How to Train an Australian Shepherd to Not Bite

Medium
2-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

While it’s true that any dog can have issues with using their teeth at the wrong time, nipping and biting inappropriately can be double the issue when you have a herding breed. Herding dogs are often known for nipping at the ankles of their charges to get them moving. However, when your dog is running around with you in the backyard, it can be relatively annoying to have him constantly nipping at your heels.

Australian Shepherds, also known as Aussies, are a herding breed that can exhibit this behavior without the appropriate training. It can be frustrating, especially if your Aussie is prone to herding small children or other household pets. Nipping and biting may be something you’ll want to put a stop to entirely if it’s presenting a problem for you or your family.

Defining Tasks

Teaching any dog to not bite once they’ve formed the habit can be challenging, but it can be especially challenging for breeds who are responding to instinct. However, with the right formula, you can break a bad habit and replace it with much better ones. Biting habits of Australian shepherds should be interrupted as soon as you notice them develop, which is generally during late puppyhood, but even an adult Aussie can learn to put energy into more appropriate habits.

Getting rid of inappropriate biting can take anywhere between two to six weeks, depending on how long your dog has been exhibiting it. Consistent and daily intervention and training should make the process relatively pain-free but remember that instinct is a powerful force. You’ll have to be more appealing than the base desire to run, chase, and bite.

Getting Started

Constructive outlets for biting and mouthing are important, so looking into things like chew toys can be useful. You’ll also want a leash for control when outdoors and treats for rewarding positive behavior. Have these things on hand whenever you begin your training, so you can be certain that you have what you need to keep training on track.

The Leave It Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Use a treat as a lure
Have a treat in hand and ready to keep your dog’s interest. Allow him to sniff at it, but don’t allow him to have it.
Step
2
Reward for disinterest
As soon as your dog loses interest because of his inability to get the treat, reward him with verbal praise and the treat. He will need to know that he gets rewarded when he leaves something alone.
Step
3
Use the verbal command
Use the words ‘leave it’ whenever your dog begins to ignore or look away from the treat as you practice. Use these words every time.
Step
4
Make it challenging
Start placing the treat on the ground and use your verbal command to test your Aussie’s ability to leave it alone. Practice this trick often. Remember to always reward with both verbal praise and a treat when he behaves appropriately.
Step
5
Put it in context
Use the command when you’re out and about and your dog begins to exhibit his biting behavior. Reward him whenever he obeys and keeps his teeth to himself.
Recommend training method?

The Time and Place Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Keep small children at a distance
Having small children running around your dog can make him shift into herding mode. Make sure that you keep an eye on them and consider placing them in separate play areas.
Step
2
Encourage productive play
Use toys, flirt poles, or other fun objects to allow your Aussie to use his teeth without turning them towards your ankles instead.
Step
3
Provide an alternative outlet
Offer plenty of exercise during the day if your dog does not actually herd any livestock. Going for walks, participating in sports, or going swimming can all help tire him out and make him less prone to running after you.
Step
4
Avoid provoking a chase
Avoid running around your Aussie, as that may encourage him to chase you and nip at you.
Step
5
Use a leash
Keep your dog on a leash during outdoor activities to control the amount of running around that he does.
Recommend training method?

The Intervention Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Observe the triggers
Watch for what puts your Aussie into a herding mode. It may be someone running, someone walking by, small animals, or other such triggers.
Step
2
Use a long leash
Keep your dog on a long leash for maximum control while also allowing her the freedom to wander a bit.
Step
3
Set up a trigger
Have someone help you to set up a situation that might cause your to dog begin her herding and biting behavior.
Step
4
Interrupt with a command
Get her attention by using an obedience command that your Aussie already knows. You may need to call her name to get her attention first. Have a treat in hand so she can see it.
Step
5
Reward for obedience
If she stops her chasing or biting behavior and obeys your obedience command, reward her for doing so with a treat and verbal praise. If she does not respond, use a higher value treat such as real meats or something that your dog doesn’t get to have very often.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Mack and Zita
Australian Shepherd
16 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mack and Zita
Australian Shepherd
16 Months

I have male and female Aussies. Siblings. They are 16 months. More than once they have acted territorial when a person is in a yard. Someone that they already have met and seem fine with. They jump and nip at them. Because they are jumping they do not nip their heels though I think they are hearding the person to a different part of the yard. They bark a lot during these encounters and it terrifies the person. They have not bit but the nipping and jumping is scary and has left scratches from nails and The canine teeth. It has only happened when they are together And they are feeding off one another.
How do I break this behavior?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, my suggestion is to have a trainer come to the home. Consult someone who is used to dealing with aggression, biting, and jumping. Having the problem times two is a difficult situation. The fact that they are terrifying people, not to mention causing injury, calls for a professional in person. In the meantime, start reinforcing the commands they learned in puppy school. Practice and practice the Down, Off, Sit, Stay, and Recall commands. I would hesitate to let them greet people in the yard, in case you get a complaint - or even worse - someone gets hurt. In the meantime, you can try working with your dogs using the methods here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers. Consistency is key. Also here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. All the best!

