How to Train an Australian Shepherd to Not Bark

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

You may have noticed that dogs, like humans, like to talk. The big difference is that they talk by barking. If your Australian Shepherd barks seemingly incessantly, it is far too easy to dismiss it as your pooch is simply barking to hear his own voice. Your pup might actually be barking as a form of manipulation, in that he knows that the more he barks, the more likely you are to give in and give him what he wants.

Doing this would be a terrible mistake. Once you start down this road, your dog will bark even more to get the things he wants. There are, of course, times when your dog might be barking for a good reason, such as to warn you of something, when he is really anxious, when you are playing, or when he is simply bored. It is important for you to realize the difference and only work to discourage your pooch from barking when there is no reason for him to make any noise at all.

Defining Tasks

No one wants a dog that barks constantly. Not only is annoying for you, but you can bet your pup is annoying virtually all of your neighbors. The concept is to train your dog that, while there may be times when it is okay for him to bark, the vast majority of the time he needs to hold his tongue and give everyone a little peace and quiet.

Keep in mind the average Australian Shepherd tends to bark a lot, making it a little more challenging to get him to stop barking unless you give him the 'speak' command or there is a situation in which he needs to bark to alert you. 

Getting Started

Since you are working on more advanced training, before you get started, be sure your pup has mastered the four basic commands, 'come', 'sit', 'stay', and 'down'. Teaching your pup these first helps to establish your position as the alpha in the pack. Remember, your dog sees his human family as his pack and he needs to know his place in the pack from the outset. The only supplies you need is a big bag of your pup's favorite treats, plenty of time, and an abundant supply of patience. 

The Caught You Method

Effective
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Step
1
You need treats
You need to start out each training session with a pocketful of your pup's favorite treats. You will be using them to reward your pooch when he gets things right.
Step
2
Is that you I hear?
The next time your pooch decides to go off on a barking fit, just let him go to town. However, you do need to keep a close eye on him.
Step
3
When he stops
At some point in time, your pup is going to get tired of hearing himself bark. You need to be there when he does with plenty of praise and a treat. Repeat this process over the next few days, helping your pup to associate the fact he stopped barking with getting a treat.
Step
4
Be quiet
Now is a great time to introduce your cue word, "Quiet" to your pooch. Start by letting him start barking, then when stops barking, say "Quiet" in a firm commanding voice and give him plenty of praise and a treat or two. Repeat until he associates the cue "Quiet" with stopping the noise and getting a treat.
Step
5
Time is on your side
To firmly affix this behavior in his mind, continue with the training and start adding more time between when he stops and when you give him the treat. It will take a little time, but the peace and quiet will be more than worth the work.
Recommend training method?

The Tell Me About It Method

Effective
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Step
1
On the leash again
Clip your pooch's leash on, it will help you maintain control during the training sessions.
Step
2
Tell me all about it then
This method assumes you've already taught your dog to bark on command. Give your pup the 'speak' command and let him start to bark. But, when he does, be sure to give him the 'quiet' command right away. Be sure to use a firm, commanding voice.
Step
3
Wait for it
Wait for your pup to stop barking on his own. When he does, be sure to give him a treat and plenty of praise. Practice this for a few days.
Step
4
More time, please
Now that your pup knows he is going to get a treat when he stops barking, you need to take advantage of this and start extending the time between when he stops and when you give him a treat.
Step
5
The final step
The final step in this training is simply to keep working with your pup until he no longer barks unless you give him permission, or he deems the situation is dire enough that he needs to alert you.
Recommend training method?

The Show Him Your Back Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Treats first
Before you start training your pup, you need to fill at least one pocket with some of your pup's favorite treats.
Step
2
On the spot
Chances are good there are certain areas of the house or yard that tend to set your pup off barking incessantly. Take him to one of those spots and then spend a little time with him.
Step
3
Hello, is that you?
Each time your pup decides to go off on a barking tangent, simply turn your back to him and completely ignore the noise.
Step
4
Silence is golden
At some point your pup will stop barking, and when he does, be right there with plenty of praise and a treat or two.
Step
5
Press repeat
The rest is all about repeating the training and slowly adding more time to how long he must wait for his treat. In time, your pup will learn when he can and when he cannot get away with barking.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Cooper
Australian Shepherd
8 Weeks
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Question
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Cooper
Australian Shepherd
8 Weeks

We recently got our 8 week old Aussie, Cooper and are loving the addition to our family. He has been good about knowing going to the bathroom outside (with a few small accidents here and there inside), but the main thing that we have noticed in our short time having him (5 days now) is that his barking gets very excessive when he is in his crate during the day and at night as well. He has also tried digging and biting at the cage to get out. My fiance and I both work full time and are trying to crate train him the right way while working full time so we have been limiting the time he is consecutively in the crate. My fiance gets up at 5:00 and lets him out and plays with him as she is getting ready and when she leaves at 6:15, I get up and play with him and take him out and feed him before I leave around 7:20. We have been having someone come around 10:30 and staying until 11:30 to let him out and play with him and then I have been coming home around 11:45 and staying till around 12:45. After I leave he is in his crate until 3:30 roughly when my fiance gets home. Really we just want to make sure we are doing the right things from the get go and do not want him developing anxiety or stress from being in his crate since it should be a place of comfort.

