How to Crate Train a Husky Puppy

Medium
1-2 Months
General

Introduction

Your Husky is a special breed. He likes to talk. He likes to scream. He likes to sing. So when it’s time to crate train your Husky, be aware that he will let you know the entire time he's in there exactly how he's feeling. He's okay. This is just his personality. 

If you are unfamiliar with crate training, now is the time to start with your Husky. A crate provides a safe place for your pup to go when you are not home, when he is tired, or during the night when it's time to sleep for several hours at a time. Crate training your Husky can save your home from damage he may cause when he misses you while you are away. Over time, as your Husky gets used to his crate he will see this as his personal safe haven. This will be his bedroom when he's sleepy during the day and needs a nap. This will be the place he goes when you are not home and he needs to be protected just as much as your belongings need to be protected.

Defining Tasks

When you crate train your Husky, you are teaching him boundaries. You will be teaching him where he will be during certain times during the day such as when you are away from the house. You can train your Husky at any age to begin to use the crate. However, the younger your Husky is, the easier this training will be and the more your Husky will view the crate as his personal space. You can decide to crate train your Husky only during the day, giving him free reign of the house during the night when you sleep, or you can crate train your Husky to only sleep in the crate or both. Eventually, you will notice your Husky going into the crate on his own when he feels sleepy or at bedtime, or when he just needs a break from the world.

Getting Started

Crate training is easy to do when you're well prepared. You will need a crate large enough for your Husky to stand up and turn around. There is no need to get a separate crate for a puppy and an adult. But you may consider blocking off some of the space in the crate while your Husky is a puppy, so your pup doesn't use the extra room as a potty. Be sure to have lots of soft, clean, comfortable bedding in the crate as well. Your Husky will want some entertainment while he's in the crate, so some new toys for him to chew on while you're away will help to keep him happy and entertained. You will also need some high-value treats to encourage him to go into the crate and remind him he's safe while he's training.

The Nighttime Sleep Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Place the crate
Be sure to put your Husky's crate in a place where he will be comfortable sleeping at night. You may want your Husky in or near your bedroom or in a quieter area of the house or even a popular family room area. Either way, be sure you can hear your Husky if he's a puppy and is still potty training.
Step
2
Play and potty
Take your Husky outside for one last trip to the potty. While he's out there, play with him for a few minutes and wear him out. It will be easier for your Husky to train for nighttime sleep in the crate if he goes to bed sleepy.
Step
3
Good night
Begin to use a command phrase such as "good night" to train your Husky when it is time to go into his crate for nighttime sleep.
Step
4
Treat
Give your Husky a treat and place one inside his crate, encouraging him to go inside to get it. His crate should be all set up with bedding, making it a comfortable place for him to sleep all night.
Step
5
Door
Once your Husky is inside the crate and settled comfortably, close the crate door. You may need to hang out for a few moments encouraging him with a soft voice to stay and go to sleep.
Step
6
Whining and crying
If your Husky cries after putting him in the crate, use a calm voice to tell him again to 'go night-night' or bid him good night. You can offer him one more treat before bed but eventually walk away and let him whine until he's asleep. You may want to stay close by so he knows you're near and still has that sense of security rather than thinking he has been left alone.
Step
7
Bedtime
If it all possible, put your Husky in his crate to go to bed when it's time for you to go to bed as well. This will mean your Husky knows the house is quiet and you are sleeping too. If your Husky's crate is in your bedroom he should know that you're nearby.
Step
8
Husky puppy
If your Husky is a puppy, try to remember he can only hold his bladder for about an hour for every month of his age. This means if your Husky is 3 months old he may wake two to three times during the night to go potty. He should whine and let you know he needs to go. When you let him out of his crate, carry him outside rather than letting him walk so he doesn't stop to go potty in the house. Outside of using the potty, let any other whining go with a simple treat and a wish for a good night sleep.
Step
9
Patience
Have patience as your Husky is getting used to the crate for nighttime sleep. When he wakes in the morning, let him out of the crate and take him outside to go potty right away. It's always a good idea to give him a reward when he wakes up as well. Over time, your Husky will get used to the crate and begin to go directly to the crate at night time for overnight sleep on his own.
Recommend training method?

The Relaxing Place Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Crate
Set up your Husky’s crate in a place where he can rest and sleep overnight. This could mean moving the crate at night or investing in two crates. If your Husky is older, you might just want the crate for night time sleeping. If he is younger, you may want it for daytime use while you are away.
Step
2
Soft and peaceful
Make the crate a nice place for your Husky to be. You’ll need soft bedding and some toys that are safe to chew on. If your goal is for night sleeping only, one soft toy might suffice so he is not awake entertaining himself too much.
Step
3
Treat inside
Place a treat inside the crate to encourage your Husky to get in. He might stay and sniff around or lie down on the bedding. He may also eat the treat and come right back out. If he lies down, give him another treat. If he comes back out, try again with encouraging words or a different high-value treat.
Step
4
Sit outside
While your Husky is getting used to the crate, sit outside blocking the doorway and talk to him. If he’s ready to play, he won’t be interested in staying inside too long. Bring him back after some play. If he’s sleepy, pat his bedding and encourage him to stay. Offer more treats if he’s lying down.
Step
5
Quiet
Once he’s settled down, quietly close the door and sit outside the crate. If he goes to sleep, walk away but stay close by in case he wakes.
Step
6
Timing
Pay attention to the clock the first few times your Husky is in the crate. If he is a puppy, he may need to go potty every few hours, even during the night hours. If he is getting used to the crate and is house trained, staying in too long might turn him away from wanting to be in the crate during times you need him to be, such as for night sleep or when you are at work or away.
Step
7
Potty
As soon as you take your Husky out of the crate for awake time or playtime, be sure to take him outside to go potty.
Step
8
Nighttime
Place your Husky in the crate at night for night sleeping. Try to wear him out a bit with some playtime before bed. If he needs to go potty during the night, take him but place him back. If he’s whining to whine, give him a treat during a quiet spell and then ignore him. He will get used to staying in the crate.
Step
9
Patience
Do not overuse the crate. Use it for times when you know you will be away from your home and cannot keep an eye on your Husky, during short moments you are home but worry about keeping your Husky unattended, such as during your shower, and at night time. Be patient with your Husky as he gets used to using the crate for those moments he is alone or sleepy.
Recommend training method?