Add a comment to Mack and Zita's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Hank
Aussie Siberian
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Hank
Aussie Siberian
2 Months

We have had our Aussie for 2 weeks and he won't stop biting. We have 4 kids ages 12 and under and he isnt eating his food. He will eat his treats. We use treats to teach him to sit and lay down. Is there something i can do to stop him from biting and also get him to eat his dog food?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Hank has the lineage of two very busy and energetic breeds. Make sure that he is getting a lot of exercise (runs, fetch, ball, long walks) to help expend the energy and divert the biting habit. It is not too early to start his obedience training as well. For the biting, there are suggestions here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-your-hands. Provide a diversion such as a tugging toy while at the same time, being sure to tell him no when he bites. He may be teething, too. Buy him lots of teething toys with different textures to chew on and soothe the gums. As for the food, there are a lot of good articles here: https://www.purina.com/articles/dog/feeding/why-wont-my-dog-eat-dry-dog-food. As well, try the Mealtime Routine Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-puppy-to-eat-dog-food. I would give fewer treats for now as well. If Hank continues to refuse to eat, take him to the vet for a checkup and to rule out a medical issue. (He could be sensitive to the food, too. The vet can recommmed a food.) Good luck!

Add a comment to Hank's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Oz
Aussiedoodle
6 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Oz
Aussiedoodle
6 Years

My dog is six and barks at anyone who is not a relative when they enter the door. He also occasionally tries to herd people out the door by nipping their legs. What can I do to make my dog more comfortable with other people in our home? We’re getting ready to move to an apartment and I want to train him for better behavior. He doesn’t do these things outside the home and often licks people after awhile.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kate, I suggest recruiting a bunch of friends and family members that your dog does not know to come over to your home, one or two people at a time. Check out the video linked below and have them practice feeding him treats while he is calm (do not reward while he is barking). Notice the use of a back tie leash to prevent him from getting too close to guests and nipping while practicing this. Kids: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Adults: https://youtu.be/mgmRRYK1Z6A Also, check out the article linked below for general ways to improve respect and trust - which can help herding breeds listen more in the presence of distractions (moving people they want to control). https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2016/09/08/the-ten-commandments-of-dog-training-and-ownership-do-2 Also, teach a solid Place command and practice having him stay on Place while people move around and enter and leave your home. This exercise not only keeps him from biting while he is on Place but it also builds his impulse control and teaches him to listen and focus on you in the presence of things he wants to herd and control. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Oz's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Lana
Australian Shepherd
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lana
Australian Shepherd
5 Years

Well,I am a kid and often Lana is getting into stuff and when she does she bites or chases us and then bites. Also often are other Australian Shepard archer is instigating Lana and they get into bad fights. We have been walking her lately and I have been (herding) her when we do but are problem is that she has an aggressive additute tordes us we have 3 kids including me and 2 parents. Please help us make her a sweet dog like are other one.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Berkeley, It sounds like Luna and your family would really benefit from hiring a trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression or at least joining a class to gain some initial obedience and management tools. A trainer can demonstrate what methods and exercises you could work on with her to improve things, so that you are not guessing and having to sift through all the information on training out there. It's great that you are doing research - that's where my interest in dog training began in middle school at first actually, but when dealing with aggressive tendencies an overall program to gain her respect safely is likely needed. Things like having her work for everything she gets in life by performing a command like Sit first. So telling her to "Sit" before you feed her, then simply waiting her out until she does before giving her food (assuming she knows Sit - if not, start by teaching her basic commands with lure-reward training). Having her "Down" before opening the door to take her outside, having her "Touch" or "Watch me" before petting her, ect...The goal here is to simply be more persistent than she is. You don't have to use force, you have to wait for her to "give in" and obey to get what she wants. Practicing a lot of obedience commands and having her work for everything she gets in life can be some less confrontational ways to build respect. Perhaps share this message with your parents and let them take the lead on training her for safety reasons, and your entire family can work together in the areas where it's safe to do so, so that her overall attitude is more respectful toward everyone since everyone is consistent with her. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Lana's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Maidu
Australian Shepherd
6 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Maidu
Australian Shepherd
6 Months

