How to Crate Train a Basset Hound Puppy

How to Crate Train a Basset Hound Puppy
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon4-8 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

Your Basset Hound puppy is a great dog to have in your apartment or in your home. He doesn't mind being alone during the day while you're gone but he will give you all kinds of puppy kisses, shaking those long ears with excitement, as soon as you come home to him. Your Basset Hound is super friendly and easy to care for. 

Starting from an early age, as a puppy, crate training your Basset Hound will help with separation anxiety. His crate will give him a safe place to be while you are away and a secure space to sleep at night, as well as a place to wait until it's time for love and attention. Crate training your Basset Hound will give you peace of mind knowing your home is safe from your puppy. Your puppy will be confined while you are away but this will be a space large enough for him with soft bedding, comforts of home, and toys for entertainment. In the years to come, your Basset Hound may still look to his crate for comfort when he needs it. 

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Defining Tasks

Crate training your Basset Hound puppy builds a foundation of puppy etiquette for your little guy so he understands where his place is when you are away from him and what he can do when he's on his own. Crate training requires lots of tender loving care when you and your puppy meet again--and lots of repetition. He’ll use rewards to build up his sense of safety and security while he is patiently waiting for you to come back to him. Crate training is ideal for house training your Basset Hound puppy, and it supplies a comfortable, secure area for your pup to sleep at night or during the day. Once your pooch is crate trained, he will likely go into his crate in his own to sleep or rest. 

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Getting Started

Your Basset Hound puppy will require a small to medium-sized crate. You don't want the crate to be too large as it will become overwhelming and your puppy may use one side for a potty if he has too much room. You want your crate to be big enough that your adult Basset Hound can stand up and turn around in it, but not much bigger than that. You will also want to fill your puppy’s crate with bedding and lots of toys for him to chew on while he is awake inside the crate. Treats to reward good behavior will be necessary, and you may want a leash to control your puppy when you release him from the crate so you can get him outside as quickly as possible to go potty instead of having him run away to use a spot in the house.

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The Lure Into Crate Method

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1

Set up the crate

Get your Basset Hound's crate ready with warm fluffy bedding and a few toys to keep him happy, chewing, and entertained while inside and awake.

2

Treat

Introduce the crate to your puppy. Give him a treat and lure him inside the crate with another treat. You can place the treat on his bedding or let him watch you toss it inside.

3

Soft voice

Using a soft voice and gentle tone, encourage your puppy to get into the crate or, if he made it into the crate with the treat lure, talk to him with an excited but soft voice.

4

Block the door

Do not close the crate door but sit in front of it, so your pup does not try to get out. Feel free to feed him a few treats while he is inside.

5

Short times

Keep the times you put your Basset Hound in the crate short and simple at first. If possible, try to stay nearby while crate training at first. If you have to leave the house, the crate is the safest place for your puppy. Just remember to take your pup to go potty after an appropriate time.

6

Sleeping times

Any time your Basset Hound is sleepy, put him in the crate. If you start this while he is still a puppy, he will eventually go into the crate on his own when he is sleepy. During the day, if you are home and see him sleeping elsewhere, place him in the crate. He should learn this is his safe place to go when he’s not playing or eating or socializing.

7

Awake times

If you need to place your Basset Hound puppy inside his crate while he’s awake, try to stay nearby for the first few times so he can build up confidence and know he is safe and secure and not left alone. When you have to leave, be sure he is safe and comfortable with toys for entertainment. These toys should be puppy safe. Be sure he goes potty before putting him in the crate.

The Safe Crate Method

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1

Introduce the crate

You’ll need to introduce the crate to your Basset Hound puppy. The earlier you can do this introduction, the better for you both. Remember, your Basset Hound will see this space as his own bedroom after training.

2

Best place

You’ll want to place the crate in a busy area within your home so when your Basset Hound puppy is in it, he knows you are near. If you want him to sleep in the crate at night as well, consider that spot in your placement or consider moving the crate or having two for your puppy if your house has a large space between his nighttime and daytime areas.

3

Getting inside

Before placing your Basset Hound puppy in the crate, have it all ready with a bed and blanket. Placing toys that are safe for your puppy is also a good idea. Talk with your Basset as you show him his new crate. Use some treat to coax him inside or place him inside. Let him sniff and get used to the space. Stay nearby and talk to him using words you want him to learn such as "crate" or "bed."

