How to Train Your Chow Chow Dog to Come

Medium
4-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

Chow Chow dogs have an independent nature. They want to be trusted and need to feel like they are their own decision makers. But if your Chow Chow can’t be trusted to come when you call him, he will not be able to have the independence he desires. You cannot be at the dog park or outside off-leash and not know if your Chow Chow will come to you when you ask him to. A dog who does not understand and follow this command can be at risk of injury or hurting another dog. 

Whether you are training him to come to you when called while outside to keep him safe or training him to come when you call him while around the house, training your dog to come when called helps to set expectations. Once he’s trained to come, your Chow Chow will know when he hears the command or his name it’s worth coming to you. 

Defining Tasks

Training your Chow Chow to come will require dedication and patience. Remember, this is a dog who is independent and will want to be making his own choices. You’ll need to give him a good reason to make the right choice--to come when called. A younger Chow Chow will require short training sessions with high rewards, and an older Chow Chow who already knows what independence looks like will need more time training, more patience from you, and rewards that will entice him to use his manners and listen and obey. This will be repetitive training and will require commitment from you. It might feel as if your Chow Chow gets this command and then reverts back to not listening to you. Do not give up at this point. Stay strong and keep training. Your Chow Chow will push his boundaries, so be prepared.

Getting Started

High-value treats will be important for getting your Chow Chow to come to you. You can work with toys as well training your Chow Chow to fetch and come back to you, bringing the toy along as well. Keep your training sessions no longer than fifteen minutes each, though you can do them several times a day. Make sure during training your Chow Chow is engaged. 

The Early Training Method

Most Recommended
6 Votes
Step
1
Puppy
When you are training your Chow Chow puppy, keep him close to you. This will teach your puppy you are his caregiver, building that bond and trust between the two of you.
Step
2
Playtime
During playtime with your pup, practice having him come to you by enticing him with a toy he loves to play with. Keep the distance between the two of you small so he is not distracted by something else, and during training times always train in a small, safe place such as your backyard or a quiet area of a park or even inside your home.
Step
3
Play with two toys
Toss one toy a few feet away from you while you and your Chow Chow are playing, expecting him to go get the toy.
Step
4
Call back
Call your pup by name and then use the word 'come' and show him the second toy you have in your hand. Because you are spending quality play time together and he's excited to play, he should want to come explore the toy you have. You can also do this with treats if he is not interested in a toy.
Step
5
Come
When your Chow Chow comes to you after you have called him back, give him a treat and lots of verbal praise to celebrate his return to you after you've asked him to come.
Step
6
Repeat and practice
Repeat these high energy moments with toys and treats, encouraging your Chow Chow puppy to come back to you every time you say his name and the command 'come' together. Practice increasing the distance between you and your Chow Chow and asking him to return to you using the command to come.
Step
7
Reward
Remember to always reward your Chow Chow when he returns to your side after giving the command to come.
Step
8
Command
Once he understands by repetition the command and your expectations, use the same command every time you expect him to come back to you, whether he is on a leash in your kitchen or out in your backyard.
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The Recall Method

Effective
3 Votes
Step
1
Choose a command
Choose a recall command you will use with your Chow Chow. This could be your dog's name or it could be the word 'come' or 'here.' Whichever command you choose to use to recall your Chow Chow, be sure you are consistent and use the same one on a regular basis.
Step
2
Schedule training
Set aside some time with your Chow Chow specifically to work on recalling him. This needs to be quiet distraction-free training time so your Chow Chow can focus on you and the mission of coming back to you when called.
Step
3
Recall
Begin playing with your Chow Chow. You can play tug-of-war with a rope or toss with a tennis ball. Practice calling him back to you using the command you chose.
Step
4
Entice
You want to give reason for your Chow Chow to return to you when you are using the recall command. You should only say the command word once, even if this is his name. Saying the recall command more than once will train your dog he has to hear it more than once before he bothers to come back to you. To get him to want to come, you need to entice him by showing him you have something special he wants to get.
Step
5
Ignore
If your Chow Chow decides to ignore you, take a break and a few deep breaths then go over to him for some more play time. Do not repeat the recall command if he does not give you his attention.
Step
6
Try again
During your play time together, let your Chow Chow see the treat you have but don't give it to him. Take a few steps away from him and try to recall him using your command again. This time, if he isn’t interested, let him see the treat you have and then drop it at your feet.
Step
7
Practice
Keep practicing recalling and rewarding your dog when he comes back to you. Remember to keep his reward high and do not go too far from him while training to recall. As he comes to you more and more, increase your distance from him.
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The Hand Signal Method

