to guard. Finally, I would correct resource guarding by making your older dog leave the room each time, and reward older pup with a treat or better toy whenever they are calm and tolerant around puppy - especially around objects, so that ultimately pup learns what is acceptable and not acceptable, and begins to associate pup being near their toys with something pleasant like treats. I would do all of the above with the help of a qualified trainer who has experience in this area, to ensure everyone stays safe during the transition. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Timber
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks
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Question
1 found helpful
Timber
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks

2 days ago, we got a 9 week old male Husky, Timber. Our other dog, Mia, is an 8 month old female bulldog/blue heeler mix. Mia and Timber get along great but when playing, Timber bites Mia everywhere really but especially on her face and neck. Timber's sharp puppy teeth are causing sores on Mia, but she still continues to play with him. How can we stop Timber from doing this? Redirecting doesn't seem to work.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amy, First, I suggest enrolling pup in a puppy kindergarten class that has time for moderated off leash play. Puppies play differently than adults and typically pups learn to control the pressure of their bites best by playing with other puppies, who will tell and stop playing if a pup gets too rough, teaching each other to be gentle. The play should always be moderated by a knowledgeable trainer who can tell when pups need a break too. Second, check out the article linked below and the Leave It method. Work pup learning to respond to leave it when excited. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Third, teach pup the Out command and gently enforce it by walking pup out of the room when they get especially rough and wound up. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, crate train pup and crate pup with a dog food stuffed chew toy when they are having a really hard calming down. Young puppies can get really wound up when tired and need frequent breaks to rest and settle back down - it's a bit like an overtired toddler having more tantrums. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Norah
Borador
1 Year
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Norah
Borador
1 Year

Hello, Norah is just over 1 year old. She gets lots of exercise, when outside on walks she plays really well with dogs and is respectful. However, when I take her to my family's house she is always in the face of their 9 year old collie cross, always licking inside his mouth constantly and just fixated on him. She does this with my other relative's adult dog as well. I have tried to remove her from the room and use 'out' when she starts to lick inside their mouth and get in their face but I don't know if its working, maybe I haven't repeated it enough im not sure. It's really annoying and i wish she would be peaceful and not as obsessed. Even if she has been on the go all day exercising she will still be fixed on the other dog and always in their face. Some help would be great thank
you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christina, When out the article linked below on teaching Out - and specifically the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior. You may already be doing that part, but it not work on that also. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Work on teaching pup a Place command and work on to pup being able to stay on Place during times of high excitement - like when people first get home or guests are over; Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Work on teaching Down-Stay and leave it also: Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Once pup knows those commands, use those commands to tell her what to do and where to be. Enforce those commands consistently yourself. If pup is disobeying a command, use a leash or your body language (the way Out describes) to redirect her to what she should be doing instead, with a calm and confident attitude yourself. Reward her for chewing on her own chew toys on Place, lying down quietly, and generally giving space to the other dogs. If pup is still obsessing over the dogs, you may need an interrupter if the behavior is obsessive. For this, instruct her what to do - like Out or Place or Leave It, then if she disobeys - having clearly understood your command, spray a small puff of air from a pet convincer at her side while calmly telling her "Ah Ah", then repeat your command and reward when she obeys it that time. Do not use citronella and do not spray in the face. Watch for any signs of aggression and do not correct without the help of a trainer and additional safety measures if she may react aggressively. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ace
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
5 Months
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Ace
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
5 Months

Hiya, when my puppy plays he just likes to be ontop and biting. I know this might be normal behaviour but sometimes he just lunges and bites and pulls on ears and cheeks and noses. Sometimes I have to get him off, there’s no growling or showing teeth, but then there’s no play bouncing either. The other dogs doesn’t seem bothered but it looks too rough. How do I calm him down and teach him to play nicely. Thank you 😊

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Teegan, First, if you can find a class or friends with similar age puppies (or just a bit younger like 3-6 months) I highly suggest creating time for off-leash play with other puppies. Puppies will play differently with each other and give the needed feedback during play to help each other learn to control their bites and give breaks. Puppies play differently than adult dogs usually. During play, moderate the play. When pup isn't listening to adult cues to give breaks, isn't taking turns chasing or being on top vs. running and being on bottom, then interrupt play, have pup practice a couple commands for treats until they are calmer, then see if the adult is still interesting in playing. If so, release the pup and let play resume with your "Go Play!" type cue. Be the one to help pup learn when to calm back down. When pup is playing with other puppies, the puppies should give feedback they are too rough by crying and stopping playing when a bite is too hard, but also moderate the play to help pups calm back down when one pup is getting overwhelmed due to a stronger personality or energy of another. Check out the article linked below on puppy play: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Teach puppy the Out and Leave It commands also and work on general self-control with pup, so that pup can learn when to calm themselves down as needed too. You can also use those commands to help pup know when it's time to play and when they should leave the adults alone. Out - which means leave the area https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kalai
Alusky
7 Months
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Question
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Kalai
Alusky
7 Months

I have an 8 month old Alusky puppy and a 14 year old Shepard. They get along fabulously and until recently have played very nicely together. I am concerned that he may be getting too rough for her.

The puppy has always been very respectful: he would bounce around her, softly nip at her rump or tail or run around her. She would play bark and on occasion snap and he would back off. He would either stop altogether or just switch to running around her, but he would not touch her.

The older dogs hips have started to go sometimes she will try to spin to chase him and she will lose her balance, trip or she drop to almost a sit before going after him. I have noticed that when he is being playful she positions herself along a wall or furniture so as not to lose her balance, however he has begun to bump into her shoulder to shoulder, and is now play grabbing her over the shoulders as opposed to just her rump or tail or underneck...Are these signs of dominance?

She is not showing any signs of distress that I can tell, she is not turning away, not sitting, no rolling shoulders or slumping, but she does seem to keep her head low (but I have seen him side bump her face to face and lowering her head protects her nose).... When I separate them, put a large gate around her bed while she rests to give her a break, she asks rests for a bit then asks to come out and play. When I correct him or make him stop bumping her she follows him out.

As she is getting frailer and he is getting larger (and totally clueless that he is as large as he is...he is still trying to squeeze under the bed that he no longer fits under) I am concerned about her safety and want to make sure he remains 9or resumes being) respectful.

Should I be concerned about the shoulder bumping and shoulder/neck loose "bite"? Should I keep them separate when I am not home to supervise? (They have been together unsupervised with inside outside privileges since he has been house trained at 4 months, there have been no incidents or damage).

Thank you for your advice!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question and cute photo. I would be careful with the older dog and the puppy roughhousing; there is a chance of injury. Kalai is gaining confidence and strength and may not intentionally hurt the older dog but it is a recipe for injury. I do agree that the pup may be trying to exert himself in a dominant way and if your shepherd were younger, that would not be a problem. But due to the possibility of injury, I think they should play supervised. Remember that any young dog, and especially one with Husky lineage, requires a lot of exercise in the form of hour-long walks daily (if this cannot happen every day, play lengthy games of fetch in the backyard after work). Tiring the pup out will allow the shepherd some rest when needed. Provide Kalai with sturdy interactive toys for playing and mentally stimulating toys, too when you are not at home. Good luck!

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Hershey & Dora
Dachshund
11 Years
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Hershey & Dora
Dachshund
11 Years

We just rescued a Tree Walking Coon Hound (so they say) and she is 2 years old. We have two Dachshunds that are 11 and 6 years old. The 11 year old is a male and the 6 year old is a female (she was just rescued in October and has migrated in great). Our lab/mix, Harlie just died from bone cancer and we were hoping to add another medium size dog to the house since we have two grand kids that love to run and play with dogs. The new dog is named Harper and is very sweet, but it appears from her actions towards the dachshunds that she does not have the manners or respect towards the older dogs. She just wants to play with the two smaller dogs, but the dachshunds don't really want to play with her, and she won't stop running around them and nipping at the tails and barking at them. The dachshunds have showed the new dog their dissatisfaction, but she doesn't stop. How do I get her to stop bothering (not sure if that is the right word or not) the smaller dachshunds? It's not like the dachshunds were not familiar with a medium size dog before but Harlie was not nearly as boisterous as Harper.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest working on some commands that build impulse control, and crate training pup and tethering pup to yourself with a leash while pup is in the process of learning to be calmer around the other dogs. Work on teaching pup the following commands: Out - which means leave the area (this one will be used a LOT so practice this one often and consistently). Be sure to read the whole article and pay special attention to the sections on how to teach Out and how to use Out to deal with pushy behavior. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method - while teaching this never give pup the thing she is supposed to be leaving, instead reward with a separate treat or toy (you want pup to learn to leave the other dogs alone and not just wait until bothering them): https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place - work up to a 1-2 hour place command around distractions, so that this can be a staple command in your home for pup to be able to hang out with the family calmly while chewing on a bone but not bother the other dogs when things are overly exciting and everyone needs a break. It's also a great command in general and for when guests visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Reward all the dogs calmly when you catch them being tolerant and calm around each other. Try to keep the rewards calm and to not let the other dogs see you rewarding one dog so that they don't rush over. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nora
Belgian Malinois
4 Months
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Nora
Belgian Malinois
4 Months

Now I have two dogs - one about 10 years and 4 month puppy. Older dog isn't playful, on the countrary I'd call her agressive. Puppy wants attention and games so she barks and growls at my older dog. We're trying to keep them separate by chaining older dog but they both will have to live in peace outside. How can I train my puppy to respect older dog and older dog to do not pay attention to puppy?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paulina, Teach both dogs a Down-Stay, Out, and Leave It command. Keep the dogs separate when you aren't supervising. When you are supervising, spend time walking the dogs together and practicing obedience commands outside with them, encourage hanging out in a calm way, and utilize Out, Leave It, and Down-Stay while they are around each other to give each other space. Down-Stay; https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Reward them for ignoring each other, calmness, and obedience while they are together. Reward the older dog for staying calm and tolerant while pup is around especially, and reward pup for leaving the older dog alone and being calm especially. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Roxie
Red healer
10 Years
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Roxie
Red healer
10 Years

We just recently rescued 4 puppies from a bad situation in our neighborhood. We have found homes for all of them and have decided to keep one. They are very young and only about 9 weeks old. She is very energentic and we are worried about introducing her to our 2 pre-existing older pups. Our oldest, Roxie, has a bad hip and can get grumpy when she is in pain after a long day. Both of our dogs have sniffed the puppies through the window and through their pen but we have not introduced face to face. We really want this new puppy to work for our family because we have fallen in love with her but we want to make sure we do the right thing by our older pups. What is the best way that we can successfully introduce these dogs and create a good bond between them?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sydney, For the initial introduction, find an area where a lot of other dogs haven't been - like a fenced in yard or field (due to pup's vaccine status at this age). Practice the Walking Together or Passing Approach method from the article linked below with both dogs. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate crate puppy at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach all dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for all dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dogs because you have taught it to her and not because your older dogs have had to resort to aggression or hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dogs when you aren't ready to moderate. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dogs a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever they are calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give them a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding them though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm them. It's okay if they aren't all best friends right now, as long as they can co-exist peacefully. Facilitate, calm, respectful co-existence and they may become buddies as pup calms down and matures. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harry
Field Spaniel
8 Years
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Harry
Field Spaniel
8 Years

