How to Train a Yorkshire Terrier to Not Bark

Medium
4-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

Yorkshire Terriers are little dogs with huge personalities. With those huge personalities come a fierce territorial bark. Any time your phone rings, someone speaks or knocks on your door, or your doorbell chimes, your Yorkshire Terrier will likely bark. Outside noises aren’t even required for barking for some Yorkies.

When your Yorkie barks at you he is trying to communicate something. Many times dogs vocalize a potential danger or their fears. When your little guy barks, it might simply be because compared to the world and the wealth of noises around him, he is tiny. But he also wants to make sure you are safe as well. Training him not to bark will start by making him feel safe when he hears common noises and other times he typically barks. 

Defining Tasks

Helping your Yorkshire Terrier feel secure is key in training him to stop barking. When he feels secure and understands common noises he may hear, such as the phone or the doorbell ringing, don't always require incessant barking, he won't bark as much as he does now. At first, you will need to pay attention to when your Yorkshire Terrier barks, and then teach him a command so he understands when it’s time to stop barking. Repetition and rewards will be key as you teach him to stop barking or to not bark during certain occasions. Give this lots of time as your dog mixes his safety and security with natural instincts to bark and the redirection you are training him. This is a training opportunity that will work really well for a puppy but will be more difficult for an adult Yorkshire terrier who has spent much of his life barking whenever he wishes.

Getting Started

Plan on replicating events when your Yorkie barks most often such as a knock at the door. If you have clicker trained your Terrier in the past, have your clicker and treats handy for opportunities when he barks and needs redirection. Even without clicker training, be sure always to have lots of tasty treats to reward as he learns new behaviors. Training your Yorkshire Terrier not to bark will become more about catching him in the act and redirecting his behavior, so you don’t necessarily need scheduled training times.

The Security Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Build scenario
Create random situations that might make your Yorkie bark.
Step
2
Build security
Your dog might be barking because he feels it is his job to protect you and the home. He also might be frightened himself and will bark to alert you of a security concern.
Step
3
Barking
When he starts barking, pick him up and assure him with a soft voice he is okay. Pet him and snuggle with him. This may not stop the barking, but calm him and make him feel secure.
Step
4
Command
Teach your dog a 'quiet' command. Anytime you hold him, ask him to be quiet. As he calms, he will automatically quieten.
Step
5
Quiet
As you continue to say this command to be quiet and he settles down, give him a treat as a reward. Anytime he barks, build his confidence and security, ask him to quiet, and give him a treat once he’s stopped barking. With time, he will learn to stop barking by the command you use or when you hold him.
Recommend training method?

The 'Quiet' Command Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Set your limits
Decide when it’s okay for your Yorkshire Terrier to bark and for how long you will allow him to bark. For instance, if the doorbell rings or he hears a noise and you would like him to bark to let you know something is happening but you don’t want him to bark incessantly, set your limit for expectations of time he’s allowed to bark or number barks before you use the command to quiet him.
Step
2
Bark
Do something to get your Yorkie to bark. Knock on something or have someone ring your doorbell or make a noise that word incite him to bark.
Step
3
At limit
Dogs are very good at understanding time and routine. This is why he sits in the window or at the door when it’s time for you to come home or why he always goes to his bowl at the same time every day. He understands things happen at this time. Once he has reached the barking limit, and that needs to be the same each time, say he gets 10 seconds of barking or four barks, give him a command to quiet.
Step
4
Redirect
Because he will not be familiar with this command, you'll need to get his attention and entice him to be quiet. Stand in front of him and hold the treat. This will typically calm and quiet a Yorkie down.
Step
5
Treat
Say the command ‘quiet’ again and give him the treat.
Step
6
Practice
Practice this with your Yorkie several times. Any time he barks, wait until he reaches the limit you have set, then give him the command, redirect his actions, and reward him. With lots of practice, your Yorkshire Terrier should recognize the 'quiet' command as a command to stop barking. Some Yorkies will even stop barking once they've hit their number of barks or time limit because it's become habit.
Recommend training method?