What are the things we should do to control his barking and comfort level while he is home alone inside the crate?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ryan, Honestly, the main thing is to not let him out while he is crying unless he truly needs to go potty. The hardest part about crate training is being consistent and firm. Puppies need to opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain. If you let them out when they cry, then actually learn that crying is how they get free - which is the opposite of the goal and increases separation anxiety risks....You are likely not doing any of that from the sound of it, and staying consistent, but that's my biggest piece of advice. Know that it's normal for puppies to pitch a fit in the crate for the first 2 weeks - stay consistent. When you are home, practice the Surprise method from the article linked below for an hour each day - that will mean extra crate time for him but that's not a bad thing at this age right now as long as that time is proactive learning - letting him practice crying it out, then being rewarded when he gets quiet so he can make that connection. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Work on establishing some boundaries around the crate to encourage calmness: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Give a dog-food stuffed chew toy, like a Kong so he has something to do while you are away - you can place his food in a bowl, cover it with water, let it sit out until it turns to mush, mix a little peanut butter or liver paste into it, stick a straw through the Kong, loosely stuff the food around the straw in the Kong, freeze the whole thing overnight, take the straw out the next morning and give him the Kong as part of his breakfast portion in the crate. He can actually eat all of his meals as stuffed Kongs and used as treats and not need a food bowl at this age if you want. The straw creates a hole that prevents suction during licking. You can also make several kongs ahead of time and just grab from freezer as needed to save on time. If the barking continues past one month, you can use a soft small towel rolled up with rubberbands to hold it in place, and give the crate a little bump while saying "Ah Ah" when he cries, then practice the Surprise method to teach quietness. Most puppies will adjust without the correction though - the corrections interrupt an anxious state of mind to give enough of an opportunity for pup to get quiet so you can teach quietness if they aren't learning it another way. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Kratos
Australian Shepard
14 Weeks
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Kratos
Australian Shepard
14 Weeks

He bites alot and breaks the skin. I have a 2 1/2 year old grandson that lives with me, i need the puppy not to nip or knock grandson down. Help me please

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Debra, Check out the "Leave It" method from the article linked below. Once he knows leave it, use that command to tell him not to bite when he tries to or is thinking about it. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the jumping, check out the "Step Toward" method from the article linked below. You can get in front of your grandson and step toward the puppy for him when Kratos tries to jump on him, then reward him if he sits for your grandson instead. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Oliver
Toy Australian Shepherd
7 Months
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Oliver
Toy Australian Shepherd
7 Months

Oliver barks at anything that moves! At home I am able to distract him with using "Quiet" and a treat. However while walking him with our Golden Doodle, he barks and cries at people we pass, dogs, birds, and especially cars!! I try to let him stop and use Quiet but he doesn't stop until the movement is out of sight. Very upsetting to anyone around and to our other dog. Any advice would be appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mary, The first step is to interrupt his anxious/arousef state of mind. Check out the video linked below: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/good-dog-transformations/how-we-work-through-leash-reactivity-with-the-wild-and-crazy-ozzie-2nd-session/ Check out the videos and articles linked below for ways to build impulse control, respect, and trust; Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Once he is calmer on a walk it is very important to also focus a ton on socializing him around the things he is barking at. Socialization should be calm and positive, with strangers doing things like tossing him treats for sitting and being calm, rewards for doing down stays near other dogs, calm praise for heeling around other distractions, ect...You want him to get super comfortable with new things and not fearful, and so familiar with them that they become boring - this should be done in a way that incorporates structure and calmness and not super exciting crazy things. Another video on interrupting arousal (in the video's case aggression, but your pup's may simply be rude behavior or over-excitement): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ For your pup it is really important not to skip the positive socialization and structure after corrections have decreased the unwanted behavior enough to start rewarding calmness instead - for the training to work long-term. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Daisy
Miniature Australian Shepherd
3 Years
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Daisy
Miniature Australian Shepherd
3 Years