We just adopted a 6 week old shar-pei (Walter) and our older dog (Harry) has gotten violent with him a few times when correcting him. I totally understand that correcting is not inherently bad and I'm working hard to train Walter to respect Harry's space, but it's been 2 weeks and I'm worried. I've had to take Walter to the emergency vet once for a deep bite near his eye that became quickly infected. How do I teach Harry to be patient and Walter to be respectful without more violence?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, I wouldn't allow your older dog to correct pup at all - since they lack impulse control and can't do it in a beneficial way. Second, I highly suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression to work with you in person. Ask a lot of questions and check references and reviews. Find someone who is experienced in aggression - since many trainers don't focus on that area so don't have the experience you need. When an adult dog is drawing blood during an encounter, that is an aggression issue not just dogs being dogs. Hire a trainer, but until then I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness or tension. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes! Crate Manners - great calmness and gentle respect building exercise : https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog pushes pup or gets between you and pup uninvited, tell your older dog Out and enforce him leaving. When he is waiting for his turn patiently, then send pup to place and invite Walter over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If your older dog growls at pup, make your older dog leave the room while also carefully disciplining pup if pup antagonized him. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. When pup first enters the room, give your older dog a treat without pup seeing so pup is associated with good things for your older dog - treats stop when pup leaves. When your older dog is being calm, tolerant, and friendly without acting dominant and pushy toward pup, you can also calmly give a treat. Keep the energy calm when interacting with the dogs. Don't feel sorry for either dog but give clear boundaries instead. Don't expect them to be best friends right now - the goal is calm co-existence. When puppy matures and they have learned good manners around each other, they may decide to be friends as adults, but calmness, tolerance, and co-existence comes first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bear
Labrador Husky
10 Weeks
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Bear
Labrador Husky
10 Weeks

Hi, we recently brought home a lab mix pup. He is 10 weeks old now (have had him for 2 weeks) and doing great with house training and general commands like sit and come. He let’s us pick him up, come near his food while eating and is adjusting pretty well to his crate. All in all he is very sweet and a typical happy go lucky puppy.

However, we have an amazing 4 yr old medium sized dog who has been with us since she was a pup. She is pretty passive by nature. she can play pretty rough but at this point I can tell when she gets frustrated with dogs during play and she at most bats at them or knocks them over. The first few days of our new puppy being home she wanted nothing to do with him, and mostly ignored him as he followed her around and pawed at her.

Now, 2 weeks in, they’ve occasionally played but we try to keep it at a minimum because the playing can become heated as the puppy can be impolite and bite my older dogs tail or climbs on or jumps at her face. He is so small and uncoordinated that she easily knocks him over. Sometimes when my older dog knocks the pup over he just gets back up and starts playing... Other times he will give a gnarly growl/bark and once or twice I think I saw him bare teeth. Immediately my older dog backs off and we intervene and pull him away. Once he kind of barked and was sort of lunging out of my arms at her. Other times when they are playing he just yelps and there is no growling or he will crawl under the coffee table to get a little break. After any of these reactions he always tries to go back to playing with her. Anyway, he does a play growl often and I’m familiar with that being an aspect of dog play. The growl he occasionally makes which we are concerned about seems to be more of a warning because it sounds a bit more aggressive and makes my older dog back off.

How should we handle this? Should we keep them separate until he is bigger and can hold his own better? Should we let them play, but intervene when this happens? Our vet says the older dog “corrects” the pups behavior but I don’t think my older dog has this in her nature. I don’t really want the pup to develop hostile behaviors during play, or for hostility to develop between the two dogs.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Andrew, I suggest teaching both dogs a few commands to help manage their interactions, like Place, Out - which means leave the area, and Leave It. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would limit rough housing right now. If you do allow it, it should always be monitored and the dog's distracted and given a break when they start to get too excited and aroused, or one seems a bit overwhelmed. Don't expect your older dog to correct pup - due to their specific temperament they likely never will, and so long as you handle that well, that is fine. You need to step in and be the one teaching pup manners, so that pup will learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it him and not because your older dog has to correct or hide. As soon as it's safe to do so covid-wise, I also suggest enrolling pup in a puppy class that has time for moderated off-leash play with other puppies. Puppies primarily learn good social interactions from playing with other puppies - not adult dogs. It's also where they learn how to control the pressure of their bites. The play should be moderated as well, with humans stepping in to give pup's a break when things are getting too exciting, frustrating, or overwhelming for pups. Another option is to set up your own puppy class with a couple of friends who have puppies under 6 months of age, and meet in someone's fenced backyard. What to look for in a puppy class - no class will be ideal but below is what to look for in general. some places like Petco also offer free puppy play dates without the additional time for obedience training included. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ In general, it will probably be important for pup to have a bit more structure and leadership than what your other dog has required, to ensure a peaceful household with the dogs. Bellow are some good ways to facilitate that starting at this young age. First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Trixie
Jack Russell Terrier
19 Months
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Trixie
Jack Russell Terrier
19 Months

I got Trixie from a shelter 8 months ago and her and my 13 year old got along well, now all of a sudden Trixie has been attacking my older dog Buddy for no reason. I gave intervened and actually got bite by her while getting her off Buddy. I don’t know why she is now very aggressive toward Buddy, yesterday she went after him 3 times she actually got a cut by him this time. I have kept them separated all day today then all of a sudden she got in the same area as Buddy and went after him again, I have put her in the kennel but I am worried about them and don’t know what to do. Any suggestions

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Murial, You definitely need to hire a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues to come and evaluate the dogs in person as soon as possible. I would also speak with your vet and see if something medical could be going on as well. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Scout
German Shepherd
16 Weeks
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Scout
German Shepherd
16 Weeks

Hello! We adopted Scout from the shelter about 4 weeks ago (shepherd mix). She is super smart and learning fast. She now knows sit, stay, come, lay down and no bark (still working on not digging).

We have a senior lab mix, Duke, who has been with me since I rescued him 7 years ago. He is very well trained and well mannered because I worked pretty hard with him in the past to take him to work at a nursing home with me. I’m now a SAHM so I’m home with the dogs all day.

Things have been fine with them but she will NOT stop taking his toys and laying on his bed. At first I waited to see if he would correct her when she was taking toys (he loves to fetch and she tries to steal toys from his mouth while he’s returning them to me). He had to growl and give her a warning snap a few times but she did stop and things were fine for about 48 hours. It seemed as if she had learned the boundaries and respected them. Now she is back at it and I’m stepping in since his tactics aren’t working with her and he’s having to do too much to try to get her to stop. But she wont. She is also jumping on his back/neck and trying to force him to lay down under her. Which I put a stop to, but it is continuing. I’ve been reading your answers to other questions and have started working on leave it, out and place. But I want to make sure I’m not missing something.

Duke is 12ish and has disc problems in his neck. He also has seizures so surgery isn’t an option (he’s also still intact for these reasons and I have never had dominance issues with him or seen him hump) and we have him on a low dose of steroids for inflammation & comfort. I want to make sure I’m doing everything I can to avoid him getting hurt or hurting Scout because he’s in pain/trying to protect himself.

Also, wanted to mention that she is crate trained. But I struggle because my first instinct is to put her in the crate when she won’t leave him alone, but I’ve always heard not to use the crate for “punishment” or consequences. I would appreciate some guidance!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am glad that you are looking for guidance as this cannot go on - not only is it not fair that peaceful Duke has to endure possible pain and simple annoyance from Scout, it's a risk. You have to be in charge and make sure that this stops now. Scout will only get bigger and stronger and the risk of injury to Duke increases. I think you have to seek the guidance of a trainer in your area. Scout is old enough to learn her commands and become obedient. Once she has some training, you can have better control over her. Scout is a breed that needs lots of mental stimulation. How about getting her some treat toys to provide her with mental exercise? It is good that you are home all day because you have to watch her to ensure she does not cause a problem. Train her a lot - try The Turns Method for a mental workout when on walks: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Until you start the dog training, work on these methods and good luck! https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-german-shepherd-puppy

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Lucy
Goldendoodle
11 Months
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Lucy
Goldendoodle
11 Months

I've had my 11 month goldendoodle, Lucy, since she was 8 weeks. Every few weeks, we spend a weekend at my parents house with the family's 10 year old female Labrador. The Labrador has always been very friendly and tolerant and is used to other dogs coming into her space. She is definitely showing her age, and spends much of her time lying down and sleeping.

My goldendoodle has always been interested in the lab, and would try to initiate play and get attention, or jump on her. Sometimes it would annoy the lab and she'd give a gentle correction or sometimes she'd engage in a short play session. If she didn't seem interested, I'd usually intervene to separate them. They existed well together generally.

They spent the past weekend together following their normal pattern, but on the third day, the goldendoodle suddenly started trying to bully the lab. She would jump on her and growl if the lab jumped on the couch, and started stealing toys, and trying to steal food. If she even saw the lab start sniffing what might be a crumb, she would rush over with a growl and take it from the lab. The lab has basically stopped giving any sort of corrections, and just carries on without reacting.

While they don't live together, I would still like to resolve the issue. I've never seen the goldendoodle react that way with any other dogs, and she does not have any significant resource guarding issues. I interpret it as her realizing she is stronger than the older, weaker lab (even thought the lab has about 40 pounds on her) and is trying to take advantage since she no longer receives any corrections.

The goldendoodle is definitely going through a teenage phase, but she is generally very obedient, well-tempered and gets along with other dogs. I am hoping it is just a phase and won't develop into other issues with other dogs. I've already started setting some new boundaries and working on place. I'll monitor them closely the next time the dogs are together.

Just wondering if you have any other tips.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I think that training your smart Goldendoodle is going to be key to resolving the issue. Basic commands go a long way. If you have already taken her to obedience, give her a brush up on the commands or even attend the next level. The gentle Lab should not have to accept the treatment and Lucy should not be allowed to give it out. Take a look here to reinforce the recall so Lucy will come when asked and leave the Lab to rest: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall. As well, this is helpful for listening skills: which I think will go a long way in this situation: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. Lastly, can you bring along a toy - like an interactive feeder that you can give to Lucy when she needs a diversion? And: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-play-aggressively. Good luck!

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Rory
Bishon/ Shih Tzu
4 Months
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Rory
Bishon/ Shih Tzu
4 Months

We added Rory to our home 7 weeks ago. We have another Bishon / Shih Tzu who is 6 1/2 years old. He wants nothing to do with the puppy and avoids him all the time. I don’t know what to do to make the connection between them

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I like this guide, which has great suggestions, like making sure that the older dog's routine is not changed and they are given top dog spot over the newbie. Take a look, it may ease the older dog into the situation better, making the connection eventually happen. I would take them on lots of walks together. It is a good way for them to get to know each other on neutral ground. Read the entire page for helpful tips. https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog Good luck!