The Workday Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Timing and location
If at all possible, try to crate train your Husky over the course of a day or two off of work or over a weekend. Place the crate in the area your Husky will be happy to be and an area where you are comfortable having your Husky while you are away from the house.
Step
2
Crate introduction
Introduce your Husky to his crate by placing a treat inside and encouraging him to step in to eat the treat. Be sure the crate is set up with soft bedding and some entertainment in the form of safe to toys while you are away during the day.
Step
3
First day
The first day you introduce your Husky to his new crate, leave the door open at first as he gets used to the space. Encourage him to go in the crate when he is sleepy after meals and after play time. Be sure to take your Husky out to go potty before he comes in to nap.
Step
4
Stay close by
Your Husky will want to know that he is safe and secure. He will find security knowing you are nearby. Over the course of the first day you will eventually begin to close the crate door but stay close so he can hear you and see you. If he's napping for a long time, keep the door closed but encourage him to stay inside with a treat.
Step
5
Second day
After your Husky has spent a day getting used to the crate and how it works, spend the second day putting him in the crate for short periods as you do simple tasks around the house. Only this time, close the door each time. So for instance, as you wash dishes put him in the crate and close the door. Keep these sessions fairly short before opening the door again.
Step
6
Naps
On the second day of your Husky crate training, when he takes naps be sure he's in the crate and for every nap he takes, keep the door closed for the entire nap. If he whines while still awake, offer him a treat but keep the door closed. Walk away, staying close by so he knows you are near and he is secure. Once he wakes, open the door and take him out to go potty.
Step
7
Alone
Once it's time for you to leave the house and leave your Husky alone, place him in the crate with the door closed. Always give him a treat for going into the crate and close the door. Be aware of how old your Husky is and how well has trained he is. You may need to come home or have someone let him out during the day to go potty.
Step
8
Coming home
Once you come home from the end of your workday or tasks out of the house, let your Husky out of his crate and give him a treat. Be sure to take him out to go potty right away so he doesn't have any accidents in your house after being in the crate for some time.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 02/06/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Kobee
Husky
8 Weeks
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Question
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Kobee
Husky
8 Weeks

I am trying to train my husky puppy to sleep in his crate overnight, and the first two nights he slept completely fine waking up a couple times to go potty. Now he does not just whimper but instead screams for a long period of time even after I have taken him out and put him back in the crate making it impossible for me to sleep. In order to get him to stop crying I put him in my bed with me and he will sleep the rest of the night without crying. Do you have any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Courtney, The answer here is not fun. You need to let him cry and ignore him. This is a normal puppy phase that usually lasts between three days and two weeks. By letting him out when he cries, he learns to only be more persistent and the training gets harder and takes longer. When he gets older his jaws will get stronger and he will be able to chew through things and potentially ingest dangerous pieces of things while free at night as you sleep - at that point you will probably end up having to crate him at night again but if he is used to sleeping in your bed it will be much harder then than it even is now. It's far easier to do it now and suffer through a few hard nights by ignoring non-potty cries. If you can, crate him in a separate room at night and use an audio baby monitor to listen for when he wakes up to go potty - he is probably crying at night for attention, knowing you are right there. Not being able to see you should help him give up sooner. Once he learns to sleep through the night consistently you can try moving him back into your bedroom in the crate if you want to (sleeping in another room long term is also good for him so either one is fine)...even putting the crate into a large walk-in closet or bathroom connected to your bedroom should help. Also, make sure when he really does have to go potty at night and you take him, you keep the trips super boring. No play, no treats. Take him on a leash so he doesn't get distracted and bring him back inside and put him into the crate right away afterwards, then ignore any crying. Make sure you stop giving him food and water two hours before bed. Make sure he is getting enough mental and physical stimulation through food stuffed chew toys, training, games, and walks during the day and is not sleeping all day, or especially all evening before bed. He will still need naps during the day but should have time to be awake and active mentally (mental stimulation is very tiring) and physically between naps. No long naps in the evening before bed though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zabedee
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks
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Zabedee
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks

Our puppy came home yesterday, he slept pretty well, till 4 am! He began howling after that and absolutely not sleepy at all. What do we do to help him learn 4 is not wake up time?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, When Zabedee woke up at 4 am did you take him outside to use the bathroom? At nine weeks waking up to pee is completely normal. Expect him to wake up at night for the next few weeks. Many puppies start to sleep through the night around four months of age, possibly sooner. The key is to teach him to only wake up if he needs to pee and not for other reasons, like playing or eating, and to teach him to go back to sleep when you return him to the crate after he pees outside. When you take him outside to pee, take him on a leash and calmly tell him to "Go Potty". When he goes, then take him straight back inside and put him back into the crate. If you are not crating him at night, then start by crate training him. You will not be able to get him to go back to sleep unless you do, if he is loose in your home. The crate will prevent him from chewing your things and hurting himself as he gets more rambunctious with age, and it will help with potty training. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method. I suggest crating dogs when you cannot supervise them until they are over one-year-old and show signs of being trustworthy when left alone. Crate training will lead to more freedom for the rest of his life because it will prevent bad long-term habits from developing as a puppy. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Also, make sure that he is not sleeping in the evening for long periods of time leading up to bedtime. If he goes to sleep at 7 pm (even if its in the middle of the den while people are moving about), then he will be fully rested by 4 am and ready for the day. At this age he will need short naps often, but try to keep him from sleeping for multiple hours during the evening until you are ready for him to go to bed - ten hours before you want him to wake up, by playing with him, training, and giving him something calm to do, like chewing a food-stuffed chew toy. Remove all food and water two hours before bed so that his bladder will be empty by the time he goes to bed. Finally, the crying is normal! The first two weeks of crate training and sleeping at night can involve a lot of crying. This is 100% normal. He is a baby and is still adjusting. He needs time to learn to self-soothe and self-entertain. Crate training can help that happen faster if you follow the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked above, or one of the methods from the article that I have linked below. Remain consistent with his schedule, don't let him out of the crate unless he needs to pee or he is being quiet, and give him time. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hi. I have a Siberian Husky he is seven months now however he’s always trying to wake up at 4 AM also to go potty at first he was on the 5:30 AM schedule but for some reason he’s always waking up at 4 AM I have tried to feed him at 7 PM now I am pushing the time back to 8:30 PM is it in a advice you can give that will help me because I have to get up at 5:30 to go to work so I like to feed him and take him out but getting up at 4 AM is on his time.I have tried feeding him first then taking him out to potty I have switched it and try to take him out to potty first and then feed him I have tried everything and sometime he still pooping in the crate he doesn’t go and poop after he eat he never did even when he was a baby any advice would help thanks in advance

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Elle
Husky
4 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Elle
Husky
4 Months

We've had our retriever/husky mix for a little over a week, and crate training has not gotten any easier. She used to whimper in the crate, but now she resorts to yelping and barking extremely loudly to get our attention. It's hard to tell whether she is barking because she has to use the bathroom or if she's just bored. When we take her out of the crate, we immediately take her outside to use the bathroom but she doesn't always go. She's especially unhappy when we place her in the crate while we eat dinner as well. I don't want to continue to take her out if she doesn't actually have to use the bathroom, since this will just encourage her yelping to get out when she's bored.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Genevieve, When you are home I suggest taking her potty every two hours. If she barks before it has been two hours since she last went potty and she has already pooped that day as well, you can ignore the barking. Also, in addition to ignoring the barking, reward her when she is quiet. Put her into the crate with a food stuffed Kong to help with her boredom. Leave the room and when she barks ignore her. When she stops barking for at least three seconds, return and sprinkle a few small treats or pieces of dog food into the crate, then leave again. Repeat going to her and sprinkling the treats when she gets quiet then leaving again. If she stays quiet after you leave, return in five minutes and sprinkle more treats, rather than waiting for her to bark first. When she starts to get quiet sooner, then wait a few seconds before going to her with treats. Gradually require her to stay quiet for longer before you reward her so that she is then being rewarded for staying quiet, rather than just barking and stopping. She should learn to prefer silence because that gets her more rewards, until it just becomes habit not to bark in the crate. While she is being quiet, let her out of the crate when it is time to; even if she is only quiet for a couple of seconds try to time your return during that brief window of her not barking. Taking her outside to go potty every two hours when you are home should prevent her needing to go potty sooner so that you can safely ignore boredom barking. In the crate she should be able to hold her bladder for a maximum of 4-4.5 hours at this age during the day, so 2 hours should be doable for her. You can add one hour to that time for every additional month of age she is, meaning when she is five months old, she can hold it for 5-5.5 hours, but only while in the crate or sleeping. She needs to be taken out more frequently while potty training still. If the barking continues after doing the above training for a month you can use a small canister of air, called a Pet Convincer, to correct it by spraying a small puff of air at her side, but she does not yet understand what she is supposed to be doing in the crate and is barking because she is bored and it the crate is new, so it's not time to correct yet, she needs to understand and be given time to adjust first. It normally takes puppies about two weeks of consistency with the crate for them to adjust. I would give it a full month before correcting though. Work on giving her a Kong stuffed with dog food and a little peanut butter and rewarding her calmly when she is quiet in the crate with treats. If she gets the food out of the Kong quickly, you can put her kibble into a bowl, cover it with water, and let it sit out until the kibble absorbs the water and turns into mush. Mix a little bit of peanut butter (Avoid Xylitol - it's toxic to dogs), or liver, or cheese into the kibble mush, then very loosely stuff a large Kong with it and freeze the stuffed Kong. You can make several of these at once and freeze all of them so that you can simply grab one from the freezer as needed. You can feed her her meals this way too, just adjust how much kibble you are giving her at other times during the day. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Balti
Chow Chow
10 Weeks
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Balti
Chow Chow
10 Weeks

I'm trying to crate train my chow mix but it is clear he prefers laying on the cold tile floor is there a crate bed that'll be more enticing than a cold floor? Or do I simply use treats to get him into the crate at the appropriate nap times (when I'm away at work) and bed time?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ramon, Check out www.primopads.com Primopads have a cool vinyl cover (which also makes them good for potty training because they aren't absorbent, and for chewing puppies because they are more durable). They provide a firmer foam pad support, which is less cushy but good for joints. I also suggest using treats as well simply to make the crate a more pleasant place for him. You can stuff a hollow chew toy with his food as a special crate treat to help him learn to self-sooth and self-entertain in the crate as well - doing this can help prevent barking, separation anxiety, and destructive chewing, since it encourages pup to chew his own toys. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jasper
Husky
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Jasper
Husky
10 Weeks

