How to Train Your Dog to Be Patient

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Dogs can be some of the most impatient beings on the planet. When you ask if they want to go for a ride, they are practically in the car before you can even turn to find your car keys. If you have food that you are preparing for yourself or for them, they are literally drooling before you can even get the package open. 

If your dog is not patient, he could become obnoxious and dangerous. Dogs who are impatient tend to jump all over their owners because they can't wait and are so excited they don't know how to control it. Some dogs aren't patient enough to wait for food and will bite the hand that feeds them. Teach your dog to be patient and to wait so he not only has good manners, but is also a little calmer until he gets what he wants.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog to be patient can be as simple as training your dog to wait. There will be different scenarios when you do need your dog to be patient, whether it's opening the door for him to go outside without ruining the screen, the curtains, or your pants or waiting for food without jumping on you or the counter or stealing food from your hand before you're ready to give it to him. Teach your dog to be patient with the things he's most excited about. This could include activities, tasks, and food. Do not give in to your dog and allow him to have the things or activities he wants until he is patient. Giving in will only teach him that behaving obnoxiously will get him what he wants. 

Getting Started

To train patience with your dog, you will need lots of tasty treats and actions or activities your dog will be eager to do. If your dog is one to jump all over the screen door before you can get to the door to open it, then that is the place where you need to start your training. If your dog often goes for car rides and is so excited that he's jumping all over the car, that's a great place to train as well. Start training your dog to be patient when it comes to food and then work on activities.

The 'Watch Me' Method

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Step
1
Attention
Take a walk together and get your dog’s attention by saying his name.
Step
2
Stand still
Once you have his attention, stop walking and don’t move. Wait until your dog stops and stands or sits with you calmly.
Step
3
Treat
Hold up a treat to your face close to your nose or eyes so your dog looks at your face. Say the command "watch me."
Step
4
Reward
Once your dog looks at you and gives you his attention, give him verbal praise and the treat as a reward.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat these steps in various situations, practicing the ‘watch me’ command. When your dog stops and gives you his attention, give him a treat.
Step
6
Practice patience
Begin to have your dog practice patience by using the ‘watch me’ command any time he is too excited or impatient. This command gives pause to the event taking place and forces your dog to wait patiently until you are ready.
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The 'Wait' Method

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Step
1
Start on-leash
Put your dog on a leash and take a short walk together. You can do this in your home or in your yard. This doesn’t need to be a long walk.
Step
2
Stop
After taking a few steps, stop and face your dog.
Step
3
Hand signal
Hold your palm out toward your dog and say the command "wait."
Step
4
Stop dog
Block the dog’s path while keeping your hand up, palm facing out toward the dog.
Step
5
Dog stops
Once your dog stops walking, give him a treat.
Step
6
Walk more
Walk a bit more with your dog and continue to stop and ask him to wait. When he stops with you, give him a treat.
Step
7
Practice
Continue to practice the 'wait' command while on walks together. Begin to use the command more in everyday situations such as when he wants to eat, get in the car, or go outside to keep him from being too excited and reacting in an obnoxious manner.
Recommend training method?

The Bowl of Treats Method

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Step
1
Bowl
Get your dog’s food bowl and place some high-value treats in it, but do not set it down right away.
Step
2
Start to Lower
Lower the bowl in an effort to set it in place. Expect your dog to react and rush to the bowl.
Step
3
Negative behavior
If your dog rushes the bowl or shows impatience, pull the bowl back up and take a step away from your dog.
Step
4
Be patient
Tell your dog to 'be patient' and try to set the bowl down again.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat the steps above until your dog is patient and allows you to set the bowl down without rushing you or the bowl. This will take lots of practice and encouragement to be patient.
Step
6
Reward
Once your dog waits patiently for you to set the bowl in place, let him eat the treats from the bowl.
Step
7
Practice
Keep practicing the ‘be patient’ key phrase and use these steps for other times your dog is impatient.
Step
8
Manners
Expect your dog to be patient any time he is overly anxious and excited for something he wants. For instance, if he is used to jumping on the door when he wants to go outside, ask him to be patient and take a step back away from the door ,waiting for him to back up and wait patiently for you to open the door. Just be careful making a house training puppy wait to go outside.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

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