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Beesley
Beagle
2 Months
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Beesley
Beagle
2 Months

So we have 3 dogs. The puppy is 11 weeks, we have a 5 year old schnauzer and a 2 year old pit bull. The puppy and pit bull play and get along very well. However my 5 year old schnauzer wants nothing to do with the puppy. If the puppy tries to initiate play the schnauzer growls at him. Sometimes it looks like he is trying to play back but he is growling at the same time so I am not sure. We have had the puppy 3 weeks. Just wondering if the schnauzer will accept the new pup at some point.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it seems as though your Schnauzer is adjusting pretty well and will accept the new puppy, but I would take a look here for guidance as well: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. It's important that your Schnauzer still maintain his routine so that he does not resent the new pup. Keep up with his regular walks and attention. Also, the puppy needs to respect the older dogs. These things are explained well in the guide I have linked. Good luck!

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Poppy
Cavapoo
12 Months
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Poppy
Cavapoo
12 Months

I have a male puppy who is 17 weeks, my older female dog is 12 months. She used to pick at her food but since the puppy has arrived he always eat all his then go to eat all hers, so I separated them while eating, she now eats all her meal in one go but if the puppy try’s to go near her while eating she’s still eating she will growl a snap at him but not actually bite him should I stop this? She doesn’t do it if me or the children go near her or we move her bowl while she’s eating. My 6 yr old autistic son got a bit rough with the puppy, he snapped and growled at my son and caught his finger, before we had time to react the older dog started snapping and growling at the puppy until he was cowering in the corner, my husbsnd then pick the puppy up and moved him, I said he should of moved the older dog and ignored the puppy, what should we of done in that situation?
Thanks for listening amanda

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Pretty dogs! Please take a look at the topnotch Methods here for having a new dog in the home. https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog Respect the Resident - remember that the older dog should not have changes in the routine, and should have respect from the puppy. The What Not to Do Method explains that it will not be smooth sailing. I think that you should feed them separately and the puppy should not be allowed to go after the older dog's food (and vice versa).I think that you will need to be watching the puppy and the older dog at all times until they are more used to each other so that a situation like what occurred with your son does not happen again. It could have been worse. Please enroll both of the dogs in obedience classes. If that is not possible, consider having a trainer come to the home to get everyone (people in agreement and dogs on good terms) in order. Good luck!

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Tilly
Border Collie
2 Years
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Tilly
Border Collie
2 Years

Hi there!

We have an 8 year old English Setter (Stella) and a 1.5 year old Border Collie (Tilly). Tilly is incredibly timid and submissive to Stella who, to our human eyes at least, seems to rarely engage or acknowledge Tilly.
When Tilly is excited, whether wanting to play or just excited about anything, she runs over to Stella and crouches, and lunges repeatedly at Stella while licking her face from below. This inevitably ends with Tilly laying on her side or back and peeing herself. We sometimes go several days without a pee (usually if the weather is nice and Tilly gets lots of outdoor play and is good and tired) but sometimes we have several pees a day.
This behaviour has been ongoing since we got Tilly a year and a half ago but for a variety of reasons we never addressed it. At the moment, I am trying to build Tilly's confidence through more individual play and training, I am working on distracting her away from Stella and being calm, and I will try and get her out to socialize with more people and dogs.

What are your thoughts and suggestions?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you have the right idea already. I would have suggested the same things - the outdoor play, the confidence building, distracting her from Stella etc. What about obedience training classes? They are not expensive and accomplish so much. She learns a lot, spends one on one time with you, building a bond, gains confidence, and gets socialized. That would be my suggestion. Teaching Tilly commands gives her a feeling of doing things right is good, too- the Turns Method here is great: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Good luck!

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Gus
Bichon Frise
16 Months
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Gus
Bichon Frise
16 Months

My 16 month old Bichon constantly wants my 5 year old Pitt bull’s attention and be near him. He bites at his legs, ears, mouth, and jumps up on him. He lays by him, drinks out of the bowl,he wants his food even though I separate them when I feed them, and follows him everywhere. As cute as he can be, as tolerant as my Pitt, Lambert can be, it is quite annoying and Lambert gets irritated. I’ve tried distraction, play, separating the two with Lambert then following Gus. It’s becoming stressful. Gus has a back problem and is restricted from walks so not sure how to curb his energy. Any thoughts are appreciated! Thank you!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, As far as energy goes, check out Zach George on Youtube. He has dozens of obedience and trick how to videos. I suggest spending the time you would on walk on 20-30 minute training sessions with Gus, where he has to concentrate a good bit to learn something new or a more difficult version of a current command. Choose commands and tricks he can perform with his back. Mental exercise can be as calming as physical exercise for many dogs. Feeding him part of his meals as puzzle toys and dog food stuffed hollow chew toys or things like Kong wobbles can also give him something fun to do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsxaO44D46I Check out the commands liked below. Work on teaching pup Leave It, Out, and Place and working on his self-control, independence, and calmness through commands like though. Have pup work up to an hour long Place command gradually. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Oggy
Pug
6 Months
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Oggy
Pug
6 Months

I had two 3 year old rescues before oggy. Now that he’s bigger they play fight a lot and I mean a lot. When things get rough oggy gets riled up and won’t leave the dogs alone and it makes them angry. He doesn’t ever know when to stop. What does this mean & how do I train him to leave them alone?

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Gracey
Husky
2 Years
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Gracey
Husky
2 Years

I have 2 Siberian Huskies already at home, Arya and Gracey, they are both 2 years old and female/spayed. We recently added a new Agouti husky to our pack. We introduced them on neutral territory and let everyone check each other out. After that we introduced them again at home with each of our older dogs each on a leash. That went well too. Then we put a puppy play yard in our kitchen and let the dogs all sniff each other through the fence. Once we did that for a while and it went well we took each dog separately with the new puppy. Arya loves the new puppy and is being very gentle/caring towards her. She pushes and plays with the puppy with her mouth closed. When Gracy met the puppy she sniffed her and seemed to get along but then started barking at her and hopping around.
I think she wants to play. Gracey has always been a rough player with Arya. When Gracey wants Arya's attention she does the same thing.
My wife was holding the puppy on the couch this morning and the two girls (Arya/Gracey) came over with me supervising. Arya jumped on the couch to cuddle with the puppy and was very sweet. Gracey was jumping around the couch barking, getting in the puppy's face and trying grab her scruff. This is too rough for the puppy and she has yelped a few times. The puppy is also starting to nip back and bark at Gracey. Do you have any advice on on how to acclimate Gracey to the new puppy? It seems obvious that Gracey wants to play with her but she is too rough. Gracey will be wagging her tail the whole time she is playing and not being aggressive at all.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Andrew, It sounds like a combination of Gracey wanting to play and getting too aroused and rough. First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Instead of letting him out of the crate when he cries, use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for all the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. Things like: no aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no keeping another dog away from an area or person, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if Gracey comes over to your puppy when he is trying to sleep, tell Gracey Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until Gracey leaves the area and stops trying to go back to puppy. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of the dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and the dogs to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have had to use aggression, roughness, hiding, or bullying. Teach puppy and older dog Place - especially your older dog, and have them practice just staying on place when things need to be calmer. If either dog gets too wound up, send them to their crate, exercise pen, or place to calm down with a food stuffed chew toy. Always moderate their play at this stage and interrupt the play and let everyone calm down when things start to get overwhelming for either dog, one starts to bully or act scared, or they are getting highly aroused - When during play wrestling, play growls, and running can be normal, but watch for the energy going up and up and the dogs getting rougher in their play - give breaks when the energy starts to climb and get less gentle. You can practice Jazz Up Settle down at other times to work on impulse control....Get one of the dogs (like Gracey mostly) excited when they are by themselves, then freeze and give a command, then stay frozen and wait for pup to obey. As soon as pup calms down enough to obey, give a treat, tell them Okay and "Go Play', then resume playing again....Practice this with less excitement at first and work up to more excitement before giving the command as they improve and can get themselves under control right away...Expect it to take a few minutes for them to calm down enough to obey at first. At this age, encourage only calm interactions by giving commands like Down-Stay, Place, Out, and Leave It, and using the crate and exercise pen to keep them separate when you can't enforce rules. Reward Gracey for calmness and listening to you around the puppy. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna and Shadow
Labrador Retriever
16 Weeks
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Luna and Shadow
Labrador Retriever
16 Weeks

We have a 16week old lab/border collie mix and 4 yr Female. We are having trouble with Luna jumping on Shadow. We are trying to understand what is Ok playing and what is not between two dogs. When we should be concerned and when not to. We always supervise the play, but we have heard yipping from both. Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cheriese, Good play should look like both dogs taking turns being on top vs. bottom, taking turns chasing vs. being chased, giving breaks when one indicates they need one, and backing off and giving a break when there is a yip. At this age pup is still learning to control the pressure of their bite, but they should learn that when they bite too hard, the other dog will yip and stop playing, and that they should give the other dog a break and be more gentle the next time. If they don't respond that way, step in to give a break. I highly recommend joining a puppy play group because puppies tend to learn best how to control the pressure of their mouth from playing with other puppies. When moderating play, watch for one dog always being on top, always chasing, not giving the other a break when they are trying to pull away, and generally both getting super aroused and that arousal continuing to increase and increase. When you see those things, interrupt play by calling them apart and having them perform a couple commands for treats to calm them down (ideally both dogs going to separate people to work for their treats), then release the calmer of the two dogs who wanted the break first, to see if they re-initiate play. If they do, release the other dog with "Okay!" or "Go Play" and let them resume. If the other dog doesn't initiate play again, they are done for now. Give both a break. Mouthing is normal but there should never be blood drawn. Advocate for the older dog when pup wants to play but they just want to rest or be left alone. Work on commands like Leave It and Out, to enforce pup giving the older dog a break. Generally, let the older dog be the one to decide the most when it's time to play, if pup is usually the initiator of it. Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area - section on using out to deal with pushiness, and how to teach out especially: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maxi
Pug
3 Years
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Maxi
Pug
3 Years

Maxi is terrified of her 7-week old sister (also a pug). Puppy is not aggressive, only playful and active. Tries to initiate play with Maxi, but she will just run the other way. Looks like at times puppy is trying to get a hold of Maxi for milk, which we try to prevent but don't really know how. We want them to be sisters and companions. Maxi is usually not afraid of other older dogs.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I can see that Maxi could be stressed by the fact that the puppy is looking for milk. I think you should keep an eye on that because you don't want a bad relationship to form from the beginning. Please take a look at this guide and read it in its entirety. https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Pay special attention to Respect the Resident Method and the What NOT to Do Method. There are excellent tips for helping Maxi get used to the puppy. As well, the guide mentions behavior that the puppy should be taught as well. Let Maxi know that she is still number one and do not let the puppy mistreat Maxi (even unintentionally). Keep the puppy busy with teething toys (remember her teeth are sharp - another reason she needs to leave Maxi alone and not seek milk). Start teaching the puppy commands needed for good behavior. Happy training!