Least Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Leash
Put your Chow Chow on a leash and stand close to him.
Step
2
Treat
Start your training off with a treat. As soon as you get him secured on a leash, give him a treat just for tolerating the leash without going for a walk.
Step
3
Step forward
Take a few steps away from your dog and then stop.
Step
4
Hand signal
Drop your hand to your side and hold it out palm flat, facing your dog. Use your dog's name and the command word "come". Because he's not very far from you, it should only be a few steps to get to you. If he does not move, have a treat ready in the hand that's holding the leash and show it to him.
Step
5
Come
When your Chow Chow takes a step towards you, give him the treat.
Step
6
Repeat
Practice this several times, taking several steps away from your dog and repeating the hand signal with your hand down, palm flat facing out toward him and using the word ‘come’ as a command.
Step
7
Increase distance
As your Chow Chow gets to know this hand signal and the command word 'come', as well as the reward when he comes back to you, increase the distance between you and your dog.
Step
8
Off-leash
Take your Chow Chow somewhere he can be off leash or in your backyard where he cannot run too far from you. Practice the steps above, using the command word and the hand signal, expecting your dog to drop what he's doing and come towards you. Remember to entice him and reward him with a treat.
Step
9
Keep it up
This connection your Chow Chow needs to make between the command word, the hand signal, the action, and the treat may take some time. Practice often but in short sessions, keeping your dog engaged and constantly rewarding him for doing a good job and giving you his attention.
Step
10
Add distractions
After a few weeks of consistent training, add some distractions. The command 'come' is really important when you are out and about with your dog, when his attention is on something else, or when your dog is off-leash and needs to obey you and be by your side. Offering distractions will remind him that his attention maybe grabbed elsewhere but he still needs to obey you when you call him.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 01/04/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Amber
chowspitz
2 Months
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Amber
chowspitz
2 Months

How to train my dog not to pee or poop in her cage?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you quite a bit of information on potty training and using the crate to aid in that process. Some of it you may know already, but somewhere in the info, you may see something that you missed. Hi! I am going to send you information on both potty training and crate training should you decide to utilize a crate to aid in potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Dirham
Chow Chow
3 Months
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Dirham
Chow Chow
3 Months

I got my Chow when he was 8 weeks old. We spent about 2 weeks together when I had to leave the country for 2 weeks. Now that I’m back, it seemed like he had developed a biting habit. He’s even biting me now and doesn’t listen to my commands anymore. I know most of the time it’s just play time for him but I’m really worried that he might be dangerous for the people around him when he gets older and bigger. How do I train him and teach him not to bite?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lupita, Dirham is right in the middle of teething so biting is extremely normal. Check out the article that I have linked below. At his age you can use any of the methods. The 'Bite Inhibition" method will teach him better control of his mouth gradually, helping him to be gentle as an adult even during times of stress and injury, before learning to stop all biting completely. When he approaches five months of age, then switch to the "Leave It" method and enforce your "Leave It" command with the "Pressure" method, to get him to stop biting completely when his jaws are stronger. You can also go straight to using the "Leave It" method, and once he understands the "Leave It" command, if he disobeys it, then you can use the "Pressure" method to enforce your command. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Gizmo
Chow Chow
15 Months
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Gizmo
Chow Chow
15 Months

Just recently (I have had him only 3 mo) He has started growling and snapping at me today already 3 times once at his dish once for no apparent reason at the door and once when I was at his bed. He is well exercised and I feel that now that he knows he has frightened me with this action he may be doing more often to get my reaction. I do not engage with him when he does it now but the first time it scared me and I scolded him, this was about two weeks ago. Today I simply walked away. He is registered and I adopted him at a county shelter they had very little info on him just that he was surrendered due to lack of time. His coat is now coming out beautifully he was rough when I brought him home. At first he would allow me to groom him (not paws) with high value treats now not I can brush a bit but I am never sure if he will snap. Yesterday at the vet he had to be sedated in order to administer his shot and nail trim. The last visit he allowed me to muzzle him and it went fairly smooth with treats. Not so this time. I had to leave him for sedation. This activity is escalating and I need to know how I should react when he is behaving or right after a snap. Please help! Thanks Paula