I have a male husky puppy named jasper. During the day he hangs out in the backyard (supervised) then at night we play with him in the garage. He has his huge bed in there and like to sleep on it during the day.(its too big to be in the crate plus he pees in the crate) The struggle is when I want him to sleep in the crate over night. He HATES it. Ive put his favorite toys in there, given him treats while hes in there and even put his kong toy. Nothing works. He wont go in there on his own I have to put him in and close the gate right away. Hes super stubborn and will cry and howl for 15 mins before sleeping. I ignore the crys. What should i do? Please help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brenda, Since he is only 10 weeks old and is going to sleep after 15 minutes of noise, you are actually doing pretty good! I know that may not sound encouraging to hear but it is normal for puppies to protest the crate during the first two weeks of crate training and some puppies protest it for hours - 15 minutes is a very average amount of time for this, so you are probably pretty normal right now. Most puppies don't learn to love the crate until they are older and calmer - he should learn to relax in it while young though. In general, he simply needs more time to get used to it. Keep doing what you are doing and ignoring the crying. You can help him adjust sooner by doing some training during the day too though. Follow the surprise method for an hour each day, during the day, but not right before bedtime. Since you don't want to give food at night or encourage him to stay awake at night- this needs to be done during the day, and simply ignore the crying at night. You can also use the other two methods found in the article I have linked below also, but if you want to use those, do them in addition to using the surprise method, not in place of it. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Finally, he may need more interaction with people during the day. It's great that you supervise him while he is outside - outside can be great, but also make sure that you are spending some intentional time with him, taking him places to socialize him (carry him before his 12 week shots while in public), have short 15 minute training sessions with him where you teach him new things, like Sit, Down, Come, and fun tricks - obedience is great but you also just want to stimulate him mentally and build a bond, and play fun games that build focus - like hide and seek, fetch, or round robin. You don't have to interact with him every minute of the day (most people couldn't anyway) but just make sure he is having his need for mental stimulation and bonding met to help him feel more secure. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Loki
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks
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Question
0 found helpful
Loki
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks

Hi, Our puppy is nearly 11 weeks old and we've seem to have nailed the night time after a couple of weeks, with a crate in the bedroom he goes in and after a couple of minutes of whimpering he goes to sleep for mostly all the night. The issues come when we need to leave the house - We have an identical crate downstairs (although not covered with a blanket as he pulls it through the gaps), toys, kongs, radio on but he howls nearly continuously until we return. He may have the odd 30 minute gap in between howls and crying but mostly its continuous. The most hes on his own is around 4 hours (wont ever be much more then that). How do we keep him quite whilst not at home, obviously welfare is a main concern but neighbours are becoming annoyed. Next week I will be able to walk him so a daily walk before anyone leaves will be a must but any other help would be appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ade, First, practice calmness surrounding the crate and building self-control. Practice Place command and the crate protocol from the videos linked below while home: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Next, purchase a vibration collar with several levels of vibration intensity. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the vibration button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this. The collar used in the video is stimulation but you can use the same protocol with vibration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right vibration level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the vibration button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, vibrate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being vibrated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. If he continues to ignore the collar, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your pup stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. While he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he needs her anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead, since he will need something other than howling to do at that point. If he cries while you are home, then you can also use a Pet Convincer to spray a small puff of air at his side through the crate wires (NOT at his face). When he is in the crate while you are home, every five minutes that he stays quiet, return to him and sprinkle a few pieces of dog food inside through the wires, without letting him out. As he improves, space your rewards further apart so that he has to stay quiet for longer and longer - until he is content with just the food stuff Kong. Also, leave the door to the crate open and randomly sprinkle treats inside and around the crate for him to find throughout the day - that will help him want to be near the crate on his own more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arya
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
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Question
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Arya
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

Hi!!
I would like to ask you for some advices to crate train my puppy, yesterday was the first day she slept in the crate and all night she was screaming, ALL NIGHT I just ignore her, I didn’t know what to do. Also I don’t know what amount of food should I give her? And at what time after she ate should I take her to potty!
Please I really need a lot of advices for crate train her. Thanks!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Luisa, Most puppies cry ALOT the first two weeks - usually the first three nights are really bad, then there are a couple weeks of just a few minutes of protest when you first put them in but they get quiet after that - If you don't let them out when they cry so they can learn how to settle down. You can give a food stuffed chew toy during the day and an empty durable chew toy at night. The exception to not letting them out of the crate is when they need to potty. At night your pup really will need to go potty 1-2 times at night for another month or two because of her small bladder at this age. If she has been awake for at least three hours, then she will need to be taken potty on a leash at that time - keep the trip super boring and on task- then put her straight back into the crate after she goes potty outside. Try to let her out of the crate to go potty when she is quiet for a second - it doesn't have to be long, but try to catch her in a quiet second if she has been crying for a long period of time (if this isn't possible then just do the best you can - you don't want an accident in the crate). If she falls asleep, then just take her outside when she wakes up and starts crying to be taken potty after at least 2.5-3 hours - which is what should happen once she adjusts to the crate - crying when first put in and when she needs to potty, but not in between. She will be able to hold her bladder for longer than 3 hours once she adjusts to the crate and stays asleep more, but may still need 1-2 potty trips every 5-6 hours or so if she wakes to pee, for a little longer. Keep those trips boring and calm too, then straight back into the crate - no playing or treats or she might start waking up to play too. Finally, follow the Surprise method from the article linked below to speed up crate training and help her become calmer and quieter sooner. Practicing during the day lets you use treats to reward calmness to help speed things up. Do NOT give food at night though or she will probably stay awake hoping for treats. Practice the Surprise method during the day several times a day, spacing out sessions if you are home, or for at least thirty-minutes in the evening and more often on the weekend if you work during the day. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Gary
Husky/Boxer Mix
3 Months
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Gary
Husky/Boxer Mix
3 Months