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Penny
Boxador
18 Months
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Penny
Boxador
18 Months

We introduced a young dog to our 12 year old Pyrenees mix. They have been doing quite good for the first three days yet the older dog still shows her teeth at Penny if she's just walking past her or if she's trying to play. We've been distracting Penny anytime it happens and tell the older dog no as there is no reason she should be growling but it continues to happen.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, bringing a new dog into the life of a 12-year-old canine is quite a change. It's always important to remember that the senior dog is best given special treatment as they adjust. Often when this is the approach, things may go more smoothly. Don't allow Penny to seek out playtime at this point. Take her on long walks for exercise or take a trip to the dog park for play and to run off steam. She may be too exuberant for a 12-year-old dog who could have arthritis or just does not have the desire and energy to play. Make sure that the 12-year-old is getting just as much attention as before, if not even more. Please take a look at the guide here; all of the methods are good. The Respect the Resident Method and the What NOT to Do Method, in particular, are excellent. https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. These tips may help your older dog to adjust. Good luck and enjoy your dogs!

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Ace
Siberian Husky
7 Months
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Ace
Siberian Husky
7 Months

Our new husky puppy ace is causing our senior dog rocky to be agitated and growl and be aggressive toward him.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I have a guide that will give you excellent advice. Please read the entire guide as you will find it very helpful. https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Remember to always treat your senior dog as number one because it is a big change to have a new pup in the house, especially a boisterous one. Ace cannot be allowed to bother the senior dog. Make sure that your older dog has a place to retreat to for quiet, where Ace cannot bother him. Take the two dogs on walks together - this may help them be more comfortable with each other on neutral ground. Ace is a breed that is very high energy, sometimes domineering, and requires a LOT of exercise. Walk him a couple of times per day, lengthy walks at a brisk pace. Make sure he has interactive toys and has plenty of play time in the form of fetch, chase, and time at the dog park with other dogs to socialize him. He can burn off steam there, too. And of course, obedience classes will be a must. Start looking now for a class that is aimed toward energetic dogs. Good luck and keep Ace busy so that he is too tired to bother your older dog. All the best!

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Smokey
Bloodhound
12 Weeks
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Smokey
Bloodhound
12 Weeks

He won’t walk on leash have a open yard but just runs back n sits at the door . Most of all have a very old dog that really didn’t want him to bother him but the puppy is not afraid n just keeps coming back even after older dog growls n moves to another room the pup will follow him ? Help plz

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, first - the older dog deserves to have his peace and quiet. I would get a baby gate for the room the senior dog prefers, so that he can have the rest he needs. Take a look here, especially at the Respect the Resident Method and the Do's and Don'ts Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Remember to try and make things as normal as they can be for the senior canine, which allows for better acceptance. As for the walking on leash, try one of these methods for helping a puppy along: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-an-australian-shepherd-to-walk-on-a-leash. Let Smokey wear his collar around the house, and attach the leash to it a few times a day, even letting him drag it around for a few minutes. Make sure the first leash you get for Smokey is a very light one (even a cat leash) so that it is not intimidating and heavy. Then bring treats along to lure Smokey on the walk. Check the guide I mentioned for more tips. All the best to your dogs!

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Shelby
Husky
8 Months
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Shelby
Husky
8 Months

I have a 17 year old Jack Russel as well as shelby and Shebly constantly torments her. The jack russel is much smaller than Shelby so she cant do anything about it. I don't know what to do. its getting to the point that shelbys play bites are leaving marks on my old girl so shes literally in fear.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is an unfair situation for the older dog. I would keep them separated. The senior dog deserves to be left in peace in her old age. Shelby may injure her with sheer size and weight. I do not think you have any choice but to ensure that your Jack Russell has a gated off room with a comfy bed in which to be safe from injury and not afraid. As for Shelby, it is time for obedience class. This will allow Shelby physical and mental stimulation. Then, your dog will listen to you and learn commands that may allow the two dogs to be in close proximity again. But you cannot do that until Shelby knows commands like sit, stay, down, leave it (to leave the Jack Russell alone), come, etc. Huskies are extremely energetic and Shelby will need a few walks per day, and even a run. Make one of the walks very brisk and long, at the very least. Take Shelby to dog parks for socialization; this may help with the respect toward the older dog. To start basic commands before the obedience classes, start here: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-rottweiler-puppy-to-not-be-aggressive. Good luck!

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Mick
pit mix
10 Years
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Mick
pit mix
10 Years

I’ve had mia since she was 11 weeks and brought her home to Mick. Mick is a rescue and 10 years old. He likes to romp around outside, run for a few minutes but gets tired quickly. I take turns letting them out to potty and to play because I am nervous about the playing off leash. I know my oldest dog would never bite but knowing something could happen in a split second terrifies me. How do I know if they’re okay to be off leash. They’re around eachother in the house off leash, but I always monitor and kind of keep Mia occupied because Mick normally sleeps most of the day.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! There isn't too much advice I can give other than to just let them do it and stay close by. Whenever I have brought a foster dog home, I will put the dogs in my back yard and I will keep the hose handy just in case I need to break up any fighting. But because they have been IN the house with no issues, I am comfortable saying that they should be find outside. Dogs will often have issues indoors, and be great outside (if there is going to be an issue). So give it a try and keep an eye on things. If after a few minutes things seem fine, you can relax and let them have some fun!

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Sidney
Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks
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Sidney
Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks

My collie, Rocky, is a low energy, extremely smart but timid 5 y/o. He is easily intimidated and quirky. He generally asserts dominance over playmates of his own walk of life and has spent every minute of his 5 years with me at work and at home. He is very sensitive.

Sidney is typical herd dog Aussie puppy and is Staring him down, pushing him off toys, water, food... she is being very dominant. I’m spending an equal amount of 1 on 1 time with both. Separating when possible. If I correct her, he thinks he’s in trouble- however with the district use of names in training that is improving. Tonight he tried to get off of “his” chair and she stared him into a corner.... how do I nip this in the bud before it’s a major issue?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maggie, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once she is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Since your older dog worries when you discipline pup, keep your tone very neutral and calm while enforcing the correction calmly with body language - like walking pup out of the area as described in the How to Use Out to Deal With Pushy Behavior section of the Out article. Consistency and calmness tends to work best anyway. To help pup learn self-control also practice regular obedience commands with her so that she respects you - she doesn't necessarily have to respect your older dog to be mannerly toward him - but she does have to respect you and understand what your household rules are for how she is allowed to interact them, then you enforce those rules. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give Rocky a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let Sidney see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. Right now Rocky needs to feel like you are the one managing her, protecting him from her pestering him, and making her appearance pleasant for him. She needs to learn respect for you and what your rules are. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer. Because of her stronger personality, I suggest incorporating regular obedience and training practice into her schedule - the daily mental stimulation will build trust and respect for you, and help her learn self-control and calmness as she grows. Learning new commands and tricks or the next level of a current command can happen in the amount of time pup would go on a walk and actually decrease excess energy as much or more than an extra walk. Basic obedience commands like Sit, Down, Come, Stay, Stand, Place, Watch Me, Out, Quiet, Leave It, Off, and Heel are great things to gradually work on over the next year. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Marley
Dogo Argentino
8 Weeks
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Marley
Dogo Argentino
8 Weeks

I have 11yr old pug and my 8wk seems to keep picking at him. Pug seems unable to defend himself..any advice would be grateful

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While dogs often sort out their issues on their own, some dogs are too submissive to young puppies and never sort out their behavioral stuff. So in the mean time, I am going to send you information on "leave it". Leave it is a great command for anything you want to teach your dog to leave alone or stop going after. Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions

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Guinness
Cocker Spaniel x Poodle
4 Months
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Guinness
Cocker Spaniel x Poodle
4 Months

Hi, we have a 12 year old and a 4 month old. the 4 month old, just wants to be a puppy but he wants to wrestle with the older dog all the time. Sometimes the older dog is ok with this and sometimes not. It's a super hard thing to stop because we want them to interact with each other but the puppy does not seem to get the message from the older dog of when to stop/he has crossed the line. We try to stop it but could use tips!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once she is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Check out the section on Using Out to Deal with Pushy Behaviors to enforce pup leaving the older dog alone when they are being too pushy. Also, see if you can find a puppy kindergarten class or a free puppy play date class, and attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the dogs' or puppies' play and whenever one dog seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Puppies and adult dogs play differently, so their are social skills pup can learn from playing with other puppies that they wouldn't learn from an adult dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nova and Loki
pitbull
7 Months
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Nova and Loki
pitbull
7 Months

Hello!
My SO and I have two pitbull puppies, one is almost 8 months and the other is almost 5 months. The older one, Nova, is the sweetest girl ever. Nova would cry of excitement when she saw other dogs and people. All Nova wanted was a friend, so when her half brother was born we decided to go for it. Loki (the younger brother) was, unbeknownst to us, separated from his mom very, very early. He never really had the chance to learn puppy etiquette. Loki is super sweet as well, but he has bitten Nova numerous times even to the point of scarring. Nova is so sweet she doesn’t ever correct him, and we know he doesn’t mean to hurt her, but it is worrisome. Nova won’t even whimper and then later we find she has gouges in her skin.
We just want the best for our two babies, and we don’t want them hurting each other, so if someone has any advice it is welcome.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello, If you have any friends with older puppies, whose play you can moderate, I would have supervised playdates where you can moderate their play, separate when they get too excited or one pup needs a break, practice a couple of obedience commands, let the more timid pup go first to see if they still want to play, and then let the other pups go too. Puppies learn bite inhibition best from each other before six months of age - don't want! They will often give each other feedback when something is too hard or stop the game, helping the other pups learn to adjust and be more gentle. You will need to help that process a lot by giving breaks if your pup or another is too rough too. With your own dogs, work on teaching your puppy the Leave It and Out commands, and use those commands to be the one to tell pup when they are being too rough with the older dog, and make pup take a break, calm down through some obedience practice with treats, then allow play to resume if your older dog wants it, once pup has calmed back down. Out - which means leave the area https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It - leave it method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s I suggest tethering pup to you with a hands free leash when you can't moderate their play and interactions, and using an exercise pen with dog food stuffed chew toys for the younger puppy to give your older dog a break at times too - puppies tend to need a calm down time when they get especially rough because they are actually overtired. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Murphy
Weimaraner
6 Months
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Murphy
Weimaraner
6 Months

