How to Crate Train a Husky Puppy

How to Crate Train a Husky Puppy
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Time icon1-2 Months
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

Your Husky is a special breed. He likes to talk. He likes to scream. He likes to sing. So when it’s time to crate train your Husky, be aware that he will let you know the entire time he's in there exactly how he's feeling. He's okay. This is just his personality. 

If you are unfamiliar with crate training, now is the time to start with your Husky. A crate provides a safe place for your pup to go when you are not home, when he is tired, or during the night when it's time to sleep for several hours at a time. Crate training your Husky can save your home from damage he may cause when he misses you while you are away. Over time, as your Husky gets used to his crate he will see this as his personal safe haven. This will be his bedroom when he's sleepy during the day and needs a nap. This will be the place he goes when you are not home and he needs to be protected just as much as your belongings need to be protected.

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Defining Tasks

When you crate train your Husky, you are teaching him boundaries. You will be teaching him where he will be during certain times during the day such as when you are away from the house. You can train your Husky at any age to begin to use the crate. However, the younger your Husky is, the easier this training will be and the more your Husky will view the crate as his personal space. You can decide to crate train your Husky only during the day, giving him free reign of the house during the night when you sleep, or you can crate train your Husky to only sleep in the crate or both. Eventually, you will notice your Husky going into the crate on his own when he feels sleepy or at bedtime, or when he just needs a break from the world.

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Getting Started

Crate training is easy to do when you're well prepared. You will need a crate large enough for your Husky to stand up and turn around. There is no need to get a separate crate for a puppy and an adult. But you may consider blocking off some of the space in the crate while your Husky is a puppy, so your pup doesn't use the extra room as a potty. Be sure to have lots of soft, clean, comfortable bedding in the crate as well. Your Husky will want some entertainment while he's in the crate, so some new toys for him to chew on while you're away will help to keep him happy and entertained. You will also need some high-value treats to encourage him to go into the crate and remind him he's safe while he's training.

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The Nighttime Sleep Method

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Place the crate

Be sure to put your Husky's crate in a place where he will be comfortable sleeping at night. You may want your Husky in or near your bedroom or in a quieter area of the house or even a popular family room area. Either way, be sure you can hear your Husky if he's a puppy and is still potty training.

2

Play and potty

Take your Husky outside for one last trip to the potty. While he's out there, play with him for a few minutes and wear him out. It will be easier for your Husky to train for nighttime sleep in the crate if he goes to bed sleepy.

3

Good night

Begin to use a command phrase such as "good night" to train your Husky when it is time to go into his crate for nighttime sleep.

4

Treat

Give your Husky a treat and place one inside his crate, encouraging him to go inside to get it. His crate should be all set up with bedding, making it a comfortable place for him to sleep all night.

5

Door

Once your Husky is inside the crate and settled comfortably, close the crate door. You may need to hang out for a few moments encouraging him with a soft voice to stay and go to sleep.

6

Whining and crying

If your Husky cries after putting him in the crate, use a calm voice to tell him again to 'go night-night' or bid him good night. You can offer him one more treat before bed but eventually walk away and let him whine until he's asleep. You may want to stay close by so he knows you're near and still has that sense of security rather than thinking he has been left alone.

7

Bedtime

If it all possible, put your Husky in his crate to go to bed when it's time for you to go to bed as well. This will mean your Husky knows the house is quiet and you are sleeping too. If your Husky's crate is in your bedroom he should know that you're nearby.

8

Husky puppy

If your Husky is a puppy, try to remember he can only hold his bladder for about an hour for every month of his age. This means if your Husky is 3 months old he may wake two to three times during the night to go potty. He should whine and let you know he needs to go. When you let him out of his crate, carry him outside rather than letting him walk so he doesn't stop to go potty in the house. Outside of using the potty, let any other whining go with a simple treat and a wish for a good night sleep.

9

Patience

Have patience as your Husky is getting used to the crate for nighttime sleep. When he wakes in the morning, let him out of the crate and take him outside to go potty right away. It's always a good idea to give him a reward when he wakes up as well. Over time, your Husky will get used to the crate and begin to go directly to the crate at night time for overnight sleep on his own.

The Relaxing Place Method

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Crate

Set up your Husky’s crate in a place where he can rest and sleep overnight. This could mean moving the crate at night or investing in two crates. If your Husky is older, you might just want the crate for night time sleeping. If he is younger, you may want it for daytime use while you are away.

2

Soft and peaceful

Make the crate a nice place for your Husky to be. You’ll need soft bedding and some toys that are safe to chew on. If your goal is for night sleeping only, one soft toy might suffice so he is not awake entertaining himself too much.

3

Treat inside

Place a treat inside the crate to encourage your Husky to get in. He might stay and sniff around or lie down on the bedding. He may also eat the treat and come right back out. If he lies down, give him another treat. If he comes back out, try again with encouraging words or a different high-value treat.

4

Sit outside

While your Husky is getting used to the crate, sit outside blocking the doorway and talk to him. If he’s ready to play, he won’t be interested in staying inside too long. Bring him back after some play. If he’s sleepy, pat his bedding and encourage him to stay. Offer more treats if he’s lying down.