Hi there,

Our dog does great in the crate eating, sleeping, and just hanging out, but not so much when we leave for work. He eliminates in his crate every time we leave...It's early in our training process, but I am wondering if you have any tips and tricks to expedite the process? Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, know that at 3 months of age your pup cannot hold his bladder any longer than 4 hours during the day - if he is left in the crate for longer than that he will have no option but to eliminate in the crate. If he is eliminating in the crate within the first thirty-minutes of you leaving, the issue is more likely anxiety or the way you have the crate set up. Make sure that the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down, and stand up - too big and it won't encourage his natural desire to keep a confined space clean and he will likely pee. If you have a wire crate and it's too big, you can purchase a wire crate divider to make a larger crate smaller by blocking off part of it - then you can adjust the size as he grows. Second, make sure there isn't anything absorbent in the crate. Remove any soft bedding, towels, or other absorbent things if there is. Check out something like www.primopads.com to use in the crate until he is fully potty trained and past the destructive chewing phases (which will likely increase again for a while around 6-8 months while jaws are developing. If the issue is anxiety, I suggest working on building pup's independence and giving pup a dog food stuffed hollow Kong when you leave to keep him occupied. You can let the dog food sit out in a bowl ahead of time, mix a little liver past or peanut butter (NO xylitol - it's toxic to dogs) into the dog food, loosely stuff the mixture into a couple of hollow Kongs, insert a straw through the entire Kong out both holes, then freeze them overnight. When you leave, give one of the Kongs from the freezer to pup. The next day you can give the second one, then re-make and freeze. You can also purchase additional Kongs to have ready. Independence building: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Distance Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Also, practice keeping departures and greetings super boring. Practice leaving for short periods and returning super often - 1, 5 or 10 minutes around the block, changing your leaving routine so pup isn't anticipating your departure for as long - giving them less time to become anxious beforehand and able to calm down easier, and when you get home, if pup can hold their bladder, ignore pup, leaving them in the crate for 5-10 minutes. When you free them, follow the crate manner's protocol above- keeping exits calm, then ignore pup for another 5 minutes (you can take pup potty during this time just limit interactions). You want to condition pup to feel like your arrivals and departures are no big deal. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Alaska
Siberian Husky
5 Months
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Alaska
Siberian Husky
5 Months

I recently just got a new puppy Named Odin, he is a male husky. I currently have my female Siberian Husky “Alaska” . Alaska has been having accidents in her crate every time I take the new puppy outside to potty. I take them out separately as every time I take them out together they get distracted and play around and don’t concentrate on using the restroom outside. Most of the time I take Alaska out to potty first and then Odin. I come back and see she had an accident in her crate or the living room in general even after I had recently tooken her out to potty. What do you recommend I do or what am I doing wrong as she used to not do this before getting Odin?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Osmara, First, I would try putting a doggie diaper on Alaska when you take pup out - some dogs do not like soiling in the diaper at first, until they get used to it, so it might discourage the pottying. Continue to take her potty outside first so that you know the issue isn't an actual need to pee. Second, set up a camera to spy on her when you are gone outside - is she excited, anxious, calm, ect...You will want to do a little detective work to figure out why the behavior is happening so that the underlying cause can be addressed also. If she is possessive of you or pup - respect needs to be addressed. If anxious being left - confidence needs to be build around being alone. If excited, she needs to be desensitized to you and pup doing something fun without her, ect... Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Axle
Husky
5 Months
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Axle
Husky
5 Months

They slept great in the crate together, not a peep all night. But went to let them out at 630AM and they won't come out of the crate. How can i entice them out? Treats arent working, do i let them come out on their own?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ellen, For the moment I would let them come out on their own, but during the day practice going in and out of the crate one pup at a time. Use the method from the video below but also give pup a treat after they exit and when they first enter, saying a command each time - like "Crate" for entering and "free" for exiting. Once pups can go in and out on command individually, attach a leash to each pup and practice with pups together, guiding them out with the leashes if they refuse the command. Practice this intentionally during the day so mornings will be easier. https://youtu.be/mn5HTiryZN8 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koda
Siberian Husky
his two months old
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Koda
Siberian Husky
his two months old

Trying to get my dog used to night time but his constantly howling and screaming upsetting the neighbors when in his cage at night, his left alone with a blanket smelling of me no lights and a cover over the cage downstairs , please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Georgina, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. Practice that method very often during the day, giving breaks between crating sessions - but only give treats during the day and not night - since you want pup to sleep at night. Know that at 8 weeks old, pup will need to go potty 1-2 times at night. When pup wakes after at least 2.5 hours since their last potty trip and cries - take pup potty, but don't wake them up if they don't wake on their own unless they are having accidents when you don't Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate . Once a pup is awake, they will have to go potty if it's been at least 2.5 hours, but if pup stays asleep they can usually go longer, since the bladder functions differently while asleep than awake. When you take pup potty, take pup on a leash, keep the trip super boring - no treats, no play, little talk, then immediately put pup back to bed in the crate. Ignore any crying that happens at times other than 2.5 hours or more since the last potty trip - including the crying right after putting pup back into the crate after they potty outside. The first three nights are usually the worst! - if you are strict about ignoring it, it will usually start to improve by night four, but there may still be some amount of initial crying for up to two weeks. Staying strict with crate training tends to end the crying soonest though - inconsistency prolongs it and encourages pup to protest harder. Having pup in your room is fine, but if pup being in a bathroom, master closet, or other room helps the neighbors be less disturbed during the crate training process, you can definitely move the crate to another location. Since pup will need to go potty, if you move the crate, you will simply need to purchase an audio baby monitor and set that up so that once pup finally falls asleep and you go to bed, you can turn the monitor on and listen out while sleeping, and hear pup when they wake during the night asking to go potty - then take them outside. You can turn the monitor off again once you are responding to pup to minimize noise disturbance. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Waylan
Husky retriever mix
5 Months
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Waylan
Husky retriever mix
5 Months