Photos are a rare occurrence! My older boy Monty (11) is my soul mate and has always been glued to my side. Murphy now wants to push in between us and won’t leave Monty alone when he’s near me. Worst is when I work at the kitchen table and Montysits by my side. Murphy just barks and dries and pushes and then bites my arms to get attention and stop me loving Monty. If I put him in time out or in his crate he just screams lie murder!
An6 ideas?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, First, I recommend spending thirty minutes a day having a training session for Murphy where you work on teaching the following commands in the coming weeks. These are good commands for building self-control, respect and trust for you, calmness, and give you a way to direct pup where he should and shouldn't be. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Quiet - Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Out - which means leave the area https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It - leave it method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup is being pushy, send them to Place or use the Out command. Enforce that command very calmly, confidently, but firmly - pup will be trying to get a reaction out of you because they probably find it fun. Calmly insist on follow- through, keeping a drag leash on pup while home if you find you need it to direct pup to Place or out of the room. Once pup is out of the area, or when pup needs to be crated, if they are barking in protest, calmly tell pup Quiet and briefly spray a small puff of air from an unscented air canister called a Pet convincer at pup's side. You may need to tether pup to something with a leash that's long enough to remain on place comfortable, without giving tension on the leash unless they leave place, when its time for pup to give space and they haven't learned a long place command quiet yet. Just as important as the boundaries and corrections is rewarding the right behavior. Have pup work for what they get in life by doing a command before you give them something - like Sit before petting, Down before a game of fetch, heel during walks, ect...When you catch pup doing something polite on their own, like lying on Place quietly, tolerating Monty getting petted without coming over, ect...Calmly place a treat between pup's front paws. Pup needs boundaries, better communication, and rewards for doing the right behavior to help them feel more secure, respect you more, and understand the rules of the family - but remember that pup is young and still learning. This age is essentially puppy teenage-hood so take comfort and compassion in that too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Myla
American Bulldog
8 Weeks
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Myla
American Bulldog
8 Weeks

My new puppy has just arrived and is dominating and bullying my 2 year old Shih Tzu. How do i stop this and help them get along so my Shih Tzu isn’t so frightened of the new puppy?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hollie, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of her age it’s harder for her to handle her and keep up with her energy. She needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from her pestering her, and making her appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to puppy's presence as she grows, especially when he calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later, but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. I find that about half of all older dogs find new puppies stressful at first. Many do adjust as puppy matures though and may even become buddies - you have to add structure and boundaries to help their relationship be calmer and not force interactions though. I would also recommend enrolling puppy in a puppy kindergarten class that has time for moderated, off-leash play with other puppies to help pup learn how to control the pressure of their mouth (best learned during play with other puppies), and socialization. If you have friends with puppies you could also go to each other's fenced yard and set up play dates with them. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arwen
Mixed
8 Months
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Arwen
Mixed
8 Months

Hi there - i’ve the friendliest wee lab in the world who is 6 years old , ultimate mummys boy but will play with anyone and no reasource guarding of food toys or me however we recently adopted a romanian rescue and sometimes my lab wont pass her because she still mouths him to get him to play which he’s not interested in (he only plays tug of war with her) she’s also a sore loser - if he gets the ball before her or wins the toy she barks and jumps all over him... any suggestions

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melissa, First, I recommend teaching the dogs to "honor" each others retrievals - which is when one dog is taught to sit and watch and wait while the other retrieves a toy, until its there turn. This is something commonly taught to hunting dogs since they need to only retrieve their person's ducks and not someone else's from the hunting group. I would play fetch letting the dogs take turns instead of compete for the same ball - since both dogs will be highly aroused while chasing the ball down, and arousal makes dogs feel more aggressive. Practicing the waiting with the chasing turns can help both dogs learn better self-control. I recommend teaching both dogs Out and Leave It, and using those commands to enforce Arwin leaving your lab alone when it comes to the biting, and when your lab tries to go toward Arwin when they get the ball first. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
Miniature Goldendoodle
4 Years
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Max
Miniature Goldendoodle
4 Years

My son adopted a rescue puppy who is 3 months and is a German shepherd mix. When I introduce the puppy to Max, she wants to play but she is nipping at his feet and ears and body constantly. I try to let Max correct her, but she gets more rough with him and snarling and growling at him with her hair raised up on her back. I do step in and separate the dogs. I like for them to be able to be in the same room without Max being terrorized by the puppy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pat, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. For the biting, I recommend teaching pup Out and Leave It. Out - which means leave the area. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ginger
Pomeranian
9 Weeks
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Ginger
Pomeranian
9 Weeks

Pup wants to chase and get in her space of an 11 year old female Shih tzu.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Prentice, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once she is crate trained, crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (probably puppy most of the time). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ You can also work on Leave It: Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or hide. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Finally, see if there is a good puppy class that has time for moderated off-leash play with other similar age puppies. Playing with other puppies is how puppies best learn doggie social cues - like giving each other breaks, and controlling the pressure of their mouths. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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coraline
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks
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coraline
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks

my pup is constantly biting peoples hands, feet etc and nipping and chasing my older dog also a lab , we have tried ignoring her, making a yelping noise, exchanging us for a toy....

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Milo
Border Collie
14 Weeks
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Milo
Border Collie
14 Weeks

I have 5 years old border collie and a 14 weeks old border collie. They get along very well. However, when I take them for walks Milo (14 week old pup) keep jumping onto my older dog. How can I stop the jumping during the walks?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aura, First, I would work on teaching the puppy to heel without your other dog. Check out the Turns or Treat Lure methods from the article linked below - pup is currently jumping on the older dog to try to get them to play for entertainment, most likely, so using treats to motivate pup to heel gives pup something else fun to focus on. Heel: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Once pup can heel well and focuses on you during the walk, begin walking the dogs together again. Keep the dogs on separate sides at first and reward pup for heeling and focusing on you. With the dogs on separate sides, when pup tries to cross in front or behind you to get to your other dog, use the leash to direct pup back to their spot so you don't trip on them, while also turning abruptly in front of pup - like if pup is walking on your left side, turn left in front of pup, so that they have to refocus back on where you are walking to make the turn with you and get out of your way. Reward pup as soon as they refocus on you. You will need some patience with this! If will likely take some practice and consistency to get puppy to leave your older dog alone and focus on the walk - but you are also teaching good heeling, attention around distractions, and leaving your older dog alone, so pup is actually learning a lot of things they can use later. Finally, I would teach pup the Leave It and Out commands so that you can use those to tell pup to give your older dog space as needed too. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If your older dog doesn't heel well, you will want to work with them on that separate of puppy also, so that you can rely on them to heel while walking the dogs together, and focus more of your attention on the puppy. Depending on your older dog's level of training, I would often have my older dog on a hands-free leash (that dog was off leash trained at that point though so I wasn't worried about being pulled off my feet) so that I could focus on training the puppy and maneuvering puppy's leash better during the early months. This may or may not be an option for you, depending on whether your older dog is trained well enough to be reliable to never pull. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Aizen
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks
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Aizen
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks

How do we train our older dog and our new puppy to bond. Our older Labrador retriever corrects him but sometimes he doesn’t not seem to listen and gets even more excited what do we do in this situation ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ophelia, Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lon
cockapoo
11 Years
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Lon
cockapoo
11 Years

Lon is fearful of 8 week old poodle pup. Every time the pup see’s Lon, she chases and tries to bite Lon. Lon appears fearful and runs like heck from the pup. If we are all in the same room, Lon hides behind my legs from the pup every time. It’s been 2 weeks since we brought the pup home and the mentioned behaviors have not improved.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angela, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like puppy whenever she is pestering Lon). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when they are trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to them, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup if they antagonized first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give Lon a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever Lon is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give them a treat. Try not to let the puppy see you rewarding them though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm them. Right now Lon probably feels overwhelmed by the new arrival and because of Lon's age it’s harder for them to handle her and keep up with her energy. They need to feel like you are the one managing her, protecting them from her pestering them, and making her appearance pleasant for them. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then they may adjust to her presence as she grows, especially when she calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. Puppy may also benefit from some puppy playdates with other puppies, through friends, a puppy class with time for off-leash play, or play group. Puppies tend to learn social manners and how to control their mouths from playing with other similar aged puppies, best. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Puppy is Monte and senior is Tatem
Monte is mini bull terrier. Tate is Bull Terrier
10 Weeks
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Puppy is Monte and senior is Tatem
Monte is mini bull terrier. Tate is Bull Terrier
10 Weeks

Monte the mini bull terrier pup is learning not to bite us and is much more gentle when he does. However he nips Tatem the ten year Bull Terrier pretty hard. Once so hard Tate gave a loud Yelp and she has a high tolerance to pain! He stopped for a second but tried to play again..
We have let the two have contact gradually .. Monte is in his playpen so the two dogs can be in the same room with us.
Tate seems to have accepted him into the pack... she invites him to play with her toys. But Monte is vey nippy with her although it is playful it’s too rough. Tate looks at me for guidance as to what to do with the little nipper or she walks away. She has nipped at him but didn’t touch him. Well she did butt him away with her head.
My concern is because Tatem is so much bigger and could seriously hurt this puppy if she corrects him too hard..
But if I always help her out by distracting the puppy or taking him away from her; will the puppy see her as a weak member of the pack? Also Tate has not learned how to play gently ... she will pull the toy from Monte a bit too hard.. still teaching that.
Help! How do I deal with this?
Thanks
Sharon

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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roscoe
Pit bull mix
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
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roscoe
Pit bull mix
6 Weeks

I have two older dogs one 14 yrs old and other 6 yrs old. We recently got a puppy and my son is trying to train him. he is very good but when other dogs are around puppy will not leave them alone. he bites and jumps on them and will not stop. My son is getting so upset and thinks he cannot keep puppy. What to do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jennifer, For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dogs so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dogs to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ For the pee pad training, I recommend following the Crate Training or Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. If pup tends to pee next to the pad instead of on it, even with the exercise pen method, then follow the crate training method for a couple of weeks until pup has learned to target the pad, then you can switch to the exercise pen method for the convenience of that method if you prefer to use that instead of the crate training method over the next couple months. Exercise pen method or crate training method - these methods can be used with pee pads, disposable real grass pads, or litter boxes, not just with litter boxes. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Finally, when you aren't supervising pup with the older dogs, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dogs a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dogs as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Know that this behavior is also normal though. Enrolling pup in a puppy kindergarten class or letting pup play with other young puppies can help pup learn to control the pressure of their bite also, once pup is old enough to join a class. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mochi
Maltese
9 Years
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Mochi
Maltese
9 Years

I have an older Maltese and she’s quite small and tomorrow, I will be getting a German Shepard/ lab mix puppy and I need that puppy to make sure not to mess with our older dog and not to hurt her and make sure she’s off limits from the start. What’s something I can do from the start to help the puppy understand that my older dog isn’t an option for having fun or playing?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jason, I recommend teaching pup the Out (which means leave the area), Leave It, and Place commands. I also recommend crate training pup, and when you can't directly supervise the dogs together give pup dog food stuffed hollow chew toys - like kongs, in the crate or exercise pen, or tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash, to manage their interactions until pup learns to give the older dog space. Out - especially the section on how to teach Out and how to use Out to deal with pushy behavior, once pup has learned what Out means. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place - this can be a place where pup can go to chew on toys and relax while the dogs are in the same room, if pup is feeling tempted to keep going over to your older dog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Crate Training - Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nora
Lab/Pit mix
5 Months
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Nora
Lab/Pit mix
5 Months

My best friend has a 1 year old lab/pit mix that is very submissive and gentle. My puppy is bold and outgoing. When they play they both seem to be having a good time and neither show fear or aggression. Both are exited to play together. However, my puppy is leaving bite marks on the older dog. The older dog does not yelp or give any signal when my puppy bites to hard. Any tips on how to teach my puppy to be more gentle?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tasha, When she gets to worked pup playing and is biting hard, I recommend interrupting the play, having her preform a couple commands to earn treats and calm down, then once calm, if your older dog still wants to play, you can allow them to resume. I also recommend seeing if there are other puppies your dog can play with in your area, such as friends' puppies, a play group, or class. Puppies tend to learn how to control the pressure of their mouths and take breaks as needed best from other puppies and the feedback they give during play. The Out and Leave It commands are good commands to teach to manage biting. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Vinnie
Shih Tzu
4 Months
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Vinnie
Shih Tzu
4 Months

We got vinnie around 8 weeks ago and we already have a 5 year old Shorkie named Belle.

