How to Crate Train a Shih Tzu Puppy at Night

Medium
1-3 Months
General

Introduction

Your spunky little Shih Tzu puppy is going to have lots of playful energy and be incredibly affectionate towards you and your family. A Shih Tzu is a great companion devoted to pleasing you. He will want to feel secure and comfortable, so crate training him for nighttime sleep is the perfect way to build his security as well as keep your house safe from the adventures of a bored puppy. 

Night time crate training gives your Shih Tzu puppy a comfortable, safe place to sleep all night long for the years to come. When you crate train your puppy for nighttime sleep, you are teaching him to go into his personal bedroom space when it's time to go to bed. Your Shih Tzu will begin to see his little crate as his personal space and might even start going into his crate during the day when he's tired and nap.

Defining Tasks

Your Shih Tzu puppy will need a little extra time learning to sleep in the crate all night because, as a puppy, he's going to need to visit outside a few times during the night. Try to remember when your training your Shih Tzu puppy to sleep in the crate at night, he can hold his bladder for just about an hour for every month of his age. So if you are training your three-month-old Shih Tzu puppy, he might need to go potty every three to four hours, even in the middle of the night. Crate training a Shih Tzu puppy takes time and patience, but by the time your Shih Tzu puppy is potty trained, he will also have the understanding that his crate is a place for him to sleep with comfortable bedding every night when it's time to go to bed.

Getting Started

To prepare for crate training a Shih Tzu puppy at night you're going to need a small crate. Your puppy’s crate should be large enough for your adult Shih Tzu dog to stand up and turn around. Don't make it too large of a crate, as it will give him room to go potty. Be sure to fill the crate with lots of soft, comfortable bedding, a dog bed or blankets work just fine, and some safe chew toys for your Shih Tzu to chew on while he waits patiently awake for you to let him out of his crate. While your Shih Tzu is potty training, be prepared to let him out for those moments. Also, be sure to have lots of tasty treats on hand for night training your Shih Tzu puppy.

The Night Commands Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Tire out
Where your Shih Tzu puppy out before bedtime. This might mean extra play time so he is nice and tired once it's time for him to go into his crate to go to bed.
Step
2
Potty command
Teach your Shih Tzu puppy a potty command such as 'let's go potty' and take him outside to go potty just before you take him into his crate to go to bed.
Step
3
Bedtime command
Give you Shih Tzu puppy a bedtime command such as 'let's go to bed' and place him in his crate
Step
4
Treat
Condition your Shih Tzu puppy to go to bed by using the command and offering him a treat as you place himin his crate. Once he is in his crate with his treat, give him some time with the door closed to settle down.
Step
5
Whining
Your Shih Tzu puppy wants to be with you, so he will probably whine a bit. Leave him alone and let it go. He will eventually settle down and go to sleep.
Step
6
Night waking
Your Shih Tzu puppy is still potty training, so he will probably wake up at least once or twice during the night to go potty. When he wakes to go potty take him outside and give him a reward once he goes potty.
Step
7
Back in crate
Immediately place him back in the crate and give him the good night command again.
Step
8
Sleep
Your puppy should sleep for the rest of the night. Ignore his whines as he's falling back asleep.
Step
9
Morning
As soon as your Shih Tzu puppy wakes up for the morning, give him a reward and take him outside to go potty.
Step
10
Practice
Practice this every single night with your Shih Tzu puppy. It will take some time, but eventually, when you use the command, he will go into his crate to go to sleep. With growth and practice, he will also stay there all night without having to go potty in the middle of the night.
Recommend training method?