We adopted Waylan at 8 weeks. When we first brought him home we tried crate training and he would go into distress. We later found out that his litter had been rejected by their mother. Waylan goes from being a sweet loving little pup to growling and snapping when being petted and we have learned not to touch him when he is sleeping. Unfortunately two weeks ago while camping my husband and Waylan were attacked by two pit bulls. Waylan was severely injured but is healing. He is up most of the night because he is not getting the exercise he needs, but will not stay in his crate. If we try to put him in the crate he becomes aggressive and then just trembles. Any suggestions on helping this pup?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the photo. So sorry to hear that Waylan had to go through this trauma. The first thing I would do is contact the vet to let them know about the snapping when touched. Could be that he is still in pain and needs additional medication, or perhaps has another injury that you are not aware of. Buy him several interactive toys, such as a puzzle feeder that will give him some mental stimulation. Rather than using the crate, because of the fear right now, why not set up an exercise pen area? Then Waylan is contained when you need him to be but not confined to the crate. The crate will still be there for him to use when he wants to, but won't be forced. Here is a great article on exercise pens: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. You will have to be aware that Waylan may now develop a fear of dogs - it's hard to say - but please socialize him as much as you can. If you have a friend with an older, calm dog, that would be a start. You can also contact a behavior specialist in your area for help. Take a look at this website for video advice and the opportunity to speak directly to a trainer. https://robertcabral.com/. All the best.

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Ghost
Husky
5 Months
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Ghost
Husky
5 Months

Is it better to get him a crate or a kennel to get him trained to sleep there and not whine while I’m not home.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you have a couple of options. You can use the crate or an exercise pen. Both work well - the key is to make sure that the crate or pen is a positive place. Take a look at the guide here for tips on how to encourage Ghost to get used to a crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. As for the exercise pen, here is an article on how to set one up. This is a good option as well. https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Many owners will give their dogs a Kong before leaving for an extended time out. Fill a Kong with moistened kibble and a smear of dog-safe peanut butter (no xylitol as it is toxic to dogs!). Freeze the Kong overnight. When you are ready to go out, give Ghost the Kong in the crate/pen for a long-lasting treat that keeps him busy and also associates you going out with a tasty treat. Good luck!

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Trumun
Alaskan Husky
2 Years
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Trumun
Alaskan Husky
2 Years

Getting him to sleep on his own in a crate downstairs

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Bruno
Siberian Husky
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Bruno
Siberian Husky
7 Weeks

Crate train and being away for work

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Piper
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks
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Piper
Siberian Husky
10 Weeks

I need to house break her and crate train her

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi! I am going to send you information on both potty training and crate training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Nova
Siberian Husky
1 Year
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Nova
Siberian Husky
1 Year

I can’t get her to stop going potty in the house . During the day she is fine but at night she is fine until about 4:30 then we let her out and I let her out again around 7. But in between 7 and 9 she goes potty in the house .

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

I am sending you information on potty training as well as crate training. There is a lot of information, but it should help you with this process. The information below is geared towards puppies, but that is ideal because when adult dogs have potty training issues, it is best to start over as if they were puppies. A clean start and a few weeks of consistency should be all you need to get the potty training under control. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Kaí
Husky
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Kaí
Husky
9 Weeks

I’m trying to crate train him but I haven’t found any good treats to get him exited. He cries a lot and it’s difficult training him because due to the loud cries he won’t let my neighbors sleep and I’m scared of complains. How can i speed the process?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on crate training. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Freya
Siberian Husky
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Freya
Siberian Husky
7 Weeks

She cries often in the crate, even after I encourage her in with a treat and give her a few scratches to calm her down. I know it is normal for huskies to cry and sing more often than other breeds, so maybe I just need to get her more used to it. Also, potty training seems to be a bit trickier. I’ve owned huskies before, it has just been a few years. Any tips? Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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LUNA
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks
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LUNA
Siberian Husky
9 Weeks