Vinnie is overly confident and very boisterous and even when belle growls or snaps at him he does not back down. He keeps going at her until he yelps and Belle runs away (she's a softy and doesn't want to think she's hurt him) but even when she runs away he follows and posters, or we physically remove him from the situation.

Belle also hates when he runs into a room - which is does as a puppy a lot. She will jump off the sofa and growl and growl and snap uncontrollably at him.

We have a play pen for him during the day but we don't want to keep in there all day. He goes in there for meals and naps.


Any advice to assist with these issues would be great

They're great on walks together, even have play fights while out but not in our house or garden. However they will sit on the sofa together if there is a human between.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Vinnie needs to learn to respect Belle and she should not have to put up with his puppy antics all of the time. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. The What NOT to Do Method and the Respect the Resident Method are both important. Remember Belle was there first and may find Vinnie an intrusion. Her world has turned upside down and Vinnie cannot be allowed to edge her on when she's had enough. Make sure she has a place where she can retreat to for peace and a little rest when she is in the mood for that. Once a few boundaries and rules are put in place, I am sure they will get along. Keep working to train Vinnie and make sure that he gets plenty of exercise! That way he will not bother Belle quite as much. Happy training and all the best to both dogs!

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Millie
Chihuahua
12 Weeks
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Millie
Chihuahua
12 Weeks

Millie is constantly yapping and barking at older dog Max who is 11. I keep separating them but then we they rejoin it starts again and Max barks back quite aggressively this can go on for ages until one of us steps in.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This is tricky because it sounds like they are not sorting out their items on their own. Dogs are usually excellent communicators. One harsh bark from and older dog will usually put a puppy in its place. Normally I tell people to let their dogs sort it out over the course of a few days. But that is not working! So you will have to step in and teach them how to operate as a team. Do everything with them together. Walks together, teaching training commands together, games, other forms of exercise, etc. Also try to fill their food bowls at the same time if possible. That way neither of them is eating before the other.

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Hannah
Cane Corso
1 Year
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Hannah
Cane Corso
1 Year

Hannah is beginning to instigate fights with my 14yo cocker spaniel, Lilo. She will stand over Lilo and out her face in hers until Lilo gets mad and attacks her. Then Hannah will fight back and pin her down. The problem is Hannah is a young, fit 100lb mastiff and Lilo is an elderly 30lb cocker. Hannah has only left a few superficial wounds on Lilo so it tells me it is more of a dominance issue then just aggression. This behavior started over night tho. They got along just fine till 2 days ago and even slept together at night. Now I can't have them in the same room.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stephanie, I agree that it does appear to be an issue of competing for dominance and control, with Hannah being the instigator. There may be something that started it that you are unaware of but Hannah approaching sexual and metal maturity with age may also be why it's becoming more obvious now. I recommend desensitizing the dogs to wearing a basket muzzle, especially Hannah, using food rewards gradually. I would also work on building Hannah's respect for you through obedience drills, structured routines, and how you interact with the dogs and mediate their interactions with each other. I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to work with you on how to do this in your own home in person. Look for someone who comes well recommended for aggression and behavior issues from their previous clients. Since Hannah is a lot bigger than Lilo you don't want them working it out themselves. You want both dogs, especially Hannah, to trust and respect you, for you to create new rules about how they are allowed to interact with each other, then you safely enforce those rules while things like basket muzzles, drag leashes, and commands are used to manage their interactions - until all is needed is voice control. You want Hannah to learn to respect Lilo as an extension of you, not because Lilo has to gain Hannah's respect herself. This should be done calmly, consistently and through a lot of proactive training and practice with obedience commands, not through things that will cause Hannah to react defensively toward you - like rolling a dog onto their back. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koda
Pit bull
9 Weeks
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Koda
Pit bull
9 Weeks

Our older pup is not even 3 years old yet so she will grab a toy if he is sleeping and squeak it by him to get him to mess with her instead if eating or sleeping. She loves playing with him but she does get jealous as we are trying to train him. But we make her do he tricks for treats also? So what do I do? Usually I am good at this. I didnt think my bf would let me get our new pup, Koda(9 weeks)
To play & keep with our 1.5 year old Bailey(female).

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tara, When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out and Leave It commands (Out means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your puppy). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching both Place, so that when the temptation to bother is too great, or you are trying to train the other dog, you can send the second dog to Place. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s In general as puppy grows, I recommend the following to help prevent jealously and competing. Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your younger dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If pup obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking Bailey from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog growls at your puppy, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of the dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because either had to resort to pushiness or aggression or avoid the other dog to be left alone. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Donovan
Rottweiler pitbull Mix
6 Weeks
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Donovan
Rottweiler pitbull Mix
6 Weeks

We have a 8 month old rotty pit mix puppy AND now a 6 week old rotty pit mix puppy - same breed and same parents / different litter. Breeder sold all puppies before 4 weeks so this guy hasn’t been with his playmates since about 5 weeks. Our goal is to socialize Donovan (6 wk pup) with Maverick (8 mo pup) to help psychological and physical behavior in the long run instead of leaving him with his breeder all alone not allowing 6 wk pup to have any interactions or socialize with other dogs /puppies in general. We have now taken him on and welcomed Donovan into our family. So the issue is... Donovan has a very very strong personality and he is not afraid of anything and is very adventurous. Completely different from when Maverick was a puppy. This puppy plays pretty aggressively with Maverick. Maverick is very gentle and lets Donovan play very rough with him. Yesterday Donovan was playing “tug a war” and yanking on Mavericks lip. Donovan was growling and and nipping at Maverick after 10 min of playing. I could tell Donovan was getting heated with Mav and Maverick wasn’t even really doing anything. I feel like I can determine what is playful and what is aggressive and this looked in my eyes pretty aggressive. When Maverick tries to put new puppy in his place, Donovan reacts intensely and growls, snarles, barks, bites and it looks vicious. Maybe this was play? But it really sounded and looked super aggressive and was different behavior than there normal play. Is my 6 week old puppy aggressive? Should I be concerned? Is this normal behavior for a 6 week old puppy? Donovan is very “with it” and smart. He doesn’t even pee in crate anymore and barks at me when he needs something. Again, just a very very strong personality. He’s never show any aggression towards me or my senior female Pomeranian. Just Maverick, our 8 month old male pup. Any recommendations or thoughts on this would be great. Thanks! Sarah

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Puppies learn by testing the boundaries and it sounds like that is exactly what he is doing. It is best to let them sort it out on their own. If we step in, they don't really understand it as much as when the reaction comes from another dog. He is in his prime socialization stage and really needs those interactions with littermates. Maverick is the next best thing and it sounds like he is being gentle with him which is really sweet. But it is likely that he will stick up for himself if things go too far. Keep an eye on Donovan over the next few weeks. As he learns boundaries, this behavior should start to become less severe. It is a good idea to start working on training commands with him so he starts to learn that the things you say are commands and expectations.

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Hoosier
Labrador Retriever
13 Months
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Hoosier
Labrador Retriever
13 Months

Our Puppy is aggressive towards our 10 year old when coming in from outside. Biting his ear and his neck area. Our older dog is very sweet and just wants to away when this occurs. It’s only this time. Thank you

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This is tricky because it sounds like they are not sorting out their items on their own. Dogs are usually excellent communicators. One harsh bark from and older dog will usually put a puppy in its place. Normally I tell people to let their dogs sort it out over the course of a few days. But that is not working! So you will have to step in and teach them how to operate as a team. Do everything with them together. Walks together, teaching training commands together, games, other forms of exercise, etc. Also try to fill their food bowls at the same time if possible. That way neither of them is eating before the other.

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Mocha
Pit bull
6 Weeks
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Mocha
Pit bull
6 Weeks

Good afternoon, my puppy keeps trying to bite and teeth of everyone and everything she encounters we constantly tell her to stop and she continues. She also likes to try to harass my other elder dog and chases him. Can you help me please ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Andrew, First, when pup is old enough look for a puppy class that has time for puppy play, and you can attend one of those with her so that she can learn how to control the pressure of her bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next month while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but they can also be a great way to create your own puppy class with pup. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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pebbles
American Bulldog
6 Weeks
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pebbles
American Bulldog
6 Weeks

i have an older dog who is a british bulldog and she is old now and starting to feel her age, the puppy keeps going at the older dog biting her and sucking her nipples my dog is now starting to growl she would never hurt her but how can i prevent the puppy from doing this so they both feel happy in their home?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Millie, At 6 weeks pup was really too young to be taken away from her mother. She was probably only weaned the week before, so that's likely why she is trying to nurse. How is pup's eating and drinking? If it doesn't seem to be as good as it needs to be, I would speak with your vet about that, and whether pup needs kibble to be watered down with puppy milk replacement. I suspect she is okay without but speak with your vet if there is any doubt. I am not a vet. As far as pestered your older dog, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dog so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dogs to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I recommend following the Crate Training or Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. Exercise pen method or crate training method - these methods can be used with pee pads, disposable real grass pads, or litter boxes, not just with litter boxes for indoor potty training - if that's your end goal. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Crate training method - for outside potty training, if that's your goal: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Finally, when you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dog a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dogs as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Be patient with pup, this is normally the age where they would be wrestling with other puppies and learning about biting that way too, so this will take some practice over several weeks, and that's normal. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Benji and Gohan
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Years
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Benji and Gohan
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Years

We got Benji, who is around 8yrs old, 2 years ago. He is a rescue. We just got our 6 month old Siberian Husky when he was 7 weeks old. Since bringing him home, we have had to re-crate Benji as he was acting up around the house by peeing and pooping everywhere, even on the couch which he is no longer allowed on. We have slowly been allowing Gohan and Benji some play time. It goes well for the most part, Gohan is high energetic and playful and Benji isn’t always a fan of that. They have played tug of war for a few seconds here and there. However, Benji is always on high alert as soon as one of Gohan’s toys comes out that he wants. He tends to steal the toy and run away somewhere to destroy it (we buy him mostly kongs because he is an aggressive chewer). I’m not sure what to do as a pet owner to ensure both dogs are happy. Please help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the peeing and pooping everywhere is no doubt a stress reaction on Benji's part. His world has changed a lot and he may not know how to cope just yet. It's important to make sure that Benji's routine and sense of being number 1 do not change. Take him for lots of walks (even more often than before). When Gohan comes along, this will help as it will allow the dogs to get to know each other on neutral ground. Don't allow Gohan to bother Benji - make sure that Benji has a quiet place to go and rest when he wants to, where Gohan won't arrive and interrupt. This guide has great tips; read it in full as it gives good advice on helping both dogs adjust, but especially Benji: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Make sure you are working on obedience training with Gohan (and Benji, too - it never hurts to refresh the commands): https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. Good luck!