5

Quiet

Once he’s settled down, quietly close the door and sit outside the crate. If he goes to sleep, walk away but stay close by in case he wakes.

6

Timing

Pay attention to the clock the first few times your Husky is in the crate. If he is a puppy, he may need to go potty every few hours, even during the night hours. If he is getting used to the crate and is house trained, staying in too long might turn him away from wanting to be in the crate during times you need him to be, such as for night sleep or when you are at work or away.

7

Potty

As soon as you take your Husky out of the crate for awake time or playtime, be sure to take him outside to go potty.

8

Nighttime

Place your Husky in the crate at night for night sleeping. Try to wear him out a bit with some playtime before bed. If he needs to go potty during the night, take him but place him back. If he’s whining to whine, give him a treat during a quiet spell and then ignore him. He will get used to staying in the crate.

9

Patience

Do not overuse the crate. Use it for times when you know you will be away from your home and cannot keep an eye on your Husky, during short moments you are home but worry about keeping your Husky unattended, such as during your shower, and at night time. Be patient with your Husky as he gets used to using the crate for those moments he is alone or sleepy.

The Workday Method

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Timing and location

If at all possible, try to crate train your Husky over the course of a day or two off of work or over a weekend. Place the crate in the area your Husky will be happy to be and an area where you are comfortable having your Husky while you are away from the house.

2

Crate introduction

Introduce your Husky to his crate by placing a treat inside and encouraging him to step in to eat the treat. Be sure the crate is set up with soft bedding and some entertainment in the form of safe to toys while you are away during the day.

3

First day

The first day you introduce your Husky to his new crate, leave the door open at first as he gets used to the space. Encourage him to go in the crate when he is sleepy after meals and after play time. Be sure to take your Husky out to go potty before he comes in to nap.

4

Stay close by

Your Husky will want to know that he is safe and secure. He will find security knowing you are nearby. Over the course of the first day you will eventually begin to close the crate door but stay close so he can hear you and see you. If he's napping for a long time, keep the door closed but encourage him to stay inside with a treat.

5

Second day

After your Husky has spent a day getting used to the crate and how it works, spend the second day putting him in the crate for short periods as you do simple tasks around the house. Only this time, close the door each time. So for instance, as you wash dishes put him in the crate and close the door. Keep these sessions fairly short before opening the door again.

6

Naps

On the second day of your Husky crate training, when he takes naps be sure he's in the crate and for every nap he takes, keep the door closed for the entire nap. If he whines while still awake, offer him a treat but keep the door closed. Walk away, staying close by so he knows you are near and he is secure. Once he wakes, open the door and take him out to go potty.

7

Alone

Once it's time for you to leave the house and leave your Husky alone, place him in the crate with the door closed. Always give him a treat for going into the crate and close the door. Be aware of how old your Husky is and how well has trained he is. You may need to come home or have someone let him out during the day to go potty.

8

Coming home

Once you come home from the end of your workday or tasks out of the house, let your Husky out of his crate and give him a treat. Be sure to take him out to go potty right away so he doesn't have any accidents in your house after being in the crate for some time.

By Stephanie Plummer

Published: 02/06/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Kobe

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Siberian Husky

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Ten Months

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Question

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He is good and doesn't mind sleeping in the cage at night. But he will not go in there himself unless there is a treat, also if we get to close to the cage he will bark and put his paw on the door as in asking us to get out. Only time he doesn't do this is when he is very tired. How do we get him to like the cage? We have plenty of toys inside the cage, there is no bedding though because he likes the cold of the plastic in the cage, also it is big enough for him.

Sept. 9, 2022

Kobe's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, know that what you described is a normal response with to the crate for many dogs. Second, check out the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help him adjust and learn to also be quiet and settle better in the crate. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate In your case, ignore the small caption in the title of the article. The training in the Surprise method should apply to a large dog too. Have a wonderful day! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Sept. 9, 2022

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Lily

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Siberian Husky

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9 Weeks

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My wife and I got a husky puppy on June 8th. She's bonding with us really well. We want to crate train her, but also don't want to give her access to the house so we've built a pen around the crate in the living room. She sleeps happily (in pen or crate) when she's tired, but whines tirelessly when she wants to be let out. We tried to wait it out one time and it went on for 40 minutes before we just had to take her out. Would it be better to dispense with the pen? We're also sleeping in the room with her because she whines the moment we leave the room.

July 12, 2022

Lily's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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Hello Daniel, I wouldn't give up yet. Its normal to have a lot of crying when pup can't be with you or is confined the first couple of weeks. Almost all puppies will do that, and some will do it a lot! Know that it's normal and its worth it to persist with the training. At the same time, I would also practice the Surprise method to help pup learn how to settle as soon as possible. Check out the Surprise method from the article I have linked below. This method can be done with pup in the crate but also when pup is confined in the pen part, or you are simply out of the room with pup behind a baby gate in a dog proofed room - any time pup is separate from you or confined. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

July 12, 2022


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