Hello,
We have had Maidu since he was 10 weeks. He bit my daughter in the face a few weeks ago. She is 16 not hard but it was purposeful not playful. He seems to adore her so it was startling, and seemed out of the blue.She was handing him his bone he had dropped on the ground, something she had done before. He seems to love people and a little shy at first but non aggressive with dogs, but not a fan of kids. He growled at a little boy who came running at him at the beach. We don't have little kids around us. All of our friends have grown kids. The first 10 weeks of his life he was handled by the owners little children daily. Really concerned. He gets 30 minutes of exercise in the morning fetch or frisbee until he has a really good pant going. Around 4:30 he gets the same plus a 1 hour walk, and attention the rest of the night. He jumps and nips us in the morning before he goes out to play and anytime we come home. Love him to pieces but I want to ensure I'm doing everything I can so that he is not a biter. How do you get a dog to not be afraid of little kids when you don't know any. I thought of a muzzle and taking him to the park where he could be touched by children and realize they are are not scary without risking any children being bit. Is that a bad idea? Please help. I'll do whatever it takes.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. My first thought is that when he bit your daughter, it was a misguided protection of his bone, as if he was not ready to give it up and thought it was being taken away. As Caitlin mentions, this is a great guide: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. I do not think that you should try Maidu at the park with kids you do know because you can never be sure of their reaction or attitude toward dogs - they could make the situation worse. If you see someone with children, you could observe them in action with dogs and then discuss the problem with the parents, and see if they agree to a meeting.Otherwise, I would speak with a trainer and see how they can help you. Socialization and a good handle of commands (your super smart pup will pick things up quickly and thrive on training) will help Maidu to obey and know his place with you. Being a herding breed by nature, the nipping will take time to remedy. Take a look at this: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-nip Good luck and enjoy training!

Add a comment to Maidu's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Sydney
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sydney
Australian Shepherd
2 Years

Sydney gets very skittish when a new person comes up to him while on leash. Nips at there hand if they try and pet him. We just recently got him from a family a few days ago. He is fine with dogs at the dog park and avoids people there. Is there a way to correct this quickly? He is very sweet towards myself and wife and 2 year old son

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sean, It sound like fear of strangers is the problem in general. When pup is on leash, they feel trapped so that leads to biting. The fact that pup chooses to avoid people when not on leash is better than them going up to someone aggressively. The underlying fear of strangers needs to be addressed and until then it will be your job to deter people from coming up to them while on leash - they aren't ready for that yet. Fear can also take time to overcome. Sometimes it's quick, but expect to spend some time and dedication on this. Recruit friends and family pup doesn't know to walk past them while on leash. Watch pup's body language and have the person stay far enough away that pup stays relaxed. As the person passes pup and pup is reacting well (don't reward while aggressive or acting fearful), then have the person toss several treats gently toward pup's paws and continue walking. Have lots of different people do this in lots of different place - without approaching pup after. You want pup to begin to associate the people with something fun happening and take the pressure of petting away at first before pup is ready for that part. As pup improves, have the people gradually decrease the distance between them and pup. Once pup can handle people walking right by and dropping treats, practice the protocol from the video linked below, keeping pup's leash short enough that if pup were to lunge while practicing this, they won't be able to get to someone to bite. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Finally, during all of this, practice desensitizing pup to handling and touch using their food. As often as you can, feed pup their meals one piece at a time. Gently touch pup in an area while feeding a piece of food. Touch their should - feed a piece. Touch their back - feed a piece. Touch an ear - feed a piece. Touch their collar - feed a piece. Touch their paw - feed a piece. Touch their belly - feed a piece. ect... Do it gently and start with areas pup is most comfortable and work up to the other areas as pup improves. When pup enjoys your touches, add in other people pup knows touching, like family members. When pup can handle that add in gentle strangers once pup has completed the other training and is more comfortable with strangers. Don't rush these things but do practice very often and with lots of different people. Watch pup's reaction and go at a pace where pup can stay relaxed - the goal isn't just for pup to act good but actually feel better about people - so pup staying relaxed and happy around people is what you want to reward, which will mean going at the pace or distance pup an handle. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Sydney's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Sokka
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sokka
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks

My puppy has been pretty good for the most part. However he bites A LOT. Sometimes at ankles but usually and hands and clothes. His biting is painful and he bites any time he doesn’t like something touching him or being taken from him. I’ve tried different methods to stop this but absolutely nothing seems to be working. He has learned other commands fairly easy but won’t learn no, leave it, or to stop biting. It’s getting increasingly frustrating and i don’t know how to make him stop.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Nipping: Puppies may nip/bite/mouth for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. It also takes a little time for puppies this age to learn what is expected of them. So continue doing what you are doing, and hopefully you will find some new information to help you below. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

Add a comment to Sokka's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
henry
Australian Shepherd (Standard, Toy or Miniature)
9 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
henry
Australian Shepherd (Standard, Toy or Miniature)
9 Months

she nalways bite my wife and my 2son

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting. The tips below are geared towards younger puppies, but the process is exactly the same. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to henry's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Gemma
Australian Shepherd Basset hound
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Gemma
Australian Shepherd Basset hound
3 Years

My dog for some reason has ran out to the street an has now nipped 2 children. But some odd reason they have bein on bikes an it has only bein boys. An we have 3 daughters an she has never gone after them or another female. An also trys to nip boys? We are wondering how we could get this handled.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, due to the actual nipping, it is best to consult a trainer in your area for help before the nipping becomes a more serious problem. In the meantime, though, Gemma may be trying to herd the boys on the bikes (I think it is more the bikes than anything). The bikes are moving quickly and present a fun challenge. If you have a herding club in your area, redirect her energy there - and the instructor can give tips on how to keep the herding at the club, not at home. Work on the Clicker Method as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-trying-to-herd. The Australian Shepherd side of your dog is a working breed and will need lots of mental and physical stimulation and the clicker response may help the mental side of things. Work on Gemma's recall skills as well. Practice and practice until she responds 100% of the time - it is possible. This will prevent her from injury as well so that she does not get hit by a car which is another danger presented here. Take a look: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall. Good luck!

Add a comment to Gemma's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Moka
Australian Shepherd
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Moka
Australian Shepherd
7 Months

I have managed to stop my puppy from attempting to herd strangers. No nipping or chasing. However, I can not seem to be able to stop her from herding my 6 year old daughter. Any time my daughter tries to move inside or outside our puppy nips her calves and tries to keep her in the same room as the puppy. If they’re outside together this behaviour is even worse. The puppy gets very aggressive with anyone who goes near the kid. I feel like this is more of a protective behaviour except that the dog uses her innate herding skills to keep my daughter from her friends and our neighbours. As a side note the dog ignores my two older daughters and has no cares about who goes near them. What can I do?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I think it may be a good idea to call in a trainer to assess the problem and give you tips and tools to deter the behavior. I wouldn't want it to escalate into anything worse and cause your 6 year old to be afraid of the dog. The fact that there is aggression towards people who try to go near your daughter is concerning as well. That is my best suggestion. You can also try the methods here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-herd, including trying to redirect before the action takes place. Read the entire guide and see if any of the methods would suit Moka, such as the Rock Solid Recall Method. I would have Moka sit before all events. Have her sit before she is fed her meal, before getting her leash on for walks, before a treat, before playtime, etc so that she looks to you for leadership. If you haven't already, start her on her obedience commands and sign her up for classes so that she learns to follow your directions all of the time. If you cannot get her to stop herding soon, please call the trainer. All the best!

Add a comment to Moka's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Chief
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Chief
Australian Shepherd
2 Years

When kids are around he wants to nip at them and recently it has been around the face area. I know he is just trying to herd., but we have two small children ( with have no issue with him and them other than when they start running) and we don’t want it to escalate any further than to where one of the kids or anybody gets bit.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the Aussie does like to keep animals and kids in line, for certain. I imagine you are already doing so, but make sure that Chief is getting a lot of exercise, including lengthy walks and runs if possible. Take Chief to a large, fenced in area and throw the ball until he is exhausted. A tired dog is better behaved. Take a look at the methods here, including the Rock Solid Recall Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-herd. Recall skills can be fine-tuned here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Work on obedience commands as well, so that he listens when you tell him no, to stay, to lie down, etc.https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-basic-commands. If the training seems to not have an effect, consider obedience classes (Australian Shepherds love to learn!) or have a trainer come to the house. Safety is key as you have mentioned. I hope the training tips provided here help. All the best!