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Lily
Jack Russell Terrier
13 Weeks
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Lily
Jack Russell Terrier
13 Weeks

Hi,
We brought Lily, our beautiful but boisterous pup, into our home 5 weeks ago. We have managed to train her well in her crate and on the lead, but we can't train her to get on with our 9 yr old dog Gizmo (Jack Russell X Chihuahua).

She will jump right for him as soon as she is let out, and because she is so stubborn no matter how much we put her back down, she'll jump right back up. Our older dog growls and snarls at her, and if they get to each other gizmo pushes her down to the floor.

Our main question is do we have to separate them when they fight, or should we wait for one of them to back down?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, I would mediate their interactions and you be the one to teach pup and separate, so that your older dog doesn't feel as defensive and it will be less likely to turn into future aggression issues between them. For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dog so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dog to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, when you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dog a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dog as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Herbie
Whippet
3 Months
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Herbie
Whippet
3 Months

We have just introduced Herbie to our 8 year old whippet Chloe. Herbie is very boisterous and won’t leave her alone. Chloe is trying to correct but it’s getting increasingly aggressive. We’re worried they are not going to work it out for themselves and one dog is going to get hurt. Help! We’re at the end of our tether three weeks in.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alice, I would mediate their interactions and you be the one to teach pup and separate, so that your older dog doesn't feel as defensive and it will be less likely to turn into future aggression issues between them. For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dog so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dog to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ When you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dog a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dog as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ When your older dog is being tolerant and calm when puppy is around you can also give your older dog a treat without puppy seeing you do it - you don't want pup running over to beg for one too and overwhelming your older dog, so be sneaky about it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
German Shepherd
4 Months
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Duke
German Shepherd
4 Months

My puppy is continuously biting my older dog and won’t stop. We have tried chew toys, redirection, separating them. Nothing is working.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shannon, For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dog so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dog to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, when you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dog a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dog as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ It can take some time for puppies to learn self-control. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bríndal
Cockers & pitbull
1 Year
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Bríndal
Cockers & pitbull
1 Year

Hi
My finance and I go on walks with our fur babies and she’s the 7 year old and listens very well off leash, but I am the owner of the two cocker spaniels and don’t agree with dogs off leash and I was wondering if this could be in any way harmful to the dog relationship.
Dogs are 1 & 2 both mine -cocker spaniels always on leash
Finance pitbull/chihuahua and she’s 7 and off leash

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, In most cases that should be fine. What I would encourage is having the Pitbull heel so they are also walking with you, instead of having them run back and forth and roam further away. The Pitbull being off leash shouldn't be an issue between the dogs is they are walking with you. If they are running about and making the spaniels want to follow, they may feel frustrated being leashed because they want to roam after the other dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bella
Dachshund
8 Months
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Bella
Dachshund
8 Months

The older dog (the white one buddy) only sometimes wants to play however Bella always wants to play and has razor sharp teeth she is always nipping buddy and forcing him to fight back. Buddy will sometimes want to play but only for around 5mins then gets irritated and tries to run away. The photo I included was the only time they’ve sat together without Bella nipping and jumping all over buddy. I thought this would calm down but after 6 months she is still in crazy mode. Buddy does not stand up for himself instead just gets bitten and jumped all over. I’ve tried techniques such as putting Bella in ‘time out’ which is essentially putting her in the bathroom for 5mins (which is boring and she cries). What else can I do to calm her down and make them be friends?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, my first recommendation would be to start obedience training with Bella right away. This can either be in-class training or at home, but it has to be consistent. Bella cannot continue to be allowed to bother Buddy this way as I am afraid it may only get worse. Buddy is the older resident and deserves respect - I know you agree and that is why you are writing in, but I have to emphasize that Bella can be taught to leave Buddy in peace. Does Buddy have a place he can retreat to when he feels like being alone? He should. Other excellent tips can be found here: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Please read the entire guide and especially take note of the Respect the Resiedent Method as it will give you the tips you are looking for. As you work on training Bella, I would have her sit before every event to teach her to listen to you (sit before her meal is placed down, sit before she gets her leash on for a walk, sit before playtime, etc). She'll learn that she needs to listen to get good things. Here is a good article on the basis of training:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. I would also look into training in your area because socializing Bella will help, and the mental and physical exercise will tire her out, calming her down at home. Good luck!

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Missy
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
8 Weeks
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Missy
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
8 Weeks

Missy being the younger pup will initiate play on waking and is always very boisterous. Loki is 9 months and being a pup himself will happily play with Missy and will initiate play too but, when the face biting and growling from Missy begins I feel it is too much.
I appreciate the older dog will normally discipline/ reprimand the younger but they’re both pups!
We have baby gates already for Loki so that’s normal life for him.
1- Utility room where the crate is
2 - Kitchen where 2 large beds are
Hallway and front room, dining room all with doors.

I don’t want my Davis to think when they’re together it has to be crazy play and my son hates them being separated.
Please advise

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nikki, What you are describing does sound normal at this age, but I would also mediate their play and teach some commands to help you regulate when they can play, when they need to give each other a break playing, and when you simply just want things to be calm in the home. Out - which means leave the area, can be used to command them to leave one another alone when one needs a break. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method - when one starts to play and you don't want them to begin: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command - to teach them to simply hang out in the same room calmly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s You may also need to keep a leash that drags on the floor, on them when you are home to supervise and make sure it doesn't get caught on anything, while you are first working on the commands and new rules. If one dog isn't obeying a command, then you can calmly walk over, pick up the end of the leash and enforce out or Place. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hailey and Jasper
German Shepherd
12 Years
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Hailey and Jasper
German Shepherd
12 Years

I have a female GSD who is 12ys old and has started to have some hip issues she where’s a hip brace for extra support cause she can’t move as quickly anymore she has not loss any muscle mass in her hind quarters but her gait has changed to cow hawked. But my mom got a shih tzu puppy and he is 16wks now but Hailey still runs away from him she sometimes will lick him and show some type of interest in trying to play but it’s short lived. I don’t want him to hurt her cause she does get off balanced sometimes but I do think she needs to set him straight what do I do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tina, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dogs so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dogs to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, at this age when you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dog a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dogs as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tedy
Pomeranian
13 Weeks
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Tedy
Pomeranian
13 Weeks

We have a senior dog who likely has canine dementia and a new puppy. The new puppy keeps trying to play with the senior, but the senior doesn't know how to play but doesn't seem to know how to communicate that to the puppy. Other than locking one of them in another room, how can we help these two learn to live together?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erin, Hello Lizzi, I would work on crate training pup, teaching Out - which means leave the area, teaching Leave It, and Place. These commands, once learned, can help them learn when to give space. You will need to be the one to create and enforce rules for the dogs, instead of depending on your older dog to teach pup. The Out method can be especially helpful. I recommend crating pup or putting pup in an exercise pen with dog food stuffed chew toys when you can't supervise them together at pup's age. You can also use a hands-free leash to tether pup to yourself. Adding a simple carabiner to your regular leash handle or purchasing something like Vir-Chew-Ly chew proof leashes, can help with tethering, Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Surprise method - crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I would consider enrolling in a puppy kindergarten class to help pup learn to adapt their play to be gentle and provide the socialization your older dog can't give. Check out the article linked below on classes. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dani
Golden Retriever
1 Year
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Dani
Golden Retriever
1 Year

My golden Dani keeps jumping on my older 11 year old border collie Ace’s back of his neck then trying to play. Ace does not want to play. Sometimes he is just wandering the yard and she will come running up to him and jump on him to play knocking him down. He now will just stand on the porch not going in the yard for fear of her coming at him. What can I do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rita, I recommend working on Leave It, Out, and Come commands with her, then working up to pup obeying those commands around your other dog. To start, I would purchase a padded back clip harness and long leash, and when you can't supervise the dogs, keeping them apart of her in the crate, and when you can supervise, practice her being on the long leash, with no more than 10" feet at first to keep her from jerking the leash out of your yards or harming herself. Use the commands you have taught to teach her to give him space, then use the leash to reel her if she disobeys and tries to pester him again. Practicing consistently that way until she will respond to your commands before having to reel her in, at which point you can transition to just a short drag leash and commands but still supervising, then no leash and just commands, then give more freedom with them together similar to what you are doing right now, again. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Griff
Goldendoodle
7 Months
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Griff
Goldendoodle
7 Months

I have two 12 year old Silky Terriers (brothers) and I recently brought home a 7 month old Goldendoodle, my Silkies are not able to keep up with him to play with him and they're getting irritated. They snap and bark at him every time he try's to play but the puppy doesn't understand that they aren't playing and tries to play with them when they do that, what should I do to get them get along?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lincoln, Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dogs a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding them (or each of the older dogs the other one) though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. While you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering one of your older dogs). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dogs because you have taught it to him and not because your older dogs have had to resort to aggression or have to hide all the time. If pup is doing a lot of play biting, I also recommend teaching Leave It. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bruce
French Bulldog
8 Weeks
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Bruce
French Bulldog
8 Weeks

I have 2 FB pups 1 is very dominant. I have a 8 month old shih tzu who's submissive to the point it looks like she’s being bullied, should I step in?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karen, I generally recommend moderating interactions and play when one dog seems stressed or tired, and the other one isn't giving them a break on their own. First, I highly suggest crate training the puppies. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pups at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppies should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach all dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if a pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by having them give space for antagonizing if they pestered first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppies to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to them and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pups to be free but don't want to chase after them while you are home, you can also clip one of them to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever a puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppies see you rewarding her though so that they don’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup. She needs to feel like you are the one managing pups, protecting your older dog from them pestering her, and making their appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to pup's presence as they grows, especially when he calms down when older. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Pug
12 Weeks
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Daisy
Pug
12 Weeks

Hi, I have a 12 week old pug (girl - Daisy) and already have a 5 year old pug (boy - Harry). Daisy is constantly attempting to play with Harry but he obviously can't be bothered or he's quite frightened by her since she's always attempting to bite his tail or jump on top of him.