4

Encourage

Encourage your puppy to walk around the crate or lie down and chew on a toy. Offer him a small treat while he is inside. You want your little guy to be comfortable in the crate. Take him in the crate often and give him a treat anytime he goes in whether alone or with your assistance.

5

Naps

When your Basset Hound is sleepy, place him in the crate for sleep. He might whine, but if you can, try to stay nearby and talk with him or pet him as he falls asleep. You can also offer him a lovey toy, blanket, or a shirt you have worn recently so he can smell your scent. These things will provide him comfort.

6

Bedtime

Place your Basset Hound puppy in the crate at bedtime as you did during the day for naps. He will probably whine more at night than during the day, but again, stay close by, let him hear your voice, and give him comfort items like toys or blankets.

7

Potty time

Your Basset Hound puppy can only hold his bladder for about one hour for each month he has been alive. So your four-month-old Basset Hound can only hold it for about four hours. Expect to be taking him outside to go potty at least once during the night, if not more.

8

Leaving home

Keeping your Basset Hound’s potty training in mind, when you leave the house, place him in the crate with a treat and toys he can use for entertainment while you are away. When you arrive home, be sure to take him out of the crate and outside to go potty right away.

9

Rewards

Be sure to reward your Basset Hound each time he enters and leaves his crate. Over time, he will begin going into the crate on his own to nap and sleep. There may be a point where you no longer need to lock him in the crate, because he can be trusted on his own but will still want that as bedroom space for himself.

The Night Sleeping Method

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Placement

While night training your Basset Hound puppy, try to place the crate where your pup feels safe and where you can hear him when he whines.

2

Commands

Pick a command to say goodnight to your Basset hound puppy. This could be "good night" or "let’s go night-night." Anything you can say each night to tell your pup to go into his crate and go to bed for the night will work.

3

Treat

Place your Basset inside the crate. He should have bedding all prepared for him before going to bed. Give him a treat and tell him 'good night'. Try to stay close by while he falls asleep. He’ll feel safer and this will help build his confidence.

4

Constant whining

If your puppy constantly cries, you can open the door and give him a treat and talk with him for a moment but do not go to him more than once. Let him settle down with his lovies, toys, and bedding. If you can have a conversation with someone in the house or yourself, the sound of your voice may help him settle.

5

Go to bed

Your Basset Hound Puppy may take a bit of time the first few nights to fall asleep, but give him the time he needs with the security and comfort of you nearby to fall asleep. Go to bed and expect your puppy to whine a bit when the house is quiet or when he wakes.

6

Potty

Remember your puppy will need to go potty throughout the night for the first few months while he is crate training. He should be able to hold it for an hour for every month if his age, but expect to take him outside even if he wakes missing you.

7

Patience

Crate training won’t take long. He’ll be comfortable in the crate after a few weeks. Focus on good behaviors and reward any time in the crate with tasty treats.

By Stephanie Plummer

Published: 01/31/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Butters

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Basset Hound

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8 Weeks

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getting him to Potty on the Doggy pads, I take him outside when I can but I’m trying to train him to pee on the pads when I’m not home to take him out

Oct. 2, 2021

Butters's Owner

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Alisha Smith - Alisha S., Dog Trainer

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257 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use potty pads. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

Oct. 3, 2021

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Gunner

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Bully Bassett

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5 Months

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Gunner finally went 3 days without any potty accidents and we thought he was FINALLY trained. However, we were mistaken. He's right back to having "accidents" right in front of us. What should we do?

Nov. 22, 2019

Gunner's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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Hello Kimberely, Check out the crate training method from the article linked below. You need to stop the accidents through careful management the majority of the time for several weeks before good habits will become permanent. Stopping accidents means managing pup's confinement, freedom, and schedule in a way that prevents the accidents in the first place. The idea behind the method that I have linked below is to only give pup freedom in the home when his bladder is empty - any time he doesn't go potty outside or his bladder is filling back up again but it's not quite time to take him potty again yet, he needs to be in the crate right now. Don't feel bad about being firm with crate training. Being consistent and sticking to crate training diligently at the beginning can result in a dog who is trustworthy in the house for years. I have seen people try to give too much freedom at first and those are often the dogs who have to be crated as adults often because they developed bad habits that could have been prevented as puppies had they had more confinement and boundaries early on. It's a short period of extra boundaries to gain a long term relationship of trustworthiness and good habits. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Keep in mind it takes an average of 3 months to potty train a puppy if something consistent like crate training if followed. Don't give pup too much freedom too quickly or it will take even longer. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Nov. 22, 2019


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