The Day Start Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Crate placement
Place your Shih Tzu's crate in a busy part of the house during the day. This should be a small crate, so if you want to move it for night time sleep, it shouldn't be very difficult to do.
Step
2
Naps
Start placing your Shih Tzu In his crate during the day when he is sleeping. Anytime your pup looks tired or falls asleep somewhere, lift him up and place him in his crate.
Step
3
After exercise
Anytime your Shih Tzu plays with you indoors or outdoors, take him out to go potty and then place him in his crate. You can leave the door open for afternoon naps, especially if your puppy is still awake when you put him in the crate. If he's worn out he will settle down in his nice, soft bedding and go to sleep.
Step
4
After meals
Schedule your Shih Tzu puppy’s meals, and after each meal take him outside to go potty and then place him in the crate for a nap. Again, you can leave the door open during this time. But if your Shih Tzu leaves the crate to go sleep somewhere else, be sure to pick him up and put him back in the crate for any naps.
Step
5
Nighttime Introduction
After spending even one day taking all naps in his crate, your Shih Tzu should be fairly used to the crate as a soft, warm, comfortable, safe, and secure place to sleep. When it is time for your Shih Tzu to go to bed, place him in the crate, close the door, and head to bed yourself.
Step
6
Not sleeping
If your Shih Tzu is not sleeping during the day, open the crate and let him out during the day as he wishes. If your Shih Tzu is not sleeping at night, ignore him and let him take the time he needs to settle down and fall asleep. Don't forget while your puppy is potty training, he will need to go out during the night to go potty until he's old enough to hold it all night.
Recommend training method?

The All Night Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Crate
Set up a crate in a place you would like your Shih Tzu puppy to sleep at night. The crate should have soft, comfortable bedding and should be only large enough for your Shih Tzu to stand up and turn around.
Step
2
Potty outside
Take your Shih Tzu puppy outside to go potty before bedtime.
Step
3
Playtime
Spend a few extra minutes every night playing with your Shih Tzu puppy to wear him out of any excess energy he may have.
Step
4
Good night, puppy
Put your Shih Tzu puppy inside his crate and close the door. With the door closed, you can give him a small treat and wait for him to settle down.
Step
5
Walk away
Walk away from your Shih Tzu puppy giving him a chance to go to sleep on his own. Ignore any whining you may hear. Your pup will be pretty adamant he does not want to be in the crate, but in order to crate train him to stay in the crate all night, you will need to give him time to settle on his own.
Step
6
Sleep
Once your Shih Tzu puppy is asleep, it might be a good time for you to get some nighttime sleep as well.
Step
7
Waking
While your Shih Tzu puppy is still house training, he will need to go outside and go potty every few hours. This will mean for the first several months at least one to two times a night your pup may need to visit outside to go potty. These are the only times he should be waking at night.
Step
8
Rewards
Be sure to give your Shih Tzu puppy rewards for staying in the crate each time he is successful. Over time, he will stay in the crate longer and longer without whining and without waking until morning.
Step
9
Morning
When your Shih Tzu puppy wakes up for morning take him outside right away to go potty. Be sure you are also giving him a reward each morning once he wakes.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Poppa
Shih Tzu
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Poppa
Shih Tzu
7 Weeks

New puppy owner 7weeks need help keepin him in his crate fr bed.. is it ok he sleeps in bed a few to calm him

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is really a personal choice as to whether your dog sleeps in your bed, and to be honest, I have let dogs sleep in bed before, too. However, it can sometimes mean that you do not sleep as well. And there is always the chance that it will be hard to transition Poppa back to his own bed. But one step at a time - I always say do what feels right for you, while being safe. Poppa no doubt misses his mom and littermates. To help Poppa like the crate, there are great tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. The Surprise Method may be a good one. Read the entire guide through for suggestions. As well, when it is time for the crate, you can have it in your room so that Poppa feels secure. As well, have white noise (like a fan but not pointed at him) for noise. Remember, he may need a pee break in the night since his bladder is so tiny at this point. I hope these tips help and enjoy your puppy!