I find Harry sometimes hides under table or in corner because I think he's worried she might do it again. I try my best to stop it when it happens and tell Daisy 'no' but it's not improving. I feel really bad for him he's such a good dog and really friendly and placid who gets on with any person or dog. Can you suggest anything?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tom, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I also recommend starting to teach pup the Leave It command from the article I have linked below. This will take some time for pup to gain the self-control needed, so a bit of perseverance will be needed at this age. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make him leave the room while also disciplining pup by having her leave if she was pestering. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give Harry a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of Daisy also give him a treat. Try not to let pup see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. Right now Harry probably feels overwhelmed by her and because of his age it’s harder for him to handle her and keep up with her energy. He needs to feel like you are the one managing her, protecting him from her pestering him, and making her appearance pleasant for him. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then he may adjust to her presence as she grows, especially when she calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shadow
German Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Shadow
German Shepherd
9 Weeks

We have an 11 year old labrador retriever and an 8 year old cat. We got the puppy a week ago when she was 8 weeks old. She doesn't seem to want to leave our lab alone and tries to climb on her, jumps at her face and nips at her face and neck. We have been telling her no and tapping her on the nose when she does it but its not stopping. We've tried to redirect her with toys but when our older dog moves she watches her intently and then decides to chase her. I know the nipping is probably just a puppy thing but its tormenting our older dog. Our lab has had a go at her a couple of times by barking and growling at her but she keeps going back. Its come to the point where we don't know if we need to rehome the german shepherd. Hope you can help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lottie, Most puppies do not understand boundaries with other dogs very well yet, especially more outgoing puppies. Having pup join a class or play group with other young puppies can help pup learn social skills and control of their bite pressure sooner, but in general this does take time and pup maturing to improve. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Even though it's normal and it can take time to improve, that doesn't mean however that you need to just let it happen. I do highly recommend intervening and preserving the peace in the household to prevent aggression or fear leading to a bad relationship between them later. For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dogs so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dogs to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I would also crate train the puppy, and when you can't supervise the dogs together, give pup a dog food stuffed chew toy and have them rest in an exercise pen or crate. Crate training is also helpful for preventing destructive chewing habits from developing - teaching pup to chew their own toys instead, potty training, and even preventing future separation anxiety later, by helping pup learn gradually how to handle some independence now. You can also tether the puppy to yourself with a hands free leash when your older dog needs a break but you don't want to have to intervene between them so much yourself. If you are concerned for the puppies safety, I would hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and comes well recommended by their clients in this area, to come to your home in person, evaluate the dogs together and step in to help with the training and management of the two dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Monty
Goldendoodle
18 Weeks
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Monty
Goldendoodle
18 Weeks

Monty is constantly attacking our 10 yo scottish terrier. He butts his entire body up against him , bites his ears and beard. We have done all recommend things and he will not let up. Advise??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melissa, Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. After you teach Out, pay special attention to the section on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I also recommend teaching pup Leave It. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by having them move away for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dogs because you have taught it to him and not because your older dogs have had to resort to aggression or hide all the time. I would also use a hands free leash for times when you want pup to be free but they aren't respecting your dog's space. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever older dogs are calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give them a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding them though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm the dog getting the treat though. When puppies are overly excited, the often need a nap, or mental stimulation as well. I would give pup a dog food stuffed chew toy in their crate to help them rest and calm down for a bit, or have a training session with pup or a puzzle type toy to give mental stimulation. In general, do know that pup's behavior is normal at this age. Check out the resources below to help pup learn more manners in general as they mature. Also, know that maturity with age tends to help many dogs as well. Chewing: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ What I gave above is a lot of info and things to teach. Try not to feel overwhelmed by too much info. This info is for the next 6+ months, expect gradual progress as you raise pup to be a well mannered and enjoyable pup who can fit in with the family, instead of instant results in the next week. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hershey
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year
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Hershey
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year

At home I already have a 7 year old spitz female dog (her name is Khloe) and a 3 years male shiba inu (his name is hutchy). In my other house I got a male Yorkshire terrier who’s 1.5 years (his name hershey) and need to put him with my 2 other dogs in the same house. Each of them has a different behavioral issue, khloe doesn’t let any dog touch her, hershey is protective over khloe and Hershey is very hyperactive and all three are very attached to me. Hershey keeps jumping on khloe since she’s the female and whenever hutchy gets annoyed he bites hershey but doesn’t draw blood. I need hutchy to stop interfering and if I’m lucky start playing with hershey, khloe to start accepting hershey at least play with her and Hershey to give khloe and hutchy some space.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leila, I would teach all the dogs directional, management commands, like Leave It, Out, and Place. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also work on building all of the dogs' respect for you, since it sounds like listening could be improved and there may be some possessiveness of you. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you I do recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, will come to your home to train there, comes well recommended by their previous clients, and can work with you in person, one-on-one, to help. Having someone evaluate the interactions and body language between the dogs, as well as what the current boundaries and relationship with each with you are is important for addressing some of the underlying issues that are likely going on. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nellie
cockapoo
6 Months
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Question
1 found helpful
Nellie
cockapoo
6 Months

Nellie is aggressively attacking our older dog whenever he tries to come near me. She is particularly aggressive if food is involved.

Our older dog is now afraid to come too close.

We have tried isolating Nellie when she displays this behaviour but we are very concerned and would welcome any advice.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marsha, It sounds like pup is possessive of you, which is a form of resource guarding people. This is likely related to a lack of respect for you. I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, to work on both the resource guarding and possessiveness of you. This will probably involve things like having pup earn everything they get in life by obeying a command before you pet, feed, play with, or give attention to them, giving more consistent boundaries and rules for the dogs, you being the one to enforce rules calmly between them, practicing obedience commands that build respect, like Down-Stay, long Place command, structured Heel, crate training, Leave It, Quiet, and Out. In addition to building respect for you, with safety measures like a back tie leash, pup can also be desensitized to your other dog approaching when they have a toy, giving treats for pup responding with relaxed body language when your other dog passes by, putting enough distance between them that you can get that calm response to reward, then very gradually decreasing the distance between them as pup begins to associate the other dog's presence with good things and feels less tense around them. This helps build trust between the dogs, while controlling the situation for safety and training purposes. When you can't control the setting, I would keep the things pup is guarding put up, feed the dog in separate closed crates, and get a solid 1 hour place command worked up to for both, to give space between them when in the same room. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Smokey
Tri coloured stumpy tailed cattle
8 Years
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Question
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Smokey
Tri coloured stumpy tailed cattle
8 Years

We got Smokey as a rescue dog so we are not really sure of his age or his back ground history with other dogs but he was fully grown when we got him and we have had him for 8 years. Could be 10 years old, Our son has a Australian Kelpie that is about 7 months old now and we are trying to get the two to get along. He has lashed out and bitten her on the face twice with one resulting in a visit to the vet. Both times Smokey will run away as he knows he has done something wrong. At times she will jump at his face and annoy him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Beth, First, since there has been an attack where blood was drawn, I would recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, comes well recommend by their previous clients, and will come to your home, to help in person with this training need. I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness or mild resource guarding. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes! Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog pushes pup or gets between you and pup uninvited, tell your older dog Out and enforce him leaving. When he is waiting for his turn patiently, then send pup to place and invite your older dog over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention if pushiness is an issue, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If your older dog growls at pup, make him leave the room while also carefully disciplining pup similarly if pup antagonized him first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. When pup first enters the room, give your older dog a treat without pup seeing so pup is associated with good things for your older dog - treats stop when pup leaves. When your older dog is being calm, tolerant, and friendly without acting dominant and pushy toward pup, you can also calmly give a treat. Keep the energy calm when interacting with the dogs. Don't feel sorry for either dog but give clear boundaries instead. Don't expect them to be best friends right now - the goal is calm co-existence. When puppy matures and they have learned good manners around each other, they may decide to be friends as adults, but calmness, tolerance, and co-existence comes first. I would also consider desensitizing your older dog to wearing a basket muzzle using food rewards, gradually, so that you know pup an wear that when safety is an issue. Advocate for your older dog by enforcing the younger dog giving them space also. Don't allow pup to pester them. A solid Place, Leave It, and Out command is just as important for the puppy as it is for your older dog right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kirra
Australian Shepherd
2 Months
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Kirra
Australian Shepherd
2 Months

She’s very boisterous and pesters our yorkie (3 years old) constantly. The yorkie seems scared and runs away growling, sometimes he turns around and bites at the puppy. Kirra (the puppy) just keeps trying to play.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jennifer, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I also recommend teaching Leave It. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make him leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let her see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by the puppy and because of his age it’s harder for him to handle her and keep up with her energy. He needs to feel like you are the one managing her, protecting him from her pestering him, and making her appearance pleasant for him. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then he may adjust to her presence as she grows, especially when she calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailey
Beagle
11 Years
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Question
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Bailey
Beagle
11 Years

My sister in law is staying with my family while her husband is away. She has a 6 month old puppy(Dachshund mix named Nino) who constantly wants to play. Bailey is not a very play oriented dog. How do we know when play and roughhousing become too aggressive and should interve? I don't know how to tell if she's playing or trying to get him to leave her alone.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
837 Dog owners recommended

Hello Allison, First, look for a play bow. A play bow should come right before any play fighting. Play bow pictures: https://www.companionanimalpsychology.com/2017/02/the-function-of-play-bows-in-dog-and.html Second, pay attention to overall body language. Do both dogs look happy and relaxed - they may tense up for a few seconds in concentration or play but you should see doggie grins, relaxed shoulders, loose tail, lifted or relaxed ears. Neither dog should look really tense or small or towering or have really flattened ears or tucked tail. A really tense or puffed up dog might be bullying another, and a tucked, tense or overly submissive looking dog may be fearful. Both dogs may look a bit submissive or confident, but it should seem happy and relaxed, with lots of movement, doggie grin, or play bows. Third, often dogs will start with play and things will get tense when one dog wants to quite or slow down and the other won't listen. If you suspect things are getting too rough for one dog (one keeps trying to walk away and the other won't let them, one is constantly pinned on the ground without taking turns being the one to pin, or is being chased without ever being the chaser back), then interrupt play, have pups do a couple commands to earn treats - to make this interruption something pup's learn to listen to willingly, then allow the dog who may need a break go free first. See if they reinitiate play with the other pup. If they do, you can let them play more. If not, they are done for now. Facilitate pup leaving them alone for a while. I would also highly recommend teaching the puppy commands like Leave It and Out, and crate training. Help pup learn to give the older dog a break, and generally let the older dog be the one to initiate play first, and not be pestered into playing by the puppy. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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