Add a comment to Chief's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Rocky
Australian Shepherd
11 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rocky
Australian Shepherd
11 Months

my Aussie is 11 months hes always biting my ankle and arms am all bruise he wont stop, even if we tell him too. am scare he will bite someone when hes outside

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! So it sounds like his herding instinct is coming out. This behavior is pretty typical for his breed. The best thing you can do when he does this is to give him an alternative. As soon as he starts to nip or bite, you stop what you are doing, freeze, then give him a command like sit or lay down. This puts you back in charge and it also shows him that when he behaves like that, he is not getting a reaction. Dogs tend to not care if a reaction is positive or negative. They just seek that reaction.

Add a comment to Rocky's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Moxie
Aussiedor
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Moxie
Aussiedor
10 Months

My dog is ten months old and will nip at my 13 year old daughters friends while inside. What do I do to get her to stop?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Molly, Is the nipping happening when pup wants attention or when the friends are moving around, like running. If so, the behavior might be due to excitement or wanting attention. If the behavior is due to aggression or fearfulness of strangers, I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you in person with this issue. For excitement and a herding instinct, I suggest teaching the following command, and keeping pup on a long drag leash while guest are around and pup is still learning the following manners. Having friends give pup these commands can also help once pup has learned them well. Out - leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Come: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Moxie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Cooper
Golden Retriever
16 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Cooper
Golden Retriever
16 Months

Not my dog but my roommates dog, is an Australian shepherd with no formal training, who always locks onto my golden retriever and nips him. It doesn’t matter where my dog is in the house if the Aussie sees him he will stalk my dog and nip him all over his body. He nips hard, and recently this escalated to a full blown bite to my dogs face. After that I was so mad I was done trying to have this dog interact with mine anymore, So they’ve had no interaction since then. My dog is recovering from a torn meniscus so he can’t defend himself completely and the stress puts unnecessary strain on his bad leg. I’m just wondering at this point if there’s anything to be done about this Australian Shepherd? Or if I can relay anything to my roommate to have them work on?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, What can be done depends a lot on your roommates willingness to work with their dog. Working on pup's respect and self-control in general through things like Place, a structured heel, Leave It, and having pup work for everything they get by doing a command first and practicing regular obedience commands in general, can help pup listen you the humans better and respect boundaries and rules. Pup can join a G.R.O.W.L. class, which is a class for dog reactive or aggressive dogs, who all wear a basket muzzle during class and are intensively socialized with other dogs. If there is resource guarding leading to fights, I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help with the issue in person - if your roommate is willing, that would definitely be a route I would recommend in general but I know money may be a limiting factor if they are not as concerned about the issue as you are, and would rather just keep the dogs separate. It is what I would recommend though, and the trainer needs to be someone who specializes in behavior issues like aggression and comes well recommended by their clients - not all trainers have aggression experience. Finally, if your roommate is willing, having the Australian Shepherd wear a basket muzzle, while both dogs are out, and wearing a drag leash. Teach the dog Leave It, Out, and Place. Have pup practice giving your dog space, staying on Place instead of following your dog around, and listening to general commands. Reward that dog for ignoring your dog when they are in the same room together, and being calm and obedient. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Even if things improve, the dogs should not be left unattended together though. Crate or confine in separate rooms when you are away even if they get to the point where they do fine - since the Aussie may be triggered easily still. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Cooper's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Skye
Australian Shepherd
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Skye
Australian Shepherd
2 Months

She likes biting my fingers and sometimes my clothes.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Skye's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ranger
Australian Shepherd (Standard, Toy or Miniature)
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ranger
Australian Shepherd (Standard, Toy or Miniature)
4 Months

Bites hard when told no. Attacks aggressive and will not back down, in fact becomes more aggressive when correction (attempt to correct). Has shown this behavior from when we purchased him at 7 weeks old from the breeder. Also, bites at heels when he wants to play or have us pay attention to him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello James, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Out command from the second article linked below to make her leave the area as a consequence. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The Out method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just playing, and hits up against pup's defense drive less, so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area, is also a good command for you to use. As a herding breed who is likely using their mouth to try to control your movement, this will be an important command. Check out the section on Using Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior for how to calmly enforce that command once it's taught. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. I would also keep a drag leash on pup while you are home to supervise (to make sure it doesn't catch on anything). When pup is not obeying, simply pick up the end of the leash and enforce your command (like Out or leave it), making pup move away and keeping the leash tight enough they can't bite you (but not strangling pup), until pup finally wears themselves out and stops...They may take pup 15 minutes of fighting the leash and you while you simply stand frozen holding pup away from you until they relax some - have the leash tight enough that pup can't wander away or come toward you, but loose enough that if pup relaxes and stands still, there isn't tension on the leash. This isn't a punishment mainly, but to help pup calm back down. When pup is really having a hard time, I recommend crating them or placing them into an exercise pen with a dog food stuffed chew toy because many puppies will get especially mouthy when over-tired and need some down time - sort of like a toddler throwing a temper tantrum when overtired. Finally, check out the free PDF E-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy, which can be downloaded at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Ranger's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Rocky
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rocky
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
3 Years