The Redirect Time Out Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Set up
Set up an area for redirection. This can be a bed or a mat your Yorkie will be expected to go to in the event he needs to stop barking. Set up a situation that would normally cause your Yorkshire Terrier to bark. Make this action happen, such as a loud noise or the ringing of your doorbell to get your dog excited.
Step
2
Noise
Make some noise that will get your dog to bark. As soon as your little guy starts barking, immediately redirect him. Point to his bed or mat and tell him to go there. He may be running to the front door if the doorbell rang, barking the whole way. In this instance, pick him up and put him on the mat.
Step
3
Encourage
Encourage your Yorkie to stay on the mat by giving him a treat or a chew treat or toy.
Step
4
Stay
If you have not taught the ‘stay’ command, be sure to do so with your Yorkie. Ask him to stay while you handle whatever the noise was, such as a visitor at the door.
Step
5
Give command
Give a command like ‘no barking.’
Step
6
Challenge
Continue to work with your Yorkie challenging him to go to his mat or bed as a redirection anytime he starts to bark.
Step
7
Reward
Always reward him for making good choices.
Step
8
Practice
Anytime your dog barks, redirect him with his time out spot like his bed, ask him to stay, and give the 'no barking' command. With a distraction like a treat or toy, he will begin to associate the words ‘no barking’ with being quiet in his bed or on his mat
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Tinkerbell
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years
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Tinkerbell
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years

Whenever I take her for a walk she barks constantly at everything and everyone its really challenging to take her out .

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Rocky
Yorkie
6 Years
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Rocky
Yorkie
6 Years

My husband doesn’t like it when I leave my dog inside because he isn’t potty trained and sometimes he has accidents. The problem is that whenever we put him outside he won’t stop barking to come inside and it drives us nuts and we always think about giving him away but he’s our kids dog and we don’t want to crush their hearts. We are very stuck and we tried potty training him but we also think he is allergic to fleas because he bites at his skin all the time and he smells so bad everytime we bring him inside. Please help us, we would appreciate it so much!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Grace, You have a couple of options here. The first is to potty training him using the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside The second option - and the one that sounds most realistic in your situation, is to set up an exercise pen, place a disposable grass pad on one end and a Primopad on the opposite end. Also, give your dog something to do, like a couple of favorite chew toys - such as a food-stuffed Kong, or a treat dispensing device - such as an AutoTrainer, Pet Tutor, Kong wobble, or puzzle toy. I suggest a Primopad from Primopads.com because they are not absorbent so shouldn't encourage him to pee on it like a soft bed or towel would but will still give him a place to rest with a little cushioning. They are also easy to clean so you can keep odors down. I suggest a disposable grass pad because that will encourage peeing on grass and not encourage peeing on carpets like a pee pad could. You could also train him to use a litter box but the grass pad will likely be easiest. To teach Rocky to use the grass pad, check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Exercise Pen" method. The article talks about litter box training but you can use the same steps with the grass pad. Simply substitute a grass pad for the litter box. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable grass pad option: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16186452506555784925&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=pla-568582223506&psc=1 More expensive, nicer option: http://www.porchpotty.com/Default.asp?gclid=Cj0KCQiAr93gBRDSARIsADvHiOqp-lRKnIf0HKsZlJIXmTtvDGiGRQ0O6FTABU7K1cL7tDWLNA5ph9AaAsEsEALw_wcB For the barking I suggest using a high-quality bark collar or Pet Convincer - which is a small canister of pressurized air. Only pick the Pet Convincer if you will use it consistently though and the barking is primarily happening when you are home - otherwise a bark collar is in order. A bark collar may sound harsh, but if you teach him the "Quiet" command before you start using one and reward him with treats when he does not bark for attention (teaching him that being quiet is the way to get your attention), then it is a much better alternative than getting rid of him. Check out the article I have linked below and follow the "Quiet" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once he understands what "Quiet means, then when you put him outside or into the exercise pen, tell him "Quiet". If he stays quiet for a couple of minutes, return to him and sprinkle a couple of treats by his feet, then leave again. If he barks, tell him "Ah Ah" - the collar will correct him at the same time, but that way you are also teaching him to respond to your voice. The key is to tell him what he should do first (ie. Be quiet), to reward him when he does it, and for him to be consistently corrected for the barking. If you use a pet Convincer, you will have to go to him when he barks, tell him "Ah Ah" and spray a small puff of air at his side (NOT his face). Do NOT use a citronella collar. They seem gentler but they can actually be very harmful because the smell lingers with a dog for a long time - continuing to correct them for an hour or more sometimes, and dog's noses are VERY sensitive. An unscented air collar is fine but they tend to be less effective than bark collars. Look at the weigh ratings and reviews on bark collars. You will want one that says it can be used for dogs that weigh as little as your dog. https://www.petsmart.com/dog/training-and-behavior/bark-control/petsafe-elite-little-dog-bark-control-5163049.html I suggest asking your vet about the biting and licking. It might be a flea allergy since that is common - in which case I recommend using an exercise pen indoors even more so. You might want to ask your vet about a flea prevention that also repels fleas to decrease bites. If the issue continues after moving him inside, food allergies or a allergy to something else in his environment should be investigated. Food allergies are less common than flea allergies but still common in pets. Also, since there is a smell, he should probably be checked for sores and skin infections - that can cause strong odors in addition to the saliva. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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MoJo
Yorkie Terrier poodle mix
7 Years
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MoJo
Yorkie Terrier poodle mix
7 Years