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paula, I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you right away. It sounds like he has a low tolerance level and is not giving warnings which is a huge issue. Unfortunately, not giving warning signals is something Chow's have a reputation for. It could be because of their hair, short tails, or other features that make those warnings very subtle, but either way have a professional trainer who is experienced with aggression help you. Read reviews, ask questions and make sure the trainer has experience with more than just fear aggression. He needs to be evaluated to see exactly what is going on (possessiveness- which I suspect, dominance - which I also suspect, fear - possible with touch, ect...) Because of the lack of warnings I suggest having him wear a basket muzzle during the day right now. Pair it with treats like you were doing to make it pleasant, so that it becomes routine to him. Use a basket muzzle so that you can feed treats through the muzzle's holes and he can learn to drink with it on. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Loki
Chow cow (male)
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Loki
Chow cow (male)
4 Months

Hi I got my chow chow 6 days ago I'm finding it very difficult to put a collar on him he wants to bite me all the time and barks I now try to put a harness on but I've now put gloves on as he has bitten a few times he has been to training twice this wk and the trainer tried to put his collar on and he bit him also, I managed to get a half chain collar on this morning by putting a treat in my hand through the collar but he won't let me tighten it he just won't have it what do i do as it scares me sometimes thank you, any help would be appreciated

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yvonne, I suggest working on teaching him to tolerate touch in general and including the collar in the exercise by practicing touching it to him and giving a treat at the same time. First, practice touching him on different area of his body and giving treats at the same time; do this before practicing with the collar. Once he is more tolerant of being touched in general, then start touching the collar to him and giving treats at the same time (before he has a chance to try to bite). Once he is comfortable with the collar being touched to him, then add the step of buckling and unbuckling it, while giving a couple of treats, one treat at a time, while doing this. To practice the touching exercises, touch an ear while giving a treat, touch a paw while giving a treat, touch his side while giving a treat, touch his tail while giving a treat, touch his neck while giving a treat, touch his shoulder while giving a treat, touch his side while giving a treat, touch a paw while giving a treat, ect...Start with the areas he is least reactive with and progress to more sensitive areas as he adjusts. Once he is comfortable being touched all over, then touch him first and give the treat right after instead of giving the treat during the touch. Once he is used you putting the collar on him, while he is wearing it, practice gently grabbing his collar and giving a treat while your hand is on it, then practice clipping the leash on and off and giving a treat. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Poppy
Chow Chow
2 Years
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Poppy
Chow Chow
2 Years

Hi,
I adopted a two year old Chow two weeks ago who has previously had no training or play time.

I am struggling with basic training techniques having watched videos online, also she seems to have no interest in play time though I’m unsure if it’s just her chow nature or she doesn’t know how to play.

I’d appreciate any guidance you can provide.

Thank you

Jonny

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jonathan, Chows do tend to be independent, serious, and almost cat like. It is likely that her natural personality is just not that interested in play. She might have been able to learn how to do it a bit more as a puppy if she had been raised with you early on, but it would have been something she would have had to learn more than certain other breeds, and less something that she always wants to do on her own now that she is an adult. Chows do get very attached to their owners but it is typically in a more loyal, serious, hang out with you, and watch over you type of way instead of affectionate, cuddly, and more interactive. They can be very catlike in personality, but with a dog's loyalty. You might be able to teach her to play by making it a job for her and training her to perform an activity and then reward her for it. For example, you might be able to teach her to fetch if she gets a reward, like a treat, for bringing the ball back to you. Overtime she might learn to enjoy the game without the treats too. By rewarding her with something else that she does like, you can connect that game or activity to the reward, teaching her to like the game also eventually, because she associates the game with something she considers pleasant, the treat and how the treat makes her feel. You can also train her to play hide and seek by making it a job of finding you and then being rewarded for it, opposed to wanting to find you just for the fun of it. It's essentially training her to play. The more games you teach her, the more likely she is to learn new games more easily. When training a Chow it is important for that dog to respect you. Because Chows are less naturally willing to please for the emotional gratification of it, unlike a Golden Retriever, your dog is more likely to work for you if she views you as worthy of her respect. Chows are very loyal typically. Be very consistent with your rules and boundaries with her. Be patient and kind still, but when you tell her to do something calmly and firmly insist that she does it, even it that means standing there for several minutes without letting her leave until she obeys, or bringing her over to yourself and walking her through obeying by showing her how again. If you are trying to lure her into training positions, like sit, with food and she is not complying, then you might need to switch to a training method that depends less on motivating her with fun and more on gaining her respect mentally. For example, when teaching "Come" try using the "Reel" in method instead of one of the methods based on games in the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Choose methods like the "Reel In" method when teaching her other commands too. Methods that show her what to do and gently but firmly ensure that she obeys, rather than methods based on fun and games if she does not respond well to fun and games methods well. She might appreciate a more serious and practical approach if she does not enjoy playing. If she responds well to treats, then choose methods that utilize treats to teach her, but also be consistent with her and when you give her a command that she knows, if she chooses not to do it and not get the treat, make sure that she still obeys, whether she wants the treat or not. Be more stubborn than she is. She should learn that if she obeys, something pleasant like a treat will happen, but if she does not want a treat, she still has to obey anyways. Every dog is a bit different though, so if you find that your dog does not act like a typical Chow and more playful methods do work once she warms up to her new situation with you, then by all means use those methods still. If they don't tend to work, then consider a more practical method that shows her what to do, rewards her for obeying, and is a bit more serious. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Yoshi
Chow Chow
7 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Yoshi
Chow Chow
7 Months