We have a very smart mini Aussie that we rescued at one year of age. She has bitten (not breaking skin, but still very painful)our four year old grandson twice. Once when he was just walking by her. We don’t know what to do, to change this behavior. My grandson loves dogs, has grown up around them. He has never hurt Daisy. Currently, when he and his baby sister (2 years old) come over, Daisy has to go to her kennel for their entire visit. I have also bought her a muzzle, which I’ve slowly been trying to get her used to. Daisy is part of our family and I hate having to do these things, but I must make sure that my babies are safe. Daisy is very treat and ball motivated. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jackie, First, using measures like crating and desensitizing her to the muzzle are important first steps - the kids are first priority and need to be kept safe, and being allowed to act aggressive toward them will make the behavior in her worse, so don't feel bad about doing those things. Those are responsible first steps. Check out the videos linked below on desensitizing aggressive dogs to kids. Notice the safety measures always taken though and be sure to implement similar measures - crates, back tie leash, lines for the kids not to cross, constant adult supervision anytime there is an interaction between the kids and dog, and a basket muzzle. You can work on teaching pup to respect the kids and be more comfortable around them via desensitizing and their respect for you and your rules. Once pup is doing well, I still would not allow her to be around the kids without a lot of structure and precautions in case since pup does have a history of biting - but training needs to be in place so that bites are no longer the norm. Just know that even when pup does well, they shouldn't be completely trusted still since they have shown a lack of impulse control around kids and could bite. Explanation of why dogs often bite kids (the dog in this video who is closer to the kids doesn't have aggression issues - which is why you don't see the extra precautions taken, like in the rest of the videos I have linked - extra safety measures will be needed when practicing with a known biter - such as a muzzle, back tie leash, crate, and greater distance between pup and kid): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7_0ZqiJ1zE&t=122s Use of crate, Place and tether leash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n0_27XY3z4 The dog is attached to the pole with a secure leash while on Place - notice the tape on the ground the kid knows not to cross - to keep the kid out of the dog's reach in case the dog lunges: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gblDgIkyAKU Teaching dog to move away from kids when uncomfortable: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYs76puesAE Later stage, up close desensitization - even though kids are close, there is still a line and pup is still on a back-tie leash so that pup can't actually get to kids to bite if they tried...This is a later stage exercise for pup once they can do well with the other above scenarios: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Peach
Australian Shepherd
10 Months
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Question
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Peach
Australian Shepherd
10 Months

Hi!
I have a 10 month old Aussie that I've had since she was 10 weeks old. She's sweet and fun-loving, but for the past couple of months she has been getting worse and worse with barking at any stranger that comes to the door, or any person she sees outside on the street when she's riding with me in the car. She's not a biter, but her bark is very loud and deep, so I know she scares others!
How do I go about getting her to bark at everything?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tiffany, If you are social distancing and having less exposure to people and more delivery people coming to your door, so may have become overly sensitive to the arrival of those people, then when she barks and the person leaves, in her mind the barking was effective so she is on high alert for that next time - creating a vicious cycle of being overly sensitive to seeing people. In that case, you want to remove the excitement out of seeing people and make their appearance boring and calm again. Check out the videos linked below and recruit some friends or family members to pretend to be delivery people and people in a parking lot (or driveway while you are in the car even - practice this while the car is still for safety reasons unless you have another person who can drive while you are training). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Desensitize and Quiet methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Practice someone at the door and all the things that are involved with someone approaching the door or car, over and over again, until pup starts getting bored and less reactive with the exercise. Only reward pup when they are responding well right that second - which will often involve rewarding pup before they react poorly, during seconds between barking - when they pause, and after you have repeated this so often that they are bored so calmer. Being rewarded for the calmness should help pup learn to offer that calm response more, but practicing this over and over should also help pup to feel more bored with people approaching the house and to associate that with something pleasant - being calm and treats, so pup feels more relaxed too about people. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Australian Shepherd
6 Months
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Question
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Daisy
Australian Shepherd
6 Months

She gets overly excited around other dogs and screams at the top of her lungs. When I try and get her to be quiet she wont. Is there a good way to get her to not scream?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angelica, Check out the Quiet method and the Desensitization method from the article linked below. The main thing that's probably needed is for pup to learn calmness around other dogs - since that's why they are screaming. Desensitizing pup to other dogs can help with that. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Check out the Passing Approach and Walking Together methods from the article linked below. Practice those methods, starting with the Passing Approach with the other dog on the sidewalk across the street. Recruit friends with well mannered dogs to help you. Only reward pup for good responses, calmness, or focusing on you. At first, pup will probably be super excited, as you pass the same dog over and over again and pup gets tired from the physical and mental work of heeling up and down the street, pup will likely calm down slowly - eventually giving you a chance to reward and them to learn how to be around another dog with less excitement. Expect to need to practice this often with various other dogs from friends. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
1 Year
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Question
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Daisy
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
1 Year