I tried crating her at night. She goes crazy. She usually ends up pooping herself and then after being cleaned and put back still bangs, chews and attacks the crate. She even hurt herself as I found blood on the side of the crate tonight. I've given toys treats etc un there. She naps there now since I've been picking her up during naps and carrying her there til she decides to stay and nap there. But once the door closes, she goes insane.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like there may be some separation anxiety going on. Because this behavior issue is complex, I have a lot of information to send you. With some time and practice, this is something that can be turned around over the next month or so. The first step in treating separation anxiety is to break the cycle of anxiety. Every time a dog with separation anxiety becomes anxious when their owner leaves, the distress they feel is reinforced until they become absolutely frantic any time they are left alone. Owners should give the dog an acceptable item to chew, such as a long lasting food treat when they go out. The goal is to have the dog associate this special treat with the owner’s departure. Treats might include hollow bones stuffed with peanut butter or soft cheese, drilled out nylon bones, or hollow rubber chew toys such as Kong toys with similar enhancements (place these in the freezer before giving them to your dog to make them last longer). Give the bone to your dog about 15 minutes before preparing to depart. The chew toy should be used only as a reward to offset the anxiety triggered by your departure. Hiding a variety of these delectable food treats throughout the house may occupy the dog so that the owner’s departure is less stressful. In an effort to prevent destructive behavior, many owners confine their dog in a crate or behind a gate. For dogs that display “barrier frustration,” the use of a crate in this way is counterproductive. Many dogs will physically injure themselves while attempting to escape such confinement. Careful efforts to desensitize and counter condition the dog to crate confinement before leaving them alone may be helpful in some cases. However, some dogs rebel against any form of restraint, including restricting barriers and, for them, crate training may never be a positive experience. Crate training and utilizing the crate while people are home can be a positive way to make the crate a safe place. If you utilize it when people are around, your dog won’t necessarily associate the crate with departure and being left alone. Creating nap time in the crate throughout the day can also be helpful. Building Independence Independence training can help fight separation anxiety and loneliness. Independence training can help build confidence and instill obedience. “Doggie Daycare” or hiring a pet sitter may be a better alternative for dogs that are initially resistant to treatment. It can be expensive, but prices vary. Independence training is one of the more important aspects of the program. It involves teaching your dog to “stand on their own four feet” when you are present, with the express intention that their newfound confidence will spill over into times when you are away. You need to make your dog more independent by reducing the bond between both of you to a more healthy level of involvement. Decreasing the bond is the hardest thing for owners to accept. Most people acquire dogs because they want a strong relationship with them. However, you have to accept that the anxiety your dog experiences in your absence is destructive. Essential components of the independence training program are as follows: Your dog can be with you, but the amount of interaction time should be reduced, especially where attention-seeking behaviors are concerned. You should initiate all interactions with your dog, and they shouldn’t be permitted to demand attention. If you give your dog attention every time they whine, it helps to foster the dog’s dependence on you and increases its anxiety in your absence. You should ignore your dog completely when they engage in attention-seeking behavior, and avoid catering to them when they appear to feel anxious. This means no eye contact, no pushing away, and no soothing talk or body language, all of which will reward their attention-seeking mission. Attention is encouraged only when your dog is sitting or lying calmly. The goal is not to ignore your dog, but to stop reinforcing attention-seeking behaviors so that your dog develops a sense of independence. Minimize the extent to which your dog follows you by teaching them to remain relaxed in one spot, such as their bed. To accomplish this, it is helpful if you train them to perform a sit-stay or down-stay while gradually increasing the time that they hold the command and remain at a distance from you. Providing a treat or toy and encouraging individual play time can be helpful. Once your dog has learned basic obedience commands, you can train them to hold long down-stays while you move progressively farther away. First, your dog should be trained to perform a “down-stay” on a mat or dog bed using a specific command, such as “lie down.” Your dog may have to be gently escorted to the designated spot the first few times. Initially, they should be rewarded every 10 seconds for remaining there, then every 20 seconds, 30 seconds, and so on. Once they have figured out what is wanted, you should switch to an intermittent schedule of reinforcement [reward], as this will strengthen the learned response. Each time your dog breaks their “stay,” issue a verbal correction, indicating that there will be no reward, and then escort them back to their bed. First, your dog can be made to “down-stay” while you are in the room. Next, they can be asked to stay when you are outside of the room, but nearby. The distance and time you are away from your dog can be increased progressively until your dog can remain in a down-stay for 20 to 30 minutes in your absence. Your dog should be warmly praised for compliance. Of course, they need to accept the praise without breaking the stay. Your dog should become accustomed to being separated from you when you are home for varying lengths of time and at different times of day. You can set up child gates to deny your dog access into the room you’re occupying (i.e. reading, watching television, or cooking). Instruct your dog to lie down and stay on a dog bed outside the room. As previously mentioned, you can provide an extended-release food treat or toy to keep your dog calm and distracted. Once they are able to tolerate being separated from you by a child gate, you can graduate to shutting the door to the room so your dog cannot see you. Allowing a dog to sleep in bed with the family can increase dependence. If you decide to prevent your dog from sleeping in your bed, there are some steps to take to establish this routine. First, you need to train your dog to sleep in their own bed on the floor in your bedroom. They may have to be taken to their bed several times before they get the message that you really want them to sleep in their own bed. Alternatively, you can train your dog to enjoy sleeping in a crate to prevent unwanted excursions. Do not use a crate if it causes more anxiety and distress for your dog. Once they tolerate sleeping in their own bed in your bedroom, you can move their bed outside of the bedroom and use a child gate or barrier to keep them out. Always remember to reward your dog with praise or a food treat for remaining in their bed. Develop Departure Techniques Many owners erroneously feel that if separation is so stressful, then they should spend more time with their dog before leaving. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the condition. Everyone in the family should ignore your dog for 15 to 20 minutes before leaving the house and for at least 10 to 20 minutes after returning home. Alternatively, your leaving can be made a highlight of your dog’s day by making it a “happy time” and the time at which they are fed. Departures should be quick and quiet. When departures (and returns) generate less anxiety (and excitement), your dog will begin to feel less tension in your absence. Remember to reward calm behavior. Teach your dog that your departure and return are just normal parts of the day and are not times to be stressed. You should attempt to randomize the cues indicating that you are preparing to leave. Changing the cues may take some trial and error. Some cues mean nothing to a dog, while others trigger anxiety. Make a list of the things you normally do before leaving for the day (and anxiety occurs) and the things done before a short time out (and no anxiety occurs).Then mix up the cues. For example, if your dog is fine when you go downstairs to do the laundry, you can try taking the laundry basket with you when you leave for work. If your dog becomes anxious when you pick up your keys or put on a coat, you should practice these things when you are not really leaving. You can, for example, stand up, put on a coat or pick up your car keys during television commercials, and then sit down again. You can also open and shut doors while you are home when you do not intend to leave. Entering and exiting through various doors when leaving and returning can also mix up cues for your dog. When you are actually leaving, you should try not to give any cues to this effect. Leave your coat in the car and put your keys in the ignition well before leaving. It is important to randomize all the cues indicating departure (clothing, physical and vocal signals, interactions with family members, other pets, and so on). The planned departure technique can be very effective for some dogs. This program is recommended only under special circumstances because it requires that you never leave your dog alone during the entire retraining period, which can be weeks or months. Timing is everything when implementing this program. If your dog shows signs of anxiety (pacing, panting, barking excessively) the instant you walk out of the door, you should stand outside the door and wait until your dog is quiet for three seconds. Then go back inside quickly and reward your dog for being calm. If you return WHEN your dog is anxious, this reinforces your dog’s tendency to display the behavior, because it has the desired effect of reuniting the “pack” members. The goal is for your dog to connect being calm and relaxed with your return. Gradually work up to slightly longer departures 5 to 10 minutes as long as your dog remains quiet, and continue in this fashion. Eventually, you should be able to leave for the day without your dog becoming anxious when you depart. When performed correctly, this program can be very helpful in resolving separation anxiety. Other Treatment Options Obedience Training Obedience training helps to instill confidence and independence in your dog. You should spend 5 to 10 minutes daily training your dog to obey one-word commands. It may be helpful to have training sessions occur in the room where your dog will be left when you are gone. All positive experiences (food, toys, sleep, training, and attention) should be associated with this area of the home. Exercise Your dog should receive 15 to 20 minutes of sustained aerobic exercise once, preferably twice, per day. It is often helpful to exercise your dog before you leave for the day. Exercise helps to dissipate anxiety and provides constructive interaction between you and your dog. It is best to allow your dog 15 to 20 minutes to calm down before you depart. Fetching a ball is good exercise, as is going for a brisk walk or run with your dog on a leash. Even if your dog has a large yard to run in all day, the aerobic exercise will be beneficial since most dogs will not tire themselves if left to their own devices. This is incredibly helpful in dogs that are working breeds that need a job to expend energy and work their brains. Supplements Recently, supplements have been released to the public that can help dogs with anxiety. Purina created a probiotic that has been shown to reduce anxiety and provide a calming effect on some dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this product for treating anxiety, or other products that contain L-Theanine or L-tryptophan.