Hi, i got my chow when he was 2-3months old. At first he was so gentle and like a behave dog. Aftr a weeks i bath him then wipe with dry towel he started biting it then he bites my hand then he is like a angry dog thats biting my feet my leggings and jumping wanted to bite. At first i thought that its just normal and wants to play only. But aftr days past when i play with him, he is suddenly just like that again with matchin angrily growling. And then thats continues i just saying stop or i'll go to my room when i finished dry him. But now he is in my room coz. My mother is scared of him coz what if he suddenly wants to bite again.and he is always like that after i or my cousin bathes him. I dont know what to do or why he is like that, we give or do whatever we can i did not scroll him i just saying stop it, or calling his name. I ended up leashing him so that he can calm. And then i'll brash his fur and make him feel good to his stomach. Please if there is any something i can do help, coz i really love this dog so much i dont want to get mad at him .that will make him hate me or he will really ignores me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, First, desensitize pup to being touched and groomed. Every day use his meal kibble as a reward for tolerating touches. Gently touch an area of pup's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. When pup will tolerate being touched all over, then add in the grooming tools, touch the towel to him and give a treat. Touch the brush to him and give a treat. Touch nail clippers to the nails and give a treat - make these touches brief at first. As he improves touch for longer while feeding a couple of treats in a row - rub the towel on him and feed two treats, a couple of seconds apart. Gently brush his fur a few times and feed two treats, a few seconds apart. Rub his paw for a few seconds - while feeding a few treats, a couple of seconds between each treat. Gently clip a tiny bit of his nail while feeding several treats, one right after the other (nail clipping is harder for him so more treats). Practice this daily when he isn't getting a bath. Second, work on teaching him the Leave It command. Follow the Leave It method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When you bath him, reward for treats when he is being tolerant and calm, stop rewards if he starts to bite during touch training or baths - until he is being calm again (do NOT give treats while biting or that can teach him to bite more - wait until he is being nice again). Tell him to Leave It anytime he starts to bite you or seems to be thinking about biting, and reward when he doesn't bite in a situation where he used to bite. Also, after you bath him you may want to give him some space to run around. Most dogs act super excited and goofy after a bath and will expel some energy by running around or rolling around - the biting might be his way of trying to do that so give him a more acceptable option instead of biting to get the "crazies" out and become calm again. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lincoln
Chow Chow
11 Weeks
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Lincoln
Chow Chow
11 Weeks

Lincoln is a chow mix that has started showing some possessive behavior when he has a treat such as a nylabone or chew stick. He has growled when anyone comes close to him. We have small children ages 4 and 2 so I want to fix this behavior soon.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Adriene, Work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Work on hand feeding, and also practice feeding him his meals in sections. Feed 1/4 of his meal, practice making him wait before digging in by holding onto the bowl, pulling it back whenever he tries to dive in (without letting go of it first), and calmly saying Wait, then after a few repetitions of this, when he hesitates and doesn't dive in while your hand is still on it, let go of the bowl and say "Okay!" in an excited tone of voice, and let him begin eating as a reward for waiting. As he eats, when he isn't growling, toss treats next to his bowl as you walk past him. Practice this from a few feet away until he begins to look forward to you approaching. As he improves, decrease the distance that you pass from. When he finishes the first serving, toss a treat behind him and pick up the bowl while he is distracted eating the treat. Give the next portion, have him practice waiting again, then do the treat tosses while he east again. Practice this until he has all of his meal kibble portions at that mealtime. Do this at every meal as often as you can. As he becomes relaxed and begins to like you approaching him during meals, get closer and closer, so that you are eventually placing treats into his bowl while he eats. Ease into this so that he stays relaxed during the process. When pup does great with your presence right by the bowl, you can give a gentle pet and feed a treat as you do so. Pet and feed a treat, then give space and go back to tossing the treats to avoid stressing him too much. Expect this progression to take weeks, not hours or days. Do NOT stick your hand in pup's food, take the food away while he is eating, or pet him while he is eating without making the experience fun for him also - via giving better rewards in exchange each time. Messing with a dog while they are eating without the right protocols and rewards to prevent stress around mealtimes, can actually cause food aggression, rather than prevent it. The goal is to build pup's trust with you when it comes to meals - so he doesn't feel the need to guard it, but learns that your approach and taking things like bones, results in something even better happening - like a treat or new bone. Only give treats when pup responds well - not while he is growling. If pup is growling still while you are doing all of this, you are probably being too rough or moving too fast, and there needs to be more space between you and pup while practicing at that point in the training. Practice the treat tosses while pup has a bone also, with your supervision work up slowly to the kids walking past and tossing treats (with your help and safety measures) when pup responds well. Also practice the Drop It command often with pup. Drop It section - start with toys pup cares less about and work up to bones as he improves. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-to-fetch/ Check out this free PDF e-book download for other puppy raising tips as well: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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teddy
Chow Chow
5 Months
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teddy
Chow Chow
5 Months