Daisy tends to bark a lot. She has always been a talker but more recently it’s been getting crazy. She barks when it’s time for bed. Barks when people walk by. Or will just bark at me. How do I stop the barking?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carley, Check out the barking article and video series linked below. The video series has specific videos addressing different types of barking, and how to desensitize to each other those things. I recommend following the Quiet method and the Desensitization method from the article. Quiet and Desensitization methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking video series - make a list of the things that commonly trigger pup's barking, even if that list is long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Auggie
Australian Shepherd
1 Year
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Auggie
Australian Shepherd
1 Year

When Auggie is calm, he will listen (sit, stay and not jump) but during the day, when he is outside, he barks constantly. And when we bring him back in, he just jumps on you. He is very spazzy and will jump/nip you because of his excitement. Should I try a beep collar? I have heard they work well. (not the laser one)

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Grace, A tone (beep) collar can be used for the barking but only if you teach the Quiet command, work on Quiet while with pup, then teach pup that the beep tone also means quiet as a way to reinforce the lesson when you are not outside with pup. The beep by itself without the prior training isn't likely to work alone for long. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark The barking outside can also be due to boredom or pup being too sensitive to things in their environment. I also recommend giving pup something safe to do in the yard to keep them entertained, like a dog food stuffed chew toys if there isn't a threat of that attracting dangerous animals on your property, and desensitizing pup to noises and things they tend to bark at. Check out the article I have linked above. You can also find the desensitize method in that article for desensitizing pup to things in their environment they bark at. Check out the Step Toward method from the article linked below for the jumping. It's important to also reward pup for sitting. They will need something to put their energy into in place of jumping when excited. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Tucker
Mini Australian Shepard
8 Weeks
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Tucker
Mini Australian Shepard
8 Weeks

Our puppy won’t stop barking ,howling and whining around meal time. He gets breakfast around 7/7:30 and around 7 he starts howling and whining until he gets food. How can we stop this behavior? Also how can we get him to slow down his eating?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Harley, I recommend teaching pup the Quiet method, then work on feeding pup his kibble, one piece at a time as he practices being quiet. Gradually require him to be quiet for longer and longer before giving a piece, to work on him learning not just to get quiet after barking, but how to stay quiet to earn food. I also recommend feeding pup their food that's not being used as treats for the training, in a dog food stuffed chew toy at this age - that can help keep pup entertained, wear them out, encourage quietness since they can't chew and bark at the same time, and teach them to prefer to chew their own chew toys instead of your things. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Felix
Australian Retriever
4 Years
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Felix
Australian Retriever
4 Years