We adopted him a year ago. He has bitten me and my wife a couple of times. He gets agitated when wet, when he hears thunder, and when he’s in a prone posture, like on his back. We have learned to be careful and he generally likes a lot of contact and affection. The last two bites were unprovoked as far as I can tell and he wasn’t going to stop. He kept coming. I love him but I’m not sure if I can handle the worry of him snapping like that. At the moment I have a couple of deep holes in my fingers.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mike, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and fear to work with you in person, and to evaluate pup. This may be fear related - which would involve desensitizing pup to their fears through counter conditioning. This might be related to a lack of respect for you, and more structure and boundaries and less confrontational ways to increase trust and respect, like obedience and having pup work for everything they get in life and new rules around the home, being started to build respect. This could also be a genetic or neurological issue. Or likely a combination of a couple of things. The best way to figure out what's going on and address it correctly is for someone highly experienced with aggression to be able to observe pup and ask you a lot of questions about their history, then make a training plan and adjust it as you go based on how pup responds. You can also check out a couple of trainers who specialize in aggression online, such as Thomas from the canine Educator to learn more about aggression, but I would recommend an in person evaluation. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Rocky's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Blue
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blue
Australian Shepherd
2 Years

He has bitten our granddaughter two times in the last 6 months. She is 3. Tonight he bit her in the hand when she tried to hug him. He is not an aggressive dog. Very playful

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest finding a professional trainer in your area who specializes in behavior issues like fear and aggression. I would work with them to desensitize pup to being touched and to the presence of kids using food rewards and having the kid toss pup treats for good responses - with safety measure like a back tie leash and the kid being kept far enough away from pup to remain safe and not stress pup too much. Hugging is a very intimidating, challenging gesture for someone to make towards a dog in general - many dogs can feel trapped or like the child is trying to dominate them. Kids are often unpredictable, sometimes rough, loud, scary, and harder to respect for many dogs. Dogs who didn't grow up around little kids can have an especially hard time with them. All that doesn't mean a bite is ever okay, it simply explains why kids are more often bitten. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Blue's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Neska
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Neska
Australian Shepherd
2 Years

We have 4 female dogs in the home of different ages, 11 and 12 yr old Aussie/ border collie mixes. And a 7 month old Great Pyrenees. The 2 yr old Aussie has started to become aggressive with the older dogs. It’s not about food, but I feel it’s about position or attention. We have removed her after the altercations and made her submit (lay down), then ignore until we ask her to come back. I can catch her before at times when she does the stare. The Great Pyrenees seems to want to stop her when it starts at times because she will stand over her and Neska will not attack her. I don’t want the Great Pyrenees to learn this attack behavior.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amy, It does sound like their may be some competing going on, based on the standing over her behavior - which is a show of dominance. There could also be a lack of impulse control on Neska's part. I would work on adding a lot of structure to the dogs' routine, especially Neska. I would also follow the methods from the article I have linked below for Neska, especially the Working method. How are the other dog's responding and interacting with her? It's possible the other dog(s) are also starting things with intimidating looks/posturing/guarding behavior that needs to be addressed, and Neska lacks impulse control and is getting triggered by the other dogs' behavior too. If that's going on, you will want to work on building the other dogs' respect for you too, and doing things like the working method and giving more structure and rules in the home for those dogs also. Working method - all methods are worth a read too though. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you I would crate train all dogs who may be causing issues, teach all dogs a 1 hour Place command, and start making the dogs who are causing issues work for what they get in life. Make any dog who gets pushy, blocks another dog's access to somewhere or is in any way bullying leave the room. Crate Training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also consider having any dogs fighting were a basket muzzle when they are loose together, desensitizing them to the basket muzzles using their daily meal kibble ahead of time. As well as, hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to oversee things and guide the training. They will be able to ask more questions, observe the dogs together, and adjust the training as you go, depending on how the dogs' are responding - things I am not able to do in my response to you here. They can also show you how to keep things safer between the dogs right now through management while things are tense. Muzzle introduction video - Expect this to take a couple of weeks, not one session for a dog who hasn't worn a muzzle before. Use a silicone basket muzzle for comfort. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Neska's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Bleau
Australian Shepherd
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bleau
Australian Shepherd
1 Year