hey i had teddy since he was a month old he is the nicest little boy although i take him everywhere i go hes not frendly with other people at all only to the people he knows i would like to know what can i do to make him be nice to other people beacuse he would bark or even growl at them , he doesn’t like when people come over to my house he would bark and try to bite do you have some tips ? also he hates going to the groomer but lets me do everything i don’t know what to do i want him at least to accept people into the house also he loves other dogs until i touch the other dog do you have any idea why ? thank you so much

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ana, With human aggression starting at such a young age I do highly suggest hiring a trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues, is part of a larger training group so that pup can have a lot of exposure to other trainers to help with desensitization around them also, and comes well recommended by their previous clients. I would NOT wait. The sooner this starts getting addressed, the better chance pup has of improving while still young. Check out the article linked below and the section on shy dogs and humans. Extra precautions like a back tie leash will need to be taken since pup has bitten before. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ Check out the free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy; www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Work on building pup's respect for you, since it sounds like pup is also trying to resource guard you around other dogs, and possibly people. To do so, work on things like the working method linked below, teaching 1 hour long Place, directional commands like Off, Out (which means leave the area), Down, Leave It, and Off, so that you can tell them where they should and should not be in relation to being pushy with you or other dogs or people, crate trained, and don't pet or feed or give pup things when they demand it by barking nudging, climbing onto you uninvited, ect...Make pup work for what they get right now. Interact with pup patiently and calmly, but expect pup to work some and have boundaries. Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Keep a drag leash on the pup when you are present if they won't listen to your directional commands once learned well. Calmly lead them where you told them to go as needed by picking up the end of the leash. I do highly suggest getting professional help. This is an issue that can get severe if not addressed well now, since it's starting so early and pup has already bitten people. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Skywalker
Chow Chow
2 Months
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2 found helpful
Skywalker
Chow Chow
2 Months

Hello!
I recently got Sky and he is quite small and energetic. He was kept in a cage before and we have a very big house and a big garden so he is quite wary of his surroundings (we only got him a week ago). I want to start training him immediately but I do not know how affective it will be. How can I get him to open up to me and to people?

Thanks!
Mina

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mina, Start by feeding him all of his dry dog food as treats rather than in his bowl. Spend time teaching him very easy commands like sit, his name, and touch using the "Lure" method, what is called "Lure Reward Training". That type of training is very gentle and easy for puppies. Use his kibble food to do this. Also, place his kibble around areas and leading up to areas that he is afraid of. Make the house a fun treat treasure hunt in the specific areas that he is afraid of. For example, if he is afraid of a low window, then place a line of treats on the window sill and replace those treats for him to find again later after he eats them. Do this until he is no longer afraid of that window. If he is afraid to go into a particular room, then create a line of treats going into that room and go into the room and act like you are having a good time or relaxing until she over time chooses to join in. It's okay if it takes his a few days to work up the courage to do something totally new. Continue to make that thing fun with treats and your own happiness, and praise him for his courage when he tries. You can also clip him to yourself with a six-foot leash once you have spent time getting him used to the sensation of the leash. This can help him learn to stick with you, help you keep an eye on him, and bond. Spend time getting him used to going into new rooms before he has to follow you there though, so that he will not be afraid to enter that room. Every time you stop and sit, be sure to give him a chew toy, like a Medium or large sized Kong, stuffed with his dog food that has been soaked in water and stuffed into the Kong. You can also freeze these Kongs to make the treat last longer, provide teething relief, and decrease mess. You can add a little bit of peanut butter, cheese, or liver paste to the Kong food mush also. Make sure that the Peanut Butter does NOT contain Xylitol though. Xylitol is very toxic to dogs. Also, When you introduce him to new things act confident and excited yourself, not worried and sympathetic. Your excitement will help him learn that that object or place is fun and not scary. Once he is a little more comfortable, then also get him used to being touched and handled by gently touching an area of his body, like his ear, while you give him a treat every time. Practice these touches and rewards all over his body regularly for at least the next six months. Once he is used to your home and you a bit more, start bringing him to new places with you and introducing him to new people and places. Do this by carrying him anywhere where other dogs could have walked until he has all of his puppy shots. Viruses like Parvo are transmitted through contact with the ground where other dogs have eliminated or direct contact, so carrying your puppy can allow you to take him more places with you while he is young and at a crucial socialization age. Since he spend the first two months without a lot of exposure and may have a shy personality, this is especially important for him. Take treats with you when you go places and have other people feed him the treats when they greet him. Also, reward him and act happy whenever he comes across something new, especially when he is uncertain about the new thing. This will show him that the new thing is safe and even fun. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jethro
Chow Chow
7 Weeks
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Jethro
Chow Chow
7 Weeks