Mojo has terrible issues with calming down especially when there are visitors or any type of noise. In addition, I cannot stop him from urinating everywhere at any time. I am working with the redirection and calming methods and it is making some impact. I fear however, with his age and the length of time he has been exhibiting this behavior, it is too late to perfect the training with the barking.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Janice, I suggest teaching a "Quiet" command by follow the "Quiet" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once Mojo understands what "Quiet" means, work on his general self-control and ability to calm himself by adding a lot more structure to his life, including teaching him the "Place" command and teaching him manners in the crate. Dogs with anxiety tend to benefit from a lot of structure and boundaries. In his case, I suggest not comforting him when he is barking. Instead, tell him "Quiet" and redirect him or correct him for the barking. Since he will know the "Quiet" command, the correction is for disobedience and is clear. Next, give him something else to do like go to "Place" and stay there with a chew toy. He needs opportunities to learn how to handle his own emotions and calm down. He needs firmness, calmness, and guidance from you. He should not be too old to learn but it will take work. Check out the video below for general guidelines for calmness How to teach Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo How to teach Crate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 If there is something specific that he is barking at, you can also spend time desensitizing him to that specific thing. If the barking is general and everything, teach him "Quiet", correct disobedience when he keeps barking after being told quiet, and give him another job to do like stay on Place or stay in the crate with the door open. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Samson
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year
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Samson
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year

Hi, i have an issue, my dog barks at everything. He even wil bark at my husband or me if were walking out of our bedrooms randomly(my yorkie stays in the kitchen area in his playpen where he's secure) he doesnt bark at my childern though. My husband could be talking back in our bedroom on the phone and my yorkie will bark at that. What do you think this could mean ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Talesha, Barking is a self-rewarding behavior because of the chemicals released in a dog's brain when they get aroused while barking. Barking can be a sign of fear- like if pup shows other signs of fear around you and your husband in general. It can be to get attention, or it can simply be a habit that was formed at some point and continues because pup finds it satisfying. Most of the time dogs who bark at everything have become overly sensitive to things and have formed a habit of reacting. I suggest combining a few things in your case. First, you need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - which will be a form of correction - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one example. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Intentionally practice creating scenarios and noises that typically trigger the barking and rewarding pup before he barks and when he stops barking. You want to do this so often, that something like the phone ringing or the door being knocked on has become boring to pup and they have developed a habit of being quiet around those noises and just ignoring them. Right now pup is expecting something exciting, scary, or new to happen when certain things happen - make those events - like a door knock or person entering a room, completely boring by doing it over and over and over again during training scenarios - rewarding the correct response. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Beau
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year
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Beau
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year

She very stubborn but after a couple of attempts she get the hang of it and very impatient if she do get it straight away she will bark she bark when she don’t get the treat if she been waiting for a long time but I don’t give it to her if she hasn’t done what I have commanded to do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Frankie, At this point in training, the barking is normal. Many dogs will try barking during the learning process at a certain point. She is trying different things to figure out how to get the food. When she barks, put the treat behind your back, slow down the training process - breaking it into smaller steps, and wait a few seconds after giving a command before showing her what to do - to let her "guess" the right thing. Keep training sessions shorter but frequent, so that she has lots of opportunities to improve but gets less overwhelmed with long sessions - when a dog starts getting overwhelmed mentally, then tend to guess more instead of listen and generally loose focus, which makes it more frustrating and harder to teach for the person training also. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ronnie
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Years
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Ronnie
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Years