Felix is a very sweet and loving dog and isn’t at all aggressive, but when people come to the door or walk by on the street he tends to bark a lot and is scaring people. As soon as he gets say “hi” to the person, he calms down, so it seems to be mostly when he gets exited or scared. Sometimes we can get him to stop, but one of the biggest problems is that he can tell when we’re paying attention and will always take his chance.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. It sounds like he has some mild protective behavior going on. I am going to provide you with information on how to correct this behavior so it doesn't become a major issue later on. You won’t be able to solve your dog’s overprotective behavior in one day. In the meantime, you don’t want to put your life on hold. You can still invite guests into your home as long as you prioritize managing your dog’s behavior. You’ll need a short-term strategy to start showing your overprotective dog what behavior is unacceptable while also keeping your guests safe. There are a few ways to do this. Leash: Keeping your dog on a leash while friends are visiting gives you control over your dog’s actions. Leash him up before the doorbell rings and keep him close as you greet your guests. During the visit, you can let the leash drag and only use it if you have to. Muzzle: If you feel his behavior warrants the use of a muzzle for the time being while you work on solving this problem, then it may be a wise choice. Separate Room: Your dog won’t get better without practice, but sometimes you have to weigh the risks versus rewards. If your overprotective dog is in the beginning stages of training, keeping him separated from guests might be best. You don’t want to put a friend’s safety at risk or needlessly stress out your dog. As long as you keep working toward stopping the behavior, separating an overprotective dog from company is a temporary management solution. Start Obedience Training Obedience training is a must for every dog, and it’s especially important for overprotective dogs. Working with your dog on things like “sit-stay,” “down-stay,” and “heel,” will help build his impulse control. He’ll start seeing you as a capable leader and will turn to you for guidance. A mistake many pup parents make is stopping obedience training once their dog masters the basics skills. Being well-trained is about more than knowing how to sit when a person holds a treat in front of their face. It’s a lifetime lesson, and even senior dogs need regular training. Commit to training your dog several times a day for short periods of time. Make Your Dog Work for Affection You can’t help but smother your dog with love every time he’s within petting distance, but that isn’t always what’s best for him. He will start to feel entitled to your attention, and that’s part of the problem. To remedy this, initiate a “work for it” program that allows you to show your dog affection as long as he earns your attention in appropriate ways. Make him sit, stay calm, and do whatever else you ask before doling out whatever it is he wants. If he’s excited for dinner, make him sit and leave it before digging in. If he wants in your lap, ask him to do a trick first. Never give your dog attention if he rudely nudges your hand or barks in your face. He needs to know polite behavior, and polite behavior only, is how he gets what he wants. You ignore everything else. Involve Other People in the Dog’s Life Most overprotective dogs choose to guard only the person they feel closest to. It’s usually the same person who fills their food bowls, takes them on walks, and handles training. They become obsessively attached, and a strong bond gradually mutates into overprotective behavior. Putting some space between you and your dog will help him learn to trust other people. Enlist the entire family’s help and take a step back in your role as primary caregiver. Have someone else feed the dog a few times a week, and encourage other people to engage her in playtime. This will help him be more comfortable with different people. Socialize Socialization is best done during the puppy stages, but even adult and senior dogs benefit from new experiences. Exposing your overprotective dog to new places, experiences, and people, will help him learn that not everyone is out to hurt you. Make sure each new experience is positive, and encourage your dog without forcing him to interact. If your dog is afraid, you don’t want to make things worse. Take socialization at the pace he’s comfortable with. If he seems overwhelmed, back up and try something a little smaller. These are some general ideas and they can be modified to fit your dynamic. These behaviors do take time, I am talking months, to correct. And sometimes the behaviors get worse before they get better. So just push through that time if that starts to happen. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Sunny
Miniature Australian Shepherd
6 Months
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Sunny
Miniature Australian Shepherd
6 Months

My 6-month-old miniature Australian shepherd pulls so much on the leash that she chokes herself. We've tried using her collar, and two different no-pull harnesses but none of them tend to work. She just can't handle distractions. On walks, she's a nightmare because whenever she sees somebody, she lunges, growls, and barks. She has never bitten anyone but she looks like she could. She also can't come when called or stay with distractions. We go on a couple of hikes a week and on each of them, we try training her. She won't take treats or do any commands with distractions. She also barks at any stranger. Do you think she'll ever get better? How should we train her?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Australian Shepherds have a lot of energy and need daily exercise and mental stimulation. Good for you for lots of walks and hikes, too. I think that obedience classes are the answer now, before she gets worse. If you feel that Sunny is not ready for obedience classes and you need to train her a bit before, call in a trainer to give you some pointers in the home (one or two sessions does wonders). In the meantime, for walking, train her to heel. Starting with the Treat Lure Method may be ideal, and then work on the other two methods. She will hopefully learn to focus on you and not the distractions because she is in training mode, which Australian Shepherds typically love: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. As for seeing other dogs, try the Passing Approach Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs. (If she is staying aggressive with people/dogs after these methods, please call in a trainer who is knowledgeable on aggression). Good luck!

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Milo
Australian Shepherd
2 Months
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Milo
Australian Shepherd
2 Months

He barks when we stay stop how do we get him to stop barking?

He also biting us a lot how do we stop him from biting us, our clothes. We tried 2 bitter sprays

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Bodie
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
1 Year
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Question
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Bodie
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
1 Year

Recently my 1 year old aussie has decided that he likes to bark at people... not all the time. Usually only when we're sitting outside and one of our neighbors comes outside too or if someone walks by the house. Or if we do a curbside pick up order and the person walks up to the car. And it's a big loud scary I'm going to eat you bark. Which he would never do,h. If the person acknowledges him he turns into an excited wiggle butt. No matter what I try, I can't get his attention refocused. I try to give him a treat to distract him, but he continues to bark and growl why he eats. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the article and videos I have linked below. I recommend desensitizing pup to those types of encounters by recruiting friends who can pretend to be delivery people to help, and teaching the quiet command. With friends' help you can set up the scenario for the person to stay far enough away and calm enough at first for pup to respond to you better, then roll play it over and over and over again until pup is desensitized to that person and able to react more calmly - at which point you can then reward the calmness. Quiet and Desensitize methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking at the door, barking at strangers, and barking on a walk videos specifically from this list (all of the videos are generally good examples of how to desensitize though): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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