Hi, boy's name is Jethro, I got him just two days ago and he is a very intelligent boy. He's already potty trained at 7 weeks and he's wearing his collar with no issue since the first time I put it on him. I'm actually a vet student and have experience with handling beagles but this is my first time owning my own pup and its a chow at that!

I'm having a little trouble training him with lead/leash as he keeps biting at it. I bought a harness as well but I have not habituated him with it yet as I wanted him to get used to the lead with the collar. I'm also struggling to find a treat that he really likes and considers a high reward, so far he's only shown interest in peanut butter! Any advise? I would really like to get him on a lead so that I can take him for walks.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would suggest that you work on the Heel command with Jethro. He seems to learn very quickly and this is good practice to keep him focused and moving as opposed to biting at the leash. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel The Turns Method is very good. And the Treat Lure Method will help you keep Jethro working and focusing. As for the treat, you can purchase at the pet supply store, a soft dried treat that is called the Liver Treat (small pieces only as it is rich).You can also look up recipes for dog-friendly cookies and biscuits that you can make with natural ingredients. A note about the peanut butter - it is fine to give dogs peanut butter but be very careful to check the ingredients. The sweetener xylitol is often added and is highly toxic to dogs - being a vet student you probably already know, but I thought best to mention it. Good luck!

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Misha
Chow Chow
1 Year
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Misha
Chow Chow
1 Year