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Question
Kash
Shitzu
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kash
Shitzu
6 Weeks

He cries a lot when I put him in his crate

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! Below are some tips on crate training. Your pup is still pretty young and it may be a few more weeks until he is comfortable being alone all night. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Louie
Shih Tzu
16 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Louie
Shih Tzu
16 Weeks

Hello- since we have been in quarantine we haven’t had to leave Louie alone in his crate during the day. He has roamed all day everyday. He is great at night. We have formed a routine and he sleeps from about 10:45pm-8:00am. My question is do we train him to be in his crate during the day since he’s already 4 months old and if so, can you help with the best way to train him? I have read about distress crying and don’t want that to happen. Thanks!!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on crate training. Some of it will be remedial because your dog is already comfortable with the crate. So just power through the parts you know. The best way to do this though, is to approach the day time crate time as if it's a brand new thing. Because it will be to Louie! Dogs learn by association. He associates bed time with the crate. But that's about it. So it may take some time for him to be comfortable in it during the day and that is ok. Also, he is old enough that the whining and crying should be minimal. That is usually a young puppy thing and it is due to them simply being lonely and uncertain of their surroundings. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again.

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Question
Kajal
Shih Tzu
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kajal
Shih Tzu
8 Weeks

My shih tzu whines ALOT if i leave her in her crate. Also, if i leave her wandering freely in the room and lay down on my bed, she tries to climb up and keep whining until i go down with her. She is 600grams and so tiny that i am afraid that she would hurt her throat. What should i do to stop this behaviour?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! This is likely due to her age and it will subside with a little more time. Usually by 4 months, they become much more secure with their surroundings. But in the mean time, I will give you some tips about crate training. Some of it, you may know already, and some of it may sound remedial. But the key with crate training at a young age, is patience. Also, you do not have to worry about her damaging her throat with all of that whining. Puppies have fairly loud whines and wimpers for the first few months of their lives. It is part of their survival. Although I. am sure it isn't pleasant, try to ignore it as much as you can. If you know she is fed, has had water, is safe and secure, then you can do your best not to respond. By responding, she is learning that whining gets her what she wants, and that will become a habit. First off, the crate should be large enough that your pup can stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably. You don’t want one that’s too big, however, because the cozy size helps create a safe feeling for your dog as they are natural den animals. Also remember that until a dog is around 4 months of age, they can only hold their bladders for 1 hour per month old. So expect roughly 2 hours right now. That is after the last potty break, and no new intake of water. Also, dogs usually have to eliminate their bowels about 20 minutes after eating solid food. Those tips will help you figure out a schedule to begin the crate training. Below are some tips to get started: Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they doesn't associate crating with being left alone. All of these tips can be modified to fit your dynamic. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Question
Chloe
Shihpoo
13 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Chloe
Shihpoo
13 Weeks

Hi! We have had our puppy,Chloe, for about 5 weeks now. Crate training 2 times during the day (1-2 hours max) and at night. We are feeding meals in her crate, randomly putting her toys and small treats in there to find, her favorite blanket and toy at night, only associating the crate with positivity, correct small size, etc. and she is still struggling! We took her for a week-long overnight training and the trainer said she was sleeping from 11 PM - 6 AM, crying for a minute once in there before settling down, which we were so happy about! First night/week back and we seem to be back to where we were. Any tips or tricks we should try? At what age should we begin to see some positive changes and association with the crate? We understand she is still a baby and this takes time but there have been a few nights lately we have to physically move the crate into a different room because of the crying (not because she has to go potty) and we feel somewhat defeated! Thanks so much!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Based on what the trainer said, you know Chloe can do it. However, it sounds like she would rather be with you than in the crate and that is understandable. You are doing everything right. I would not move the crate back and forth, in and out of the room, though. You may have to put up with the crying for a few days to weeks before she gets the idea. Have you heard of dog appeasing pheromones? This room diffuser works naturally to calm a pup down. Ask Chloe's vet about it. I do want to point out that the trainer who gave the overnight training probably offers follow-up help (this is often a part of the overnight training fee). I would call the trainer and ask them for advice - they will be happy to give it. Good luck and enjoy little Chloe!

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Training Success Stories

Success
Pupsy
Shih Tzu
5 Weeks

Yet no any story but I need to say a big thank you 😊 I been research for two weeks now but this website just an amazing 😉 and helpful one ever 🙏 this really helped me for the night sleep as everyone in the house suggested something different any we all confused 😐 couldn’t now what to do but now with those beautiful and helpful advice we can settle down every thing thanks

1 year, 3 months ago
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