Bad nipping when excited, or when we try and correct he nips and throws tantrums

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Bleau's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ellie
Australian Shepherd
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ellie
Australian Shepherd
4 Months

Ellie is new to the home so I'm not upset with this behavior by any means. She is doing very well with sit and come inside the home. Outside, she wants to run towards runners or bikers, and gets eager to say hello to other dogs/people. We are working on "come", "stay" and "sit" and she had her best day outside today. I've started a couple of "heel" training sessions where she will get close to me. However, i would like to jog with her but she tries to nip my ankles while doing so. I've read that heel may help and going faster but looking for any advice on what to train to better it!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Ellie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Milo
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Milo
Australian Shepherd or Mini or Toy Australian Shepherd
10 Months

Milo is a great puppy, very loving! However ever since he was about 12 weeks old he has growled or snarled at us when corrected for inappropriate behavior. Examples, consistently biting the leash when we go for a walk, trying to stop him from chewing on rugs and other things, trying to remove him from a situation that is inappropriate. Just recently though and very worrisome to me, he has started to lunge and nip after he snarls at you for something you are correcting or he doesn't want you to do. Example- I try to stop him from following one of the kids outside. He will role on his back if I try to pick him up and get very angry and snarl and nip at me now. He shows no aggression with his food and is otherwise a very sweet puppy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Allie, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to work with you on desensitizing pup to touch again. Because pup is now an adult I would work on a professional for this due to risk of a bite. I would also have the trainer evaluate whether respect needs to be build or if this is simply an issue of pup having a bad association with being touched due to past experiences and becoming defensive. I suspect trust needs to be re-built around touch, but respect may also need to be gentle build also through non-physical methods like the Obedience and Working methods from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you With the help of a professional, you can desensitize pup to touch by having pup earn their meal kibble one piece at a time. Gently touching an area of pup's body while feeding a piece of food with your other hand - keeping touches only as long as it takes pup to eat the treat and gentle. Practice with various areas of pup's body, including collar holding. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Milo's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ford
Australian Shepherd
4 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Ford
Australian Shepherd
4 Years

Hello,

I have an Australian shepherd. She is 4 years old. Her name is Ford.
We dont have anything for her to herd. I also have a labrador retriever who is 12 years old. Ford is always jealous and tries to herd our other dog. Ford has been mean to people she doent know very well ever since my pap accidental broke her leg. If she didnt know you well before the leg incident she is very mean. There is one particular person she hates, but like I said if she didnt know you before the incident she seems she wants to ripp you apart. At any family gathering I have to put her in my down stairs bathroom so she isn't interacting with the other people. She barks at almost everything. How do I get her trained well to not bit and be calmer around people safely.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Ford looks like a beautiful dog and I'm sure you want the best for her. I think the best way to help her is to call in a trainer to the home who is experienced in working with aggressive dogs. This will give you the tools you need to help Ford learn that people are kind and not a threat. You can try working with her on your own with methods described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers. The methods are all very good and I suggest you read the guide through in its entirety. You will need to start with a foundation of basic training. Ford will need to know commands and the way to help her to learn is well described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. Again, read the guide all the way through and start working with Ford 10 minutes a day. Helpful videos and the opportunity to join a support group can be found here: https://robertcabral.com/. But do look for a trainer in your area; they can help you to teach Ford that she need not be fearful. All the best to Ford and good luck!