Our one year old chow is not at all friendly with other dogs. She growls at almost every single dog she sees/meets. She’s mostly fine with other people and even pretty good with little kids. We have a roommate downstairs that just got a puppy, and we are anxious to see how their relationship grows.
We are also trying to train her to come to her name. She seems to know what we want her to do, but isn’t motivated by affection or treats. I really would love to get her able to be off leash in the future, and I would like to start as early as possible.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on socializing, as well as coming when called. So this response is going to be rather lengthy! Here is information on socializing: Begin by teaching your dog that the sight of another dog means good things will happen. Employ your dog’s favorite doggy friends for these practice sessions, and keep all dogs on leash while you are training. Once your dog has mastered the basics, you can begin to expose him to strange dogs while on leash, either at a dog park or in your neighborhood. Start with the other dog far enough away that your dog notices him but does not react. Each time your dog looks at the other dog without barking or otherwise reacting, mark with a “good” and treat. When you first begin, your dog will likely be nervous when he sees the other dog and he may only turn toward you for a moment, to get his treat, before looking back at the other dog. Treat frequently in the beginning, until your dog learns to relax. Once your dog can look at another dog without reacting, teach him to turn and sit facing you when you stop on a walk. Reward your dog for staying in his sit, or for maintaining eye contact with you, while the other dog passes by. Next, teach your dog to heel on leash as he approaches the other dog. Hold your dog on a loose leash; a tight leash can heighten reactivity. Treat your dog when he walks next to you; if he pulls on the leash or crosses in front of you, stop walking. Use a treat to lure him back to your side. Walk toward the other dog at an angle or perpendicular to the other dog, rather than head on. After a series of successful approaches, reward your dog with an off-leash play session in a safe area. In addition to teaching your dog to heel, teach him to turn with you on cue. Work on both a 90-degree turn and a 180-degree turn. Give your dog a cue, such as “turn” and lure him towards you. As soon as he turns, treat and continue walking forward rewarding the heel. A turn can be used to create distance between your dog and another dog, and allows you to focus on calming behaviors until your dog learns to relax when another dog is nearby. You can divert your dog’s attention by walking up a driveway, crossing the street, or moving behind a barrier such as a parked car or bush. Finally, turn spotting another dog into your canine’s cue to do a trick he enjoys. Excellent replacement behaviors include hand targeting, down stay, shake, spin, roll over and play dead. Certain cues may be causing your dog to react when he’s on leash or behind a barrier. The sound of approaching dogs, such as jingling tags or vocalizations, may set your dog off. When you are walking with your dog, you may inadvertently jerk or tighten the leash when you get nervous about an approaching dog. These cues make your dog even more tense. Change your dog’s association by pairing these cues with something pleasurable. Practice tightening the leash and giving your dog a reward. Pair the barking or collar jingling of another dog with the onset of a treat party. Extra exercise outside of training situations and away from other dogs, such as treadmill workouts or fetch, can also be helpful for dogs with barrier frustration. Dog-friendly canines can benefit from a play session with another dog before training to satisfy their desire for interaction. In addition, using food puzzles instead of food bowls to feed your pet helps to channel his extra energy. A Thundershirt can be extremely beneficial in training dogs with barrier frustration. Adding the pressure wrap shirt to a training session automatically calms many anxious canines. Collars are not the best solution for dogs that react on leash, because they don’t allow you to pull your dog around to face you when needed. Instead, use a harness that clips on the dog’s chest, or a head halter for optimal control. In an emergency, if your dog becomes overwhelmingly worked up at the sight of an approaching dog, you can distract him by tossing treats on the ground for him to pick up until the other dog is past. Now onto coming when called: Teaching your dog to come to you when called is an essential part of proper dog training. Often referred to as a "recall," it is one of the most important basic dog commands. Training your dog for the recall cue can help you keep it under control while allowing it some off-leash freedom. Once this cue is mastered, you can protect the dog from a potentially dangerous situation by calling it to you. Plan Short Training Sessions Training your dog to come when called is fairly simple, but it takes some dogs longer than others to learn. Your dog's ability to learn the recall command largely depends on its attention span and vulnerability to distraction. You must work on training regularly and use valuable rewards. Plan to train your dog in short training sessions of between five to 15 minutes at least three times a week but no more than twice a day. Avoid Distractions While your dog will have to learn to filter out some distractions, don't try to train it in an environment where it will be overstimulated by noise or smells. Ideally, you and your dog will be the only ones in the house with everyday conditions (such as lights and ambient sounds) when you start the training. Use Treats In the beginning, use a favorite toy or your dog's favorite training treats. Hold up a toy or treat, then say your dog's name followed by "come" in a clear, excited tone. If necessary, make movements such as tapping your knees and stepping backward. As soon as your dog comes to you, reward it, then praise it lavishly—but try not to cause overexcitement. Don't Chase Your Dog Never run after your dog if it bolts during these training sessions. This will confuse the dog and turns training into a game. Try turning it around by calling the dog's name and running away from it. Your dog may then run after you in play. If so, reward it with praise when it gets to you. Problems and Proofing the Behavior Repeat five or six times, gradually moving to different areas of your home, including outdoors. As your dog improves, move to areas with more distractions. Gradually increase the distance between you and your dog. You may wish to use a longer lead. Once your dog has mastered the recall while on the long leash, practice it without any leash, but only indoors or in a fenced-in area. Slowly phase out the toy or treat rewards, but keep rewarding with much praise. Your dog must learn to come to you without food or toy rewards. In the real world, you may need it to come, but not have anything to give it except praise. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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remi
chow mountain cur m
6 Weeks
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remi
chow mountain cur m
6 Weeks

she is stubran and doesnt listen she nibbles alot and is very hard to potty train and it seems like she is trying to mark her teritory in the house and i dont know how to dicapline her cause im concerned she will turn on someone

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Chico
German shepherd chow mix
8 Weeks
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Chico
German shepherd chow mix
8 Weeks

He has fleas and he acts very shy. My oldest Nubian got him yesterday and now I'm dog sitting. We also have a 1 1/2 pit bull that I want to learn how to care for properly too.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the first thing I would do is call the veterinarian for flea medicine. If the fleas get to your other dog, and in your house, you will need to eradicate the pests from the house or the flea problem will be perpetual. You cannot use any flea products on Chico without the vet's approval because he is so young. It could be dangerous. Take both dogs for a checkup to start off on the right foot. Then, they will be safe from parasites, worms, and fleas. The vet can explain how to clean the house as well, because flea eggs can get in cracks and hatch, and then start populating on the dog again. But don't worry it is solvable! The vet can also advise on vaccines, brands of food to buy, etc. To potty train Chico: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. All of the methods are good. And to start obedience: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit-and-stay. Make sure that you take both dogs to obedience classes because this will help socialize them with other dogs and people, too. Good luck and happy training!