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Kobi
Huskita
10 Weeks
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Kobi
Huskita
10 Weeks

He is very aggressive and bites a lot. I feel he never listens to me n infact wheb he pees and i try to correct him, he jumps back at mr.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Nakia
German Shepherd Husky Mix
8 Months
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Nakia
German Shepherd Husky Mix
8 Months

Hello! Our puppy, Nakia, is having trouble staying home alone for a couple of hours while my girlfriend and I are at work. We tried putting her in a crate, but she howls. We tried again with a long lasting treat like peanut butter in a Kong toy, she eats it for 5 minutes before howling nonstop. We’ve even tried making sure nothing is out for her to get into and letting her room the house. However, she still seems to find something to chew up that she not supposed chew. We’ve tried giving her dog CBD and dog melatonin after she’s tired playing at the park. Nothing is working. We live in a duplex and don’t want to irritate our friendly and understanding neighbor. She doesn’t sleep in her crate at night. She sleeps on her bed in our room. During the day if she takes a nap, we put her in her crate next to us while we watch tv or do chores and she sleeps. The goal is to have her be a “normal dog” where we can just leave and she can roam the house freely without needing to constantly watch the in-home camera. Any advice??
Thank you for your time and looking forward to hearing back from you.

-Andrew & Darian

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Andrew and Darian, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Once pup is doing well with you in the house in another room, use a camera to spy on pup from outside. Start going outside where pup can't see or hear you. When pup barks, return to quietly correct then go back outside again. When pup gets quiet and stays quiet, initially for a couple of minutes, gradually working up to longer periods, then return to sprinkle in treats then leave again. After 30 minutes of practice, gradually working up to three hours, return when pup is quiet, ignore pup in the crate for 10 minutes until they are waiting calmly while go about your business in the home (correct if pup gets really loud and isn't settling down on their own). When pup is being patient and quiet in the crate, let pup out calmly. If pup tries to rush the door, close it again, making pup wait. Practice this until pup is waiting inside with the crate door open. At that point, happily tell pup "Okay" and let them come out calmly. You want to set that expectation of staying calm as they exit, so they don't get into the habit of getting anxious and excited in anticipation of being let out. As pup improves when you are outside, work that time up until you have worked up to you being outside for three hours and pup staying quiet the whole time. At that point, you can give pup a dog food stuffed chew toy in the crate. They will probably enjoy it once they are calm enough to focus on that for entertainment. As far as pup having free range of the home, right now you are still in the second chewing phase, related to jaw development. Because of that, I generally recommend waiting until pup is between 12-18 months and hasn't chewed anything they shouldn't while you are home for three months, before testing if pup is ready. Keeping pup crated until that time makes it far more likely pup will be able to be uncrated later, since you are avoiding letting pup get into the habit of chewing things they shouldn't without you there to interrupt. When you do feel pup is ready age-wise and behavior-wise, you can test it by leaving pup out of the crate while you go for a ten minute walk. When you get home, inspect the home or spy on pup with a camera while gone, and see if they had any accidents and got into anything they shouldn't have. If they did well, you can increase that time by 5 minute increments, up to thirty minutes, then by thirty minute increments until pup is being left out of the crate the entire time you are gone. If pup has a chewing incident one of those times while working up to longer, go back to crating pup for another month, then you can try again in 1-2 months, repeating that cycle until pup is mature enough to be left out. Working on things like Leave It and general manners when you are home to prevent unwanted chewing at those times, can also help prepare pup for being out of the crate when you are gone later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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