I adopted Ronnie and his friend, for the first two months of walking Ronnie he would only ever bark at other dogs. I went away for a month due to a parents death while my husband stayed behind. Ronnie over that month would on and off bark while walking for no reason. Now I’m home it’s almost the whole walk. He cries paces back and forth and barks. He acts terrified. We walk together. We have picked him up until he is calm. We tried treats, nothing works. This behaviour only happens during the walk! We tried walking separately and still the behaviour continues. The other dog is calm and happy. We end of carrying Ronnie so much he is missing out on exercise.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kayleigh, This is a behavior I would hire a private trainer to help with in person, because the training will need to be adjusted some in real time based on how pup is responding and pup's body language and responses need to be evaluated also. Since in person training may not be an option due to shut downs, working with a trainer over phone and Skype with videos of pup's reactions being submitted to the trainer for evaluation, and a Q and A session for the trainer to ask more about pup's behavior could significantly help still, if you work with the right trainer, who has experience in this area. You need someone who can evaluate whether pup is afraid of something in their environment that they need to be desensitizes. Whether they are just in the habit of being highly aroused and need that interrupted with something like an unscented Pet Convincer, or whether they are being rewarded somehow for their behavior - perhaps they want to be picked up and its an attention seeking behavior. Once it's known what's going on, then a method for addressing the behavior and what's causing it can be created and followed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Cooper
Yorkie
9 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Cooper
Yorkie
9 Months

My dog barks like crazy when we go for a walk. He barks at anything that moves. Especially other dogs. What can I do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patricia, First, for the barking, I suggest combining a few things in your case. You need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - which will be a form of punishment - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one type of interrupter. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing him a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever he DOESN'T bark around something that he normally would have, calmly praise and reward him to continue the desensitization process. Finally, work on pup's heel. You want pup to learn to heel slightly behind your leg so that he is in a following state during the walk, and not scanning the horizon for things to bark at. Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Simon
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Months
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Simon
Yorkshire Terrier
8 Months

Very sweet dog at home & with people that come inside our house. Does not bark at the door. BUT when we our outdoors there is nothing that can keep him calm, and he does not receive any type of treat or toy if he’s outside. Can not see an animal or person outdoors.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, First, for the barking, I suggest combining a few things in your case. You need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one example of an interrupter. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing him a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever he DOESN'T bark around something that he normally would have, calmly praise and reward him to continue the desensitization process. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Murphy
Yorkie
1 Year
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Murphy
Yorkie
1 Year

My pup is pad trained... mostly. Often he 'misses' the mat. He only goes where there is a mat (sometimes a rug), but it's only about 25% on the mat and 75% on the tile next to the mat... can you help? I am not sure how to fix it. I would love him to stick to the mat (not miss) and quit confusing floor rugs (inside and outside) with the pee pad.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
86 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Without the ability to ask follow up questions, I hope I do not give you information you already know, or have tried. Sometimes dogs move around a bit when they eliminate. I am wondering if that is what is going on with him. Is it possible for you to put down two pads next to eachother to see if that helps solve this problem. Some dogs simply need more space to go comfortably. I am also going to give you a crash course on pad training just in case there are any tips that you find beneficial. Sometimes starting over and refreshing them with training makes a world of difference. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Mily
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Months
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Mily
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Months

to teach my dog to stop barking if I say quiet .

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
86 Dog owners recommended

Hi! There are quite a few steps to teach "Quiet" so I am pasting a link for you to follow. Thanks for writing in! https://wagwalking.com/training/be-quiet

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Penny
Yorkie
3 Years
0 found helpful
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Penny
Yorkie
3 Years

Barks at everyone and everything. We can calm her down when we are home but she Barks all the time when we are not. Neighbours complain

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Yorkies love to vocalize, that is certain. In fact, many dogs do. Is this a new behavior? Has something changed in the house that has brought on the barking? There are excellent tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bark-when-left-alone. I would try the Set Up Right Method. Before you go out, prepare a Kong toy stuffed with kibble and a smear of dog safe peanut butter (no xylitol as it is toxic!). Give it to Penny before you leave. Does she have an area she likes to go to be safe and cozy? Dogs will often bark if they are left in a big house or apartment. Make her an exercise pen area, with a new cozy bed, her stuffed kong and other new toys, and a background noise like a fan (not directed at her) or a radio. Take a look here:https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Leave the house for 5 minutes with her in her pen, extending the time by 5 to 10 minutes per day to acclimatize her to being alone. Dog appeasing pheromones may calm her; they are emitted via diffuser and can be bought at pet supply stores. I hope these tips help. Good luck!

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