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Snickers
Chow Chow
5 Months
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Snickers
Chow Chow
5 Months

Hi, I got my male chow about a week ago (he was almost 5 months). On walks he can be very stubborn and will only go where he wants or will just lay down somewhere. He doesn’t play with toys and rarely takes the treat that we give him. Almost all day he lays down in the same place and sleeps! We went to the vet and asked many people and they all say it’s stress. We got him from Europe and are taking him to the UK soon. All the traveling must be stressful but I think he should still be more enthusiastic and have more energy! I’ve seen YouTube videos and websites and they all say the same thing that doesn’t work! How do I get him to interact with me and my family? What should I do to get him to listen to me on walks? I really need a miracle training method! Please give me your advice.

Nikole

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jelena, First, pup probably needs time and patience. Right now, instead of focusing on trying to get him to be more energetic and learn lots of things keep, focus on keeping his atmosphere calm, patient, and pleasant. Its not unusual for it to take an older puppy a month to adapt. Also, be aware that part of it could be his personality too. He may not be a high energy dog since you have ruled out medical reasons. After a couple of weeks of being patient with him, keeping interactions calm, and your attitude confident and pleasant around him, then I suggest working on confidence building exercises like home-made agility obstacles. Chow Chows can be very independent by nature. For the walking, since he isn't motivated by food yet (that may chance once he relaxes more though), you can use what he wants as motivation (which is going back home). Pay attention to how far he will walk without resistance. Make a goal that is just a few feet past that. When he puts on the brakes, give short quick tugs on the leash (tugging and releasing tension, tugging and releasing, tugging and releasing) until he walks a couple of feet forward willingly. When he is moving again, praise him genuinely, then you be the one to turn home and end the walk. You want to teach him that the way to get back home is to cooperate with moving with you. When he will walk a bit further, then increase the distance a little more. At first the goal is simply to get him to go a few more feet than before willingly. Eventually by practicing this he should get used to following you in general and walk more normally. Also be aware though that this time of year, depending on where exactly you like, he may be hot and the pavement could be burning his paws - making him hate walking. Be sure to feel the pavement and pay attention to whether he is hot. If the heat is the issue, then getting him used to wearing dog hiking boots can help with the burning, and gently wetting him down before a walk, having him wear a cooling vest, or limiting the length of time outside during hot days can all help. Finally, if he continues to have issues and seems to feel bad, you may want to try gradually switching his food to something with different ingredients that is higher quality. Some dogs have food allergies or sensitive stomachs. Make the switch very gradually over a week or two to avoid stomach upset. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chi and Kai
Chow Chow
1 Year
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Chi and Kai
Chow Chow
1 Year

I don’t have question. Just a story. Get a treat when their young like 6 months or younger and put it near the top of their head. They should automatically go into a sit then say sit and give them the treat. I say good girl as well in a high pitch voice and rub them so they get that as a praise as well. Now at a year they both know sit and kind of lay down. You should do that so in case you need you put collar, harness or just check them out, you can.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello, What you are describing is also called lure-reward training, where you lure the dog into the position using a reward. That is wonderful that you have taught them that. You are right, they are very useful commands to teach and teaching them in those ways is one of the easiest and most fun ways to teach. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sasha
Chow Chow
19 Months
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Sasha
Chow Chow
19 Months

I am currently training my dog through petco she is a chow chow/ Labrador mix. We just started last week I know it hasn’t been long but I fell like she will need additional training. My dog listens to me the most! And not my boyfriend at all. What is a way to get her to listen to him and should I put her in a better training class

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
830 Dog owners recommended

Hello Uchenna, I recommend having him practice the obedience commands she is learning, with you and also with him at home - he can either attend the class with you to learn how or you can show him what you are learning if he is willing. For basic obedience, the class you are in may be fine, since basic obedience is mostly about just teaching pup what a command means and how to do that command in less distracting places (it depends a lot on the individual trainer how good the class is), but it would be worth pursing private or an intermediate obedience class for reliability around distractions after the basic class. An intermediate class will work on things like obedience through crowds, around other dogs, ect...In that case, look for a trainer who also does off-leash, advanced obedience, even if you aren't going to pursue that (which is the level after intermediate), because they may have a better understanding of how to teach intermediate obedience with future off-leash work in mind, and it shows that they may have a bit more experience as a trainer in general. Always check into their previous client referrals also. I also recommend the article I have linked below for your boyfriend: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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