Add a comment to Ford's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Kobe
Australian Shepherd
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kobe
Australian Shepherd
6 Months

When playing he start to get a lil rambunctious and when I go to stop the situation he get aggressive with me. I have to sit and calm him down before I can put his muzzle on him even then with the muzzle. I struggle a lot when he is off leash to come to me as well, when present with other dogs he ignores me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Susan, This is something you may want to have a professional trainer evaluate in person, to see if pup simply lacks impulse control and is getting overly aroused while excited and playing - which is very common for puppies this age, or if pup is truly exhibiting aggression and trying to harm you, which would need to be addressed in a different way than the lack of impulse control. I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command from the Leave It method found in the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If pup is getting too rambunctious and it's an impulse control issue and not aggression stemming from something more series, and pup is mouthing you while excited and not breaking the skin, then I suggest practicing something called "Jazz up and Settle Down". Which is a bit like red light, green light for dogs. To do this, during training, get him a little excited, then command "Stop" or something he knows like "Sit", and freeze. Wait and completely ignore him until he calms back down. As soon as he gets calm or sits, praise and give a treat. Tell him "Let's Play!" again, and start playing and getting him a bit excited again. As soon as he starts to get a little worked up (not too much at first), command "Stop" or "Sit" again, then wait, reward with a treat when he calms down, then continue the game after he is rewarded. Repeat this a few times each training session, then end the session (have lots of frequent shorter sessions throughout the day at his age). As he improves, and can really calm down quickly, let him get a bit more excited before calling Stop. Gradually work up to him becoming more and more excited and having to calm down quickly from a higher level of excitement as he improves. Also, understand that this will take some time and practice. Puppies have to learn self-control just like any other skill, while young. This game can help him develop it sooner though. For pup's recall issues around other dogs, practice pup's recall on a long training leash like the article I have linked below mentions. Don't do this inside a dog park because of the safety risk of having pup on leash in there, but go to locations like outside the dog park, neighborhoods, and normal parks and practice with dogs in the distance, or ideally recruit friends with friendly dogs to practice around. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ For the muzzle, the Jazz up Settle down game can help with that if over excitement is related to the biting, but I also recommend working on the muzzle introduction process again. Check out the video linked below and practice that with pup often, not just when they are excited and you want to muzzle but also and more often, when pup is calm ahead of time to simply create a good habit of allowing you to put it on safely. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s If pup doesn't already like the muzzle, and especially if pup dislikes it, spend a couple of weeks slowly working up to the muzzle actually being on pup, simply rewarding pup for gradual progress around the muzzle and touches and short periods of holding his face in it, before you buckle it and use it, so pup learns to like it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Kobe's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Marley
Australian Shepherd
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Marley
Australian Shepherd
6 Months

She jumps at us and bites when excited.
She jumped at my friend today out of the blue in the dog park (that was empty and we had been there for 15 min) and bit her at the belly level tearing her coat and eating hand sized piece of cloth and duvet!!!! Regardless of all the ‘no biting’ commands and I actually hold her mouth, she still doesn’t understand. It was a scary moment.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Marley's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Georgie
Australian Sheperd
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Georgie
Australian Sheperd
11 Weeks

He keeps biting us. Ruining my cloths. Telling hime no, giving him his toys instead and yelping arent helping a whole lot.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Georgie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Bondi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bondi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months

My 5 month old Aussie bites me. He bites me when I try to put his leash on and take it off as well with harness and collar. He bites me when I am just walking through the house or just near him. I’ve tried the yelp method, the ignore method, etc. Everything just makes him go harder. He has gotten me pretty bad several times and just won’t stop when I try to correct or simply ignore. Other times he is a sweet dog...especially to everyone but me. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claire, It sounds like in addition to normal puppy mouthing, you may also be dealing with some potential nipping due to herding instincts. Check out the article linked below and the Leave It method. This method will take sometime to build up his self-control, so practice often and look for gradual progress opposed to an immediate fix, to show that it's working. If things don't improve, I would look for a trainer who has experience with herding breeds and teaching impulse control. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also work on desensitizing pup to touch. Use puppy’s daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Bondi's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Tux
Australian Shepherd
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Tux
Australian Shepherd
10 Weeks

My dog bites a lot. Especially when I try to move him

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Tux's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Leroy
Australian Shepherd
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Leroy
Australian Shepherd
3 Years

Our Aussie is a sweet dog and is very good with our 4 year old. However, the last six months, out of the blue he will bit one of our extended family members, usually drawing some blood. We are not sure why, but he has done it 4, or so, different times now and we cannot put any real kind of pattern to the behavior. Each time there was either a lot of commotion going on, or the one time my father-in-law was trying to get his small dog onto his lap and Leroy bit him in the arm. We got Leroy when he was 8 months because his other family didn’t have the time or space to care for a dog that needs lots of exercise, and we did. When we first got him, he was really bad about nipping at our feet when we walked, but luckily we pretty much trained that out of him. The current issue we are having a hard time figuring out what to do because we can’t really pin point when it is going to happen. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Add a comment to Leroy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd