How to Train Your Big Dog to Get Along With a Small Dog

Medium
4-8 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Because big dogs can be intimidating, some small dogs might be a little fearful of your big guy. Big dogs also don't always know their size. Big dogs will try to fit into small spaces thinking that is their size, and big dogs will try to play the same way small dogs play, not truly understanding the size difference between the two. This could also mean your big dog plays a little rougher and your little guy could become injured or even stepped on. 

Training your big dog to get along with a small dog is imperative, especially if you have big and small dogs in your household. They should be able to get along. They should be friends. And hopefully, if you play your cards right, they should play together too.

Defining Tasks

Training your big dog to get along with your small dog will also include training your small dog to get along with your big dog. Some small dogs are definitely bigger than their bite and can stand on their own, but others are timid, shy, and fearful. This demeanor may encourage your big dog even more. Put these two dogs on the same level when you are training them both and work with them at the same time. Be sure to offer both a treat at the same time if possible. If you give one dog a treat, be sure to give the other dog a treat. This will teach the two dogs that they are both equal in the household.

Getting Started

You will need lots of tasty treats to train your dogs to play together and be nice to one another. You will also need patience and training time with a big dog and a small dog. If you don't own both big dogs and small dogs, but you still want them to get along, try to find a small dog that you can introduce your big guy to, so he knows that there are dogs of all sizes out in his world and he needs to know how to interact with them. You can do this by organizing play dates through your groomer or veterinarian, or you can take your dog to a dog park and see if anyone is interested in introducing their little guy to your big guy. Be sure to have treats for both dogs at all times.

The Distance Method

Most Recommended
6 Votes
Step
1
Introduction
When you need to introduce your big dog to a small dog, keep the introduction short and sweet and both dogs confined if it all possible. This could mean have you both dogs on leashes or it could mean having both dogs in crates with the crates side-by-side.
Step
2
Behavior
Pay attention to how both dogs behave during their introduction when they can't get to one another. Notice whether they are interested in one another or are aggressive and growling or barking at one another.
Step
3
Treats
Hold up two treats so both dogs can see. They should turn their attention from one another to you. Hand both dogs each a treat at the same time.
Step
4
Ignore
Ignore them once they both have treats. This will give them a moment to eat their treats and then decide what to do next. Do not look at them; just try to notice what they do once their treats are finished. Giving them time to eat the treats is giving them a moment to be distracted and to rethink how to address the problem at hand.
Step
5
What's next
After your dogs have eaten the treats and have looked at you for more, as they probably will do, they need to address each other again. They will either do this with curiosity after just having a tasty treat or they will turn and be aggressive.
Step
6
Treat again
If they are calm and curious about one another, you can look them both in the eyes and offer them each another treat. If they are aggressive, repeat the steps above where you hold up the treat without making eye contact and then hand one treat to each them wait a moment and then ignore them.
Step
7
Repeat and practice
Continue to repeat these steps until your dogs are no longer aggressive. Once they are curious and showing signs of leaning forward to sniff one another you can acknowledge both of them.
Step
8
Meeting
Once your dogs show very little interest in being aggressive with one another, you can have them meet one another by bringing their leashes closer and letting them explore and sniff, or by taking them out of their crates and letting them interact.
Step
9
Rewards
As long as they are getting along, continue to give them rewards in the form of treats as they explore and play together. If they are not getting along, separate them slightly so they can't fight. Then repeat the steps above.
Step
10
Practice
Once your big dog and the little dog are sharing the same spaces together, continue to practice these steps offering them rewards every time they show no interest in being aggressive or when you catch them sniffing and exploring or playing nicely. Rewards will remind them to get along so they can earn treats together.
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The Small Dog, Big Bite Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Aggressive
A small dog who is aggressive can actually intimidate a dog much larger than themselves. A large dog who is intimidated may very well run away or jump around, putting a small dog at risk.
Step
2
Get together
If your little guy is aggressive and you need to introduce a big dog into his world, socialize your little guy as much as you can away from the big dog. Start small by introducing your dog to dogs that are the same size. Keep them on leashes and meet in neutral territory, such as dog parks or even on a walk together. For the first several walks, keep your dog's playmate his size.
Step
3
Go up a size
While you are socializing your little dog with other dogs his size, search for dogs that are a bit bigger than him but not by much. So if you have a small breed, search for something in between small and medium-sized. Repeat socializing these two dogs together in situations where your dog is safe but understands he's a little bit smaller than his new walking buddy.
Step
4
Increase size
Keep repeating this process and socializing your little dog as much as you can away from the big dog. Continue to increase the size of the dog you socialize with your dog. To do this, find dogs at dog parks, talk to your friends, and find people who can go on walks with their dog and your dog together. Keep these social times short and only have one dog at a time playing with your little guy.
Step
5
Super size
Once you have gone through all of the different sized dogs, increasing in size each time while socializing your little guy, bring a big dog into your dog's world's in a social setting. Go for the same walks, go to the same dog parks, and have your little guy socialize with this big dog. If he has been socialized over the last few weeks with other dogs closer to his size and getting bigger over time, this should be a piece of cake for him.
Step
6
Rewards
Make this time with your little dog and the big dog special by offering them both rewards as they walk together and get to know one another.
Step
7
Practice
Put these two dogs in different situations on leashes while walking in your backyard, not leashed while playing at dog parks with other dogs, and inside your home. If these are your two dogs they need to know how to get along wherever they are. Be sure to always reward them for a job well done and for good behavior when they are getting along together.
Recommend training method?

The Common Ground Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Introduction
Bring food for each dog to the initial introduction of the dogs. If these dogs already know one another and you are trying to train them to get along, bring special treats for them both to your training sessions and reintroduction to one another.
Step
2
On leashes
Whether this is a first introduction or a reintroduction, put both dogs on a leash. For the first several training sessions together, they should both be on leashes. This teaches them that you are master and you are controlling the training sessions.
Step
3
Big dog
Your big dog might be excited to interact with this little guy, especially if the small dog is new to him. Control him on his leash so he doesn't overreact, become too excited, and injure the little dog. As you are introducing the little dog to your big guy, offer him a treat. This will distract him a bit with food as well as let him know that there may be more to earn with good behavior.
Step
4
Small dog
The same as with your big dog, watch the small dog and as soon as he sees the big dog, offer him a treat. This sets the tone for the dogs' meeting and training sessions together. Each dog knows there are treats at stake and they will need to earn them.
Step
5
Commands
If you haven't worked with the dogs individually on basic commands, you may want to try these before the dogs interact much together. If your dogs already know basic commands, start by having them both sit. When they obey, give them another treat.
Step
6
Work together
With the dogs still on leashes, have them do some commands they know together. So when you ask them to sit they both sit at the same time and they both earn a treat. Do as many commands as they can get through while expecting them to react and respond at the same time and rewarding them at the same time. This puts each dog on the same level with you as the master.
Step
7
Gentle play
After some commands and treats, bring the dogs closer together to sniff and explore one another. Keep them on leashes, especially if they have fought in the past or if they are just meeting one another. Let them explore. Remember your big dog is probably bigger than he believes he is and can cause your little dog injury if he is overly excited and jumps around.
Step
8
Rewards
As they are sniffing one another and exploring the other, offer them each treats. Earned rewards for both dogs will remind them that if they both behave, they can both earn treats. Watch both dogs as they're eating the treats you have given them at the same time to ensure one is not aggressive with the other and trying to grab his treat.
Step
9
Off-leash
As your big dog and small dog get more used to each other and are rewarded for good behavior when they're together, try to have them together off-leash. Start this by keeping the leashes on the dogs but completely let go of them. This way, if something happens you can grab the leash pulling your dogs off of each other but without controlling them while they're making their own choices to get along.
Step
10
Unhook leash
When you can trust your big dog and little dog to be in the same space playing or working on training commands together, earning treats, unhook the leashes. Let them practice being around one another without the leashes. Keep practicing with the dogs sharing the same space.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 12/15/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
King
American Bulldog
3 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
King
American Bulldog
3 Years

He (king) attempts to lick and hump the girl(stromme). She growls and shows her teeth and then snaps and tries to bite king. And he looks like he wants to attack but doesn’t. Then he gets nervous and then eventually lays down.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nick, First, are both dogs sprayed and neutered? If not, that's my first suggestion. If they are, the behavior is probably either obsession, wanting to play, or a dominance matter. Teach King the Out command, Leave It command, and Place. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Practice those commands with pup until he is reliable at them, then use those commands to give him directions when he is pestering your other dog. If he disobeys and continues bothering her, use a Pet Convincer - which is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air and spray a small puff at his side while saying Ah Ah - to interrupt him, then have him to to Place. Practice structured obedience with the dogs together to work on a positive associate between them, that involves calmness, respect, and focus on you - such as practicing a heeling walk, down stay near each other, Place command on separate place beds, ect...Creating your own little obedience type class with the two dogs to improve that aspect of their relationship and encourage a healthy interaction between them. If you don't see improvement, I suggest hiring a professional private trainer who specializes in behavior issues and comes well recommended by their previous clients - to observe the dogs in person and trouble shoot. A visit to your vet might also be warranted if training isn't effective - to see if there might be something contributing to OCD - obsessive behavior. What you are describing it's that unusual though so I would suspect a behavior - training issue first, and worry too much about something more going on unless all training efforts weren't working. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bambi
Chihuahua
10 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Bambi
Chihuahua
10 Years

The problem I am having with Bambi is her being aggressive towards a new dog. I do have another dog that she gets along fine with (he's the black dog). A couple times we had a "sleepover" with my friends dog and she was not having it at all. We tried separating them in different rooms so that they could sniff each other under the doors. When we eventually let them all out, she would want to sniff the new dog, but wouldn't let him sniff her so she would growl and try to bite him. My other dog got along fine with the new one, but she didn't. I want to try and fix this problem because I'm planning on rescuing a bigger dog, but I'm not sure if I can with her like this.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tessa, If you can find a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area I think that she would really benefit from attending that class. The class is for reactive and aggressive dogs who all wear muzzle's during the class for safety and they are intensively socialized at a quicker pace. Her aggression sounds mild compared to some but the socialization in that type of safer environment would probably really benefit her. I also suggest practicing her heel (where you are leading the walk, she has to walk right next to you, and focus on you) with others who are doing the same. The structure of the walk and being in the following mindset while around the other dogs would be a good, calm way to socialize her probably. only walk her, have other owners handle their own dogs. She needs to work on tolerance but for her that probably needs to look like structure, following your lead, and generally getting used to being around a variety of dogs while everything is controlled (opposed to off-leash unstructured play like a dog park - which could make the problem worse). Check out the "Walking Together" method from the article that I have linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Woody
Labrador Retriever
3 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Woody
Labrador Retriever
3 Months

We just got Woody, a 30 lb 3 month old lab mix. He loves exploring the world with his mouth and is very clumsy as he doesn’t know his size yet. We also have an older 15 lb dachshund. When Woods sees Dexter, he paws and bites him as he would with dogs his size. How can we correct this behavior?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christian, I suggest teaching an "Out" command, a Leave It command, crate training him, and using an Exercise pen. Work on the Out command while you can supervise to teach him boundaries around the older dog. When you cannot supervise, attach him to yourself with a leash or confine him in a sturdy exercise pen with a food stuffed chew toy. You can make the exercise pen more sturdy by putting it in a corner and anchoring it to something stable. When you leave the house, confine him in a crate. I also suggest signing up for a puppy kindergarten class that has time for off leash to help him learn to control the pressure of his mouth by playing with other puppies and being given feedback - the play in the class should be monitored and puppies given breaks and calmed back down if a puppy starts to bully or feel overwhelmed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Introducing a crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Little Bit
Chihuahua
Six Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Little Bit
Chihuahua
Six Years

We've had our female Chihuahua for about 6 years. Recently, we brought a rescue male Boxer (Gryff) into the house. They've already tussled twice and the chihuahua got injured. She's the alpha, or thinks she it, but she gets in his face and growls and it makes him mad, or so it seems. The boxer is the most loving dog a person could have, but their interaction is causing us concern for the smaller dog. Our question is, will they ever be able to grow comfortable together or do we have a larger issue on our hands? Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ron, Without intervention they will likely not work it on their own. The more fights they have the worse it could get honestly. Both dogs need respect for you increased, clear boundaries and rules in the house, and to have the humans in the house enforce the rules for them so that neither dog is allowed to decide or enforce rules for another dog. First, work on building each dog's respect for you. I suggest teaching the following commands, especially Heel and Place. Also, if you chihuahua seems to be the instigator have her or both dogs work for everything they get for a while. For example, have her sit before you pet her, Down before you feed her, Watch Me before you let her outside, Wait before you throw a toy, ect...Make her work for what she gets in life. This is a non-confrontational way to gradually help build respect. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Create rules for the dogs and enforce them for each dog. For example: 1. No bothering another dog when they want to be left alone. 2. No trying to steel another dogs food or hovering around while they eat. 3. No guarding objects or people. 4. No blocking another dog from getting to a certain area or from going through a door way. 5. No being pushy with people or other dogs. 6. No stealing another dogs toy they have. Decide what your rules are and when one dog breaks them intervene. For example, if one dog takes another dog's toy, take the toy back from the thief, return it to the dog who had it first, and make the thief leave the room. If one dog tries to guard you or the couch from another dog, make the growling dog get off the couch and leave the room right away. If one dog tries to steal another dog's food block the thief and firmly walk toward them until they leave the room - better yet feed both dogs in locked crates to prevent stress around mealtimes in general. When both dogs respect you, know the house rules, and know through your consistency that you will enforce the rules, it leaves less room for the dogs to try to control each other and get into fights. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Pit Bullmastiff
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luna
Pit Bullmastiff
2 Years

She’s been traumatized recently, and being socialized was hard for a bit, I’m trying to get her used to people and that’s working, but now other dogs and animals is hard.
Some of the dogs she knows is okay, she likes to play with them, but outside of her knowing them, it’s awful. She wants to run at them and jump and she can be aggressive. When that’s not in her character at all. She was never like this before.
I need to introduce her to my friends small dog again, (they played when she was a puppy a few times) because we are going to be living together.
I’ve read the article and we definitely tried this, we will continue to try as well, I was going to get her a soft muzzle to just be cautious. But what other things should I try??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brittany, I suggest activities that are calm and more structured around other dogs so that her stress response is lower and its easier for her to learn to associate dogs with a calm, pleasant feeling, and not adrenaline and arousal - which can be fun during roughhousing but also lead to fights and anxiety. If she gets to the point where calm is the norm, then play with other well mannered, social dogs can be added in locations that are less stressful - like your own fenced yard for a play date. Check out the Passing Approach and Walking together methods from the article I have linked below. Teach pup a structured heel, then work on pup passing your friend's dog on the opposite sidewalk. Correct pup for staring, fixating, not heeling, and generally reacting aggressively - don't wait for a full blown aggressive response, pup is likely to respond much better when she hasn't gotten highly aroused yet and full of adrenaline. When pup sees the other dog and does well, reward with calm praise and a treat each time you pass and she does well or are about to pass and she looks at the other dog calmly, then back at you for direction. Practice passing the dog over and over again until both dogs can pass each other calmly - you are desensitizing them to each other. When both dogs can pass within a few feet of each other and stay calm around each other, switch to the Walking Together method - starting the walk on opposite sidewalks and slowly closing the gap between them as they improve. Practice this with one friend until the dogs do well together - expect this to take multiple sessions before you can calmly walk them side by side together. Especially practice this with the future roommate and her dog!! But also practice with other dogs too to help pup learn to like all dogs. When pups are doing well, recruit a different friend and start over with another dog. You want pup to begin associating big dogs with that type of calm, structured, boring, focused, and pleasant activity (the walk itself is pleasant when kept calm). Repeat the training with lots of different friends and their social dogs - no aggressive dogs, so that pup will generalize the training not just to a handful of dogs but big dogs in general. You could also see if there is a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area, which is a class for dog reactive and dog aggressive dogs - who are intensively socialized together while they all wear basket muzzles for safety. Finally, when pup is doing really well but you want to continue the progress even more, see if there is a dog walking or dog hiking group in your area you could go on hikes or walks with with pup - this allows pup to be socialized with other dogs in a calm, pleasant way also. A group obedience class is also good. If you let pup meet other dogs on leash - which isn't ideal right now, keep the greeting to 3 seconds, then tell pup "Let's Go" cheerfully and start walking away. Give pup a treat when she follows - this helps her learn to go when you say and make the exit pleasant. Keeping greetings to 3 seconds in that type of tense situation (on leash - where both dogs are trapped and nose to nose) lets them satisfy their curiosity but ends the interaction before competing begins. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Leo
Docker
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Leo
Docker
2 Years

Hello,
Leo is a rescue we have had him for about a month. He spent the first year of his life on the streets of TJ, and the second year in a rescue house with 15 other dogs, small and big dogs. His behavior toward other dogs can be very random. He’ll tuck his tail and run from a teacup yorkie that barks even once at him. And other small dogs he’ll be fine with. Bigger dogs he’ll sometimes bark from a distance at them and act tough. Then when it comes to getting closer to them he retracts and gets very snippy at them as soon as they get close. He has done that to small dogs too, they come anywhere close to him he’ll growl and snap at them. We have been taking him to the dog park and going into the small breed section and he has been doing much better with small dogs. Sometimes he’ll growl but he hasn’t gotten snippy in a few trips... big dogs though are a whole different story. They get close and he snaps, curls into attack position and gets the teeth out. I have friends with big dogs, some calm and some very in your face. I’m just wondering if it’s good to maybe introduce him to the bigger dogs as I hold him, pet the bigger dogs for a bit to show him that I am ok with them and they are nice, maybe have them sit, then have him sniff them a bit while I hold him? I will try some of the methods above but it is tough when the bigger dogs aren’t yours. Appreciate any help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Phil, I suggest trying something a lot less confrontational. Check out the Passing Approach and Walking together methods from the article I have linked below. Teach pup a structured heel, then work on pup passing your friend's dog on the opposite sidewalk. Correct pup for staring, fixating, not heeling, and generally reacting aggressively - don't wait for a full blown aggressive response, pup is likely to respond much better when he hasn't gotten highly aroused yet and full of adrenaline. When pup sees the other dog and does well, reward with calm praise and a treat. Practice passing over and over again until both dogs can pass each other calmly - you are desensitizing them to each other. When both dogs can pass within a few feet of each other and stay calm around each other, switch to the Walking Together method - starting the walk on opposite sidewalks and slowly closing the gap between them as they improve. Practice this with one friend until the dogs do well together - expect this to take multiple sessions before you can calmly walk them side by side together. When pups are doing well, recruit a different friend and start over with another dog. You want pup to begin associating big dogs with that type of calm, structured, boring, focused, and pleasant activity (the walk itself is pleasant when kept calm). Repeat the training with lots of different friends and their social dogs - no aggressive dogs, so that pup will generalize the training not just to a handful of dogs but big dogs in general. You could also see if there is a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area, which is a class for dog reactive and dog aggressive dogs - who are intensively socialized together while they all wear basket muzzles for safety. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bjorn
Karakachan
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bjorn
Karakachan
9 Months

Bjorn has grown up playing with many different dogs and people sense he was a puppy. He has always been friendly around other animals and people. However, he is now 90 pounds and has gotten too big to continue to play the way he is used too. There have been several times recently where he has pinned a much smaller dog and not let them up. He has also done this to a 7 year old. He is neutered and gets plenty of exercise every day as we live on a farm and he has plenty of room to run around all day. He is also trained well to come on command as well as sit and lay. I can tell he is not acting out of aggression but how can I teach him that this is not an appropriate way to play?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Noah, Honestly, I would teach him that he is not allowed to roughhouse with kids or small dogs period. I know that doesn't sound like fun, but he really does not need to rough house to be happy, it's not very safe for him to do so, and it will be incredibly hard to enforce him roughhousing but not getting carried away because when he has already begun roughhousing, his arousal will be high and it's hard for him to calm himself back down - you would have to constantly monitor the play and intervene for up to a year. Teaching him to generally be calm around all small dogs and kids is better for him long-term for a variety of reasons. With that said, getting along with a small dog and playing with a small dog are actually two separate things. He can still learn to get along well with small dogs and kids and enjoy them, he just needs to learn to be calmer around them. To teach him to be calmer around them, I suggest teaching the Leave It and Out commands (Out means leave the area), as well as a Place command for times when he is inside and needs to just lie down to avoid temptation to roughhouse. Whenever he starts to initiate playing with a kid or smaller dog, use those commands and enforce them. Reward with treats and very calm praise for staying calm around kids and small dogs. Practice him being able to stay calm around kids and small dogs by having him on a long leash and walking past other dogs or kids. When he starts to get excited or approach them without permission, command Out or Leave It. If he disobeys, reel him in with your leash and practice some heeling with him to calm him back down. If he obeys and leaves them alone, praise softly and give a treat. When he is completely calm, (assuming he is normally fine with kids) let him go all the way up to the kid and have the kid give him some commands, like Sit, and toss treats on the ground for him when he obeys. You want him to associate kids with good things, but just give him something calmer and fun to do with kids instead of wrestling...such as performing tricks and commands and being calmly petted. Always supervise kids with dogs. You can also practice heeling walks and obedience commands with another small dog - to allow him to socialize with them and enjoy their company but do it in a calm way, that build his impulse control around the other dog. All of this can actually prevent future issues between the dogs when he hits maturity between 1-2 years, when he is less likely to want to play anyway and more likely to start challenging other dogs - which sometimes leads to fights for some dogs. Having the dogs practice calm, focused activities together, where they are both obeying you, is a great way to build healthy relationships between dogs now. Leave It method - start with this method. When he can do this method, then add in the practice around other dogs on the long leash (training leash, not retractable leash, check out medota brand 20' leashes or similar type training leashes). https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bella
Mastiff
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bella
Mastiff
3 Months

I also have two 4 pound Chihuahua's, and I am afraid Bella will hurt them playing too roughly. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dawn, First, I suggest enrolling pup in a puppy play class where he can learn bite inhibition and better impulse control by playing with other puppies off leash in a moderated, safe environment in class. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Second, teach pup an Out command, Leave It command, and Place command. At this age, only allow the dogs to be together with pup while you are there to supervise. Pup should be in an exercise pen or crate with a durable chew toy when you can't supervise. You can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash. I actually suggest teaching all three dogs to interact calmly with each other, doing more structured activities like training games and heeling walks to bond, and not allowing any sort of rough housing between them in your home. Get puppy in a good puppy class with time for off-leash play and that is a better way for pup to learn the right control and socialization. Pup does not need to rough house with your older dogs to be happy and have a good relationship with them - provide other forms of mental and physical exercise and socialization instead. Use the Out, Leave It, and Place command to teach all the dogs to interact more calmly around each other. Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place taught with leash pressure and treats: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Place taught with treats only: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjCcVXGFvTs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zuzu
German Shepherd
4 Years
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Zuzu
German Shepherd
4 Years

I adopted my dog Zuzu a year ago from the shelter with some unknown history (she was a former pot farm alert dog possibly according to her file). She is a german shephard and husky mix. She gets along great with my corgi mix (he's about 30 pounds) with no issues no matter the situation. However, she has on/off aggression with my terrier (about 20 pounds). When we observe her she will be fine one day and the next she will attack the terrier (growl, bare teeth, and pin him to the ground). One time he was sitting in a chair and she didn't do anything and then another time he's sitting in the same chair and she will attack without any other situational changes. There are other situations where we can see she's going to attack if human food is involved, but that is not present in every situation where the big one attacks the small one. We can have them sit and eat treats together with no problems and they can eat their normal food together without incident.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ash, I suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues in this case. It sounds like their could be some resource guarding going on other than just with food too, such as with people or objects too. It could also be something related to body language between the dogs. It could be a lack of socialization around small dogs, or just your particular dog. Either way, this is something that needs to be addressed in person from someone who can view the dogs together and work on a protocol based on what they learn from seeing them interact. Check out Thomas from the Canine Educator, and Sean O' Shea from the Good Dog. They both have YouTube videos talking about aggression between dogs. Working on a lot of structure and commands that build impulse control and calmness, such as Place, Heel, thresholds, having pup work for what she gets by having to do a command first, such as Sit before being petted or Down before being fed, are good things to start with to lay a foundation of respect, boundaries, and calmness in the house, but additional training will be needed - the type depending on what the trainer determines after evaluating and working with them. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chewie and Rosie
lab collie mix
2 Weeks
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Chewie and Rosie
lab collie mix
2 Weeks

Hello! I have a 2-year-old Yorkie. We just took on a puppy. (8wks) Female lab collie mix. She is very nippy and she also tries to jump, in the same manner as the Yorkie. But she is heavier and also nips harder! I am working on the command "Leave it" but I am worried that she is going to hurt my Yorkie. How can I get her to stop jumping and nipping in general but specifically at the Yorkie? ANY help is appreciated. Thank You!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dan, Continue working on the Leave It command - it will take time but should pay off in the long run. Pup will need to be confined either in an exercise pen, crate, or tethered to yourself with a leash whenever you can't work directly with the dogs and mediate their interactions right now. Crate train the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once pup is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Continue working on Leave It. The Leave It method from the article linked below gives info on how to work up to teaching pup to leave things that move alone too: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are not working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm your older dog. Right now you want your older dog to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from her pestering her, and making her appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to puppy's presence and pup be respectful toward her as she grows, especially when she calms down when older. I also suggest starting to teach pup Place so that pup has a command that helps her calm down when needed. Finally, I highly recommend enrolling puppy in a puppy kindergarten class that has time for moderated off-leash puppy play with other young puppies. Ideally the class with have a few different puppies of various sizes and energy levels to help pup learn during play how to be gentle and control her mouth and size. Check out the article linked below for what to look for in a puppy class. You probably won't find an ideal class so just use this as a guideline, and focus the most on finding a class that offers off leash play during part of the class - with puppies' play being interrupted whenever they start to get too rough, letting them calm down, then releasing the most timid pup first to see if that pup is still up for more before the others join in. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Henry
Golden Retriever
6 Months
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Question
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Henry
Golden Retriever
6 Months

hello! I have a 6 month golden retriever named Henry (currently 55 lbs and expected to be 90lbs), and my boyfriend has a 4 year old yorkie mix name Sammie (7 lbs). We live together, and our dogs get along well, but because Henry is so much bigger (and still growing), we're constantly worrying about him accidentally hurting her. If he jumps off the couch or bed and she is on the floor, or when shes on couch and he jumps up- he isn't the best about watching where he steps. We're worried he may step on her and break a rib or something else. We've been trying to keep them seperate when he's being playful, even when she is in a playing mood too. Should we train Henry to stay off couch and allow Sammie to be on it? Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Janet, I would train Henry to stay off the couch - it may not seem fair but appears necessary. Get Henry a comfortable dog bed and teach him to go there instead, rewarding him when he does. You can also spend some time on the floor hanging out with him when you want to snuggle with him - he doesn't have to be on the couch for that. I also suggest teaching Henry a couple of spacial awareness commands: Out, Place, and Leave It, to help direct him around Sammie. When Sammie is on the couch, I would discourage Sammie from climbing into your lap uninvited - that could lead to Sammie resource guarding you from Henry, so keep Sammie's attitude in check too with boundaries. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Pomeranian
4 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Nala
Pomeranian
4 Years

I have a Pomeranian and my partner has a bullmastiff. They have met before but have been living seperately for the last 2+ years. They are now going to have to live together and we are concerned about the smaller dog becoming injured. We were keen to get some advise on how to go about this and will it be safe for them to be together. Also will they eventually be allowed to be left together ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, Whether they can eventually be left alone together completely depends on the individual dogs and their relationship - many dogs with a significant size difference stay with each other safely because all they do is lie around, they get alone well, there is no aggression between them, and they aren't playing rough. Assuming that they have done well in the past during walks together and meetings (if they haven't gone on walks together start doing that to create a calm relationship between them), I suggest the following: First, crate train both dogs using the crate manners and Surprise methods from the article and video linked below. Feed both dogs in separate locked crates at meal times. Crate manners - for teaching impulse control and calmness: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing the crate at first: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Second, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever any dog causing issues leave the area as needed - including any dog guarding something, trying to play to rough, pestering the other dog while they are sleeping, ect... Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If one dog growls at pup, make him leave the room while also disciplining the other dog if he was antagonizing him to deserve a growl. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them. Teach both dogs the Place command and work up to having them both stay on their separate Place beds calmly for 1-2 hours. This is a great calming, self-control building, and tolerance exercise. It also helps get them both in a working, more respectful mindset while in the same room as each other. If them playing together too roughly becomes an issue Place is a good command to manage that while teaching calmness around other dogs to them. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Finally, work on manners and building respect and trust for you and your partner, especially if any aggression, pushiness, or jealousy crops up with either dog. The following commands are good commands that can help accomplish that: Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you A structured walk, where both dogs are focusing on you or your partner, instead of competing to be in front, is a great bonding exercise for dogs because it keeps their energy lower (no excess adrenaline from roughhousing), them focused on you instead of overly focused on the other dog, it helps relieve stress - decreasing stress hormones usually, and is generally pleasant for them without adding a lot of excitement and arousal to the fun. If you are really worried about a bite from your larger dog you can also get him used to wearing a basket muzzle and use that tool at first. Use his daily meal kibble to introduce it, rewarding him for sniffing it, touching it, putting his face into it, letting you clip it, then wearing it for longer. Ease into it gradually - making it fun for him, and use a basket muzzle so that you can pass treats through the muzzles' holes and he will still be able to open his mouth with that type on to eat the food. You can also dip a straw in peanut butter (NO Xylitol - it's toxic to dogs) and poke the peanut butter covered straw through the muzzle's holes as a reward for tolerating it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buzz
Maltese
6 Months
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Buzz
Maltese
6 Months

Hi! I just got Buzz and introduced him to my 2 dogs (female chihuahua) and (male german shepard). At first everyone got along but the g.s. is only 4 months old and growing fast. He doesn’t realize his size and is a little rough on buzz. (i always keep an eye on them and usually separate them during the day). this has led to whenever i allow my g.s. into the living room to join us, Buzz growls and barks excessively if my g.s. comes near. I’m constantly yelling at them. The g.s. has so much energy he can’t help but jump around a lot but even being up on the safety of the couch and away from him buzz won’t stop. when they are both on the ground buzz can protect himself and scares g.s. off who just wants to play. i don’t know where to start.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dema, It sounds partially like anxiety about GS, trying to control his behavior dominantly, and maybe being possessive of you. For Buzz's jealous behavior, pushiness, and reactivity, work on taking the pressure off of both dogs to be the one in charge (which Buzz is more so doing probably than puppy) and in control by mediating situations for them, work on commands that improve calmness and self-control, and make and enforce the rules so that the dogs are not working it out themselves - you are telling them how to react and behavior in a calm but firm way. Essentially, you want Buzz to learn to let you handle situations and work on his respect and trust of you, and teach puppy to listen better and learn how to be calmer. I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness or mild resource guarding. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. it sounds like puppy is likely already crate trained, but if not Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes! Crate Manners - great calmness and gentle respect building exercise : https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If Buzz is standing next to you barking at pup, tell Buzz Out and enforce him leaving. When he is calmer and not being possessive of you, then send pup to place and invite Buzz over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog (which also means no climbing onto your lap, standing between you and puppy (guarding you), no nudging you, barking at you for attention, or other things that involve him being pushy or possessive of you. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention if pushiness is an issue, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If Buzz growls at pup, make him leave the room while also carefully disciplining pup if pup antagonized him. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. Teach puppy to leave Buzz alone unless told to "Go Play" - work on Place with chew toys, keeping tethered to yourself with a leash, Leave It command, and gentle discipline when he starts bugging him and doesn't obey Leave It or Out - this will take work, but stay consistent and calm as much as possible with both dogs. When pup first enters the room, give Buzz a treat without pup seeing so pup is associated with good things for Buzz - treats stop when pup leaves. When Buzz is being calm, tolerant, and friendly without acting possessive or pushy toward pup, you can also calmly give a treat. Keep the energy calm when interacting with the dogs. Don't feel sorry for either dog, but give clear boundaries instead. Don't expect them to be best friends right now - the goal is for them to calmly co-existence. When puppy matures and they have learned good manners around each other, they may decide to be friends as adults, but calmness, tolerance, and co-existence comes first. Teach Buzz the Quiet command: Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark When Buzz barks, tell him one time to be "Quiet" in a calm but firm tone of voice, and deal with any possessiveness like guarding you on the couch by making him get off and leave the room. If the barking continues after one warning and making him leave, then use a Pet Convincer - which is a small canister of pressurized unscented air (DON'T use citronella). Spray a small quick puff of air at his side while saying "Ah Ah" calmly. Don't spray it in his face. The Pet Convincer should surprise him enough for him to calm back down and stop. Repeat whenever he barks. When he gets calm and stays calm, you can very calmly reward him for being more tolerant. Make sure puppy is not antagonizing him too though - give puppy something constructive to do like play in an exercise pen, stay on Place with chew toys, be tethered to you, or play by himself or with you away from Buzz. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
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Question
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Nala
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

Hi, my fiancé and I recently got a new German shepherd puppy, named Kam. Our 2 year old yellow lab, Nala, and him are getting along fine so far. However, when they play together, Nala doesn’t seem to understand that she’s bigger than him and she doesn’t always pick up on when he’s done playing and trying to walk away (she thinks he’s trying to play chase). I’m worried about Kam getting hurt but also about how it will affect how Kam plays with other dogs in the future. Do you have any suggestions on how to handle/fix this situation in the future? Thank you so much for your help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sophie, I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot, and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving directions, moderating play, and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness, aggression, or mild resource guarding. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Using those commands, moderate their play and work on them being able to calmly coexist without playing the majority of the time. When you can supervise, they can play but practice both dogs being able to Out - leave the area, and calm back down before being allowed to resume. Pay attention to how aroused and excited they are - give breaks before arousal gets super high - keeping the play more moderate and calm for both dogs' sake. Also, work on both dogs staying on separate Place beds in the same room to teach them to simply coexist calmly most of the time and not always have to be playing. When you can't supervise, one or both dogs should be crated in separate crates with interesting, durable chew toys, like a dog food stuffed Kong - especially for puppy. If the problem gets even worse, I suggest a no-playing rule, and adding more structure to help with calmness - like Place and Leave It more often. Dogs don't have to play as adults to get what they need - they need to be able to calmly coexist together though and be respectful of each other. Puppies do need to play - but not really with older dogs, but with other puppies. Dogs and puppies tend to play differently, and puppies learn proper canine social skills and how to control the pressure of their mouths through play with other puppies. I would highly suggest enrolling pup in a class that has time for moderatesd off-leash play with other puppies. Some pet stores even offer free puppy play hours. Playing for other puppies could also help with pup's social skills and to prevent fear of other dogs or learning to play too rough from your other dog. Being around just one other family dog doesn't prevent issues with other unfamiliar dogs later - so socialization with other pups is important at this age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tina
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Tina
Yorkshire Terrier
1 Year

Tina(our little one) is being aggressive towards Abner. He scares her by his size and is getting a lot of attention. What should I do to make them get along?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessie, First, work on teaching the dogs the following commands - more on why in a minute: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Out command - which means leave the area - read the entire article: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method for teaching Leave It command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Crate training - Surprise method combined with crate manners video linked above too: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate The dogs really need structure, especially Abner. You need to keep Abner from bullying your small dog - you be the one to handle any issues so the dogs don't. Decide what your house rules are for the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if one dog comes over to your other dog while she is trying to sleep, tell the dog who came over "Out". If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your sleeping dog, blocking the other dog from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until he leaves the area and stops trying to go back to the sleeping dog. The Out article linked above has a section on pushiness that details how to do this. If one of the dogs growls at the other dog, make that dog leave the room while also disciplining the other dog appropriately if they were antagonizing the other dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your smaller dog to handle things herself - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for Abner to learn to stop bullying because you have taught it to him and not because your small dog has resorted to aggression or hide. Have all dogs practice being on separate place beds in the same room and staying on them for 1-2 hours calmly, especially Abner, and when things are tense. You can give them a food-stuffed chew toy on the place bed and they can move around to get comfortable but they can't get off until given a release command - don't put the bed too close together with food present. They need to have time where they are simply just calmly coexisting, and Place is also a good way to teach them impulse control and calm respect for you and how to cope with the other dogs being around better. When Abner gets too excited or agitated around your smaller dog, give the dogs a break by either tethering him to yourself with a 6-8 foot leash or crating one or both dogs separately. Feed both in separate locked crates so there is not competition for food or anxiety from the other dog hovering nearby waiting. If Abner is hard to physically handle right now, keep a 4-6 foot drag leash on him while you are home to supervise the leash dragging, so that you can simply pick of the end of the leash and enforce his obedience if he ignores you, without drama. Check out VirChewLy leashes for a chewproof leash if he chews normal leashes. Your attitude in the household needs to be very calm and confident. You should mean what you say and enforce the rules but be very calm and not angry, anxious, or loud - I know that's a lot easier said than done! Your attitude helps set the tone for the dogs being calmer and feeling like you are taking care of things and leading. When the dogs are being calm around each other and relaxed, you can give them a treat but try not to let the other dog see you doing it so they don't rush over too. Simply place the treat between their paws while they are lying down, then walk away so they don't get super excited. If Abner shows any form of aggression toward you at any point get help with the training from a professional trainer who specializes in aggression, fear, reactivity, and behavior problems - an obedience class isn't the only thing needed - you want a trainer who will work one-on-one and is experienced with behavior problems like aggression in addition to obedience. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Liberty
Weimaraner
5 Years
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Liberty
Weimaraner
5 Years

Liberty does fine at a dog park, yet she doesn't know how to play. She looks at them like back off, I'm human. She does growl but has never bitten. She tries to get away instead. I'm getting a little puppy and it will be a small breed. Do you think I'm being stupid? I have four son's and she is great with them and was always gentle with our youngest. He is now 5.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hi Kristi, It could go either way with a puppy. Dog parks are highly arousing and a lot of dogs there were not socialized while young and don't interact properly, so some dogs don't enjoy being there. I suggest testing out one on one interactions with other dogs to see if Liberty can simply peacefully co-exist around another dog without aggression or anxiety. Don't expect playfulness - she just needs to be able to simply hang out with the other dog without issues or stress. Test her around a few friends' dogs. Take the dogs on walks together where both dogs are heeling and focusing on you and not competing to be in front. Practice down stays at the house if the walk goes well. Finally, let the dogs simply hang out at the house with supervision. Keep both dogs from pestering the other one though. If she can calmly peacefully co-exist around other dogs without aggression or anxiety that is a good sign. Next, if she does well around friends' dogs test her around a puppy. Don't let the puppy pester her but see if she seems aggressive or anxious around the puppy even when he isn't directly bothering her. Be careful to take measures to protect pup in case she reacts poorly. A loose leash or back tie leash are good ideas, but your body language should be calm and relaxed so don't tense up on the leash. A back tie may help you be less tense or manage the puppy better. If she does well with all of the "hang out" interactions that is a good sign. If you do get a puppy at that point, expect to supervise them together and with a LOT of boundaries and structure. You will want to encourage calmness and focus on you in both dogs. You will want to keep pup from pestering Liberty, crate train pup and use an exercise pen for pup for times when you can't directly supervise to train dogs to be calm around each other - liberty may never play with the puppy and that is fine as long as she is kind and respectful toward pup, and you teach pup to be the same way back. Don't let them make or enforce rules for each other or "work things out on their own" - that can lead to fights. Create your house rules for dogs, enforce it for both dogs so both dogs don't have to be pushy to get what they need (like space while eating or sleeping). You want both dogs following you so that leadership isn't in question. On the flip side, enroll pup in a high quality puppy kindergarten class that has time for off leash play to help with her socialization. Don't expect Liberty to teach her what she needs to know as a dog. Take her around other puppies (puppies play differently with dogs, so no dog parks while young, but lots of puppy play groups). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
Australian Shepherd
5 Years
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Question
1 found helpful
Duke
Australian Shepherd
5 Years

Hi! I recently adopted Duke and the shelter did tell me about his past aggressive behavior toward other people and dogs. When he was at home with us he’s generally just calm and a happy dog which can get a bit hyper, typical Aussie. He’s big but he also seems to think like he’s a lap dog because he’s very clingy to me. He enjoys being petted while sitting next to me. He doesn’t bark and seems to tolerate other people when I take him out on walks. There was that one incident though when he saw a small dog being walked by its owner barking at him and he got too excited, he got out of his collar/leash and attacked the other dog. I think it’s more like wanting to play with another dog than being aggressive. But since he’s about 60lbs and the other dog is a miniature schnauzer, it almost seemed like he attacked the other dog and the dog was shaking in fear. Now I kinda get anxious about walking him and him seeing another dog. He only seems to act this way towards a small dog barking at him. I feel like he’s just misunderstood before and plus him being currently on heartworm treatment and having his activity level very restricted doesn’t help with his socialization, possibly contributing to behavioral problems. What can I do to help him socialize with other dogs without compromising his health? How can I avoid another attack on other dogs in the future?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Janna, To prevent him from getting away again I suggest either using a padded front clip harness to walk him or a prong collar with a caribeener between the prong collar and a normal buckle collar for added safety. Check out the video below for details on how to connect the collars. The prong collar will discourage fighting the leash to get away and stop the escape attempts that way, and the front clip harness simply makes it so that he can't slip a collar, but you will have to hold on tight to the leash and work on his behavior around other dogs still. About Prong collars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3iczULPcdE Fitting and carabinering the prong collar and buckle collar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23zEy-e6Khg Walking with the prong collar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVvy6fztL2Q&t=6s He needs to be interrupted with a small correction as soon as he starts scanning looking for other dogs or getting too worked up - if you wait until he explodes it will be hard to get through to him. When he remains calm or calms back down, praise him softly, and be sure to give him something else to do, like heeling with lots of turns and changes in pace to keep his focus on you around other dogs - to teach him to ignore them. Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel For socialization, work on calm obedience commands like Place and Down Stay and have people come over to your house and toss treats to him for staying calmly. You can also practice Heel, Down, Sit and Place while other dogs are walking by, and reward him for staying calm, obeying, and focusing on you. The main goal with his past should be to teach him to be self-controlled, calm, and relaxed around other dogs, so he doesn't necessarily need to be roughhousing or playing with them for socialization now - he could even have issues with that if there is a history of aggression. Once he is past heartworm treatment, then going on structured walks and hikes with other dogs while heeling would be great for him. It gives him companionship but encourages calmness, purposeful activity, and a pleasant association with other dogs because the hiking and walking is fun. Joining a Canine Good Citizen class, Intermediate Obedience class (basic obedience if he doesn't know commands yet), or some type of structured, calm class where he works on focusing around other dogs would also help with socialization when he is feeling better. For now work on calm obedience commands in the presence of other dogs so that he simply associates the dogs with calmness, focus on you, and something pleasant - treats for obeying. Have people over and practice calm obedience too, with the new people tossing treats to him for his polite behavior. Watch him carefully around new people at first though to make sure he does not have issues with possessiveness, fear-aggression, or any other type of aggression. Someone should always be aware of the potential for aggression or fear with a new dog, especially one that may have a history of some type of issue. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Theo
German shepherd anatolian
6 Years
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Question
1 found helpful
Theo
German shepherd anatolian
6 Years

So we recently got theo at a pound, he is older and fairly mellow and get along with most dogs when walking out an about. At home though we have two smaller dogs, one being a chihuahua mix. She is more aggressive with newer dogs but she gets along with our other small dog just ffine. She bites and theo and sometimes he doesnt react but other times he has pinned her in a corner or on the floor and one time he got her pretty good, but that day me and him were out in the sun so he may have been tired. He kind of eye balls the other two and sniffs them alot and it's been about 3 weeks since we have had him. I dont know if it will settle down or get worse. We have left them at home for hours before and no one was eaten but how do I know if they will for sure get along.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kendra, You need to hire a trainer to help you. It sounds like your Chihuahua is the main issue. Theo was very tolerant initially but is starting to fight back because your small dog is bullying him. If your Chihuahua keeps instigating fights Theos dislike for her will increase and he will have to increase the amount of aggression he uses toward her to get her to stop if she isn't backing off. To see improvement, your chihuahua's behavior issues need to be dealt with, and Theo taught to let you handle issues. It may be something that can be addressed well but it probably won't fix itself without working with the dogs and changing some things. When you are not home, they absolutely need to be kept separate. Not only does it put them at risk but it also gives your small dog a chance to bully Theo and the issue get worse and worse. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if one dog comes over to your other dog while she is trying to sleep, tell pup "Out". If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your dog who is trying to bother the other dog (if there is no aggression or fight yet), blocking the dog from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. Don't do this during a fight or if that dog has shown aggression toward you - use this to enforce rules before things get tense. If your small dog growls at Theo, make her leave the room while also disciplining Theo if he was doing something he shouldn't, like trying to steal a toy. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of both dogs to manage each other. You want the dogs to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and both to learn respect each other because you have taught it to them and not because either dog resorted to aggression. Get professional help, use basket muzzles, or both if you are in danger of being bitten - always take precautions to avoid a bite - don't assume a dog won't bite because any dog can. I also suggest teaching both dogs Place and working up to both dogs being able to stay on Place for an hour at a time. Have them go to Place to practice peacefully being near each other, avoid issues, and generally to increase calmness and a respectful attitude. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo The following is also a good exercise for increasing calmness and respect: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Siren
Siberian Husky
2 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Siren
Siberian Husky
2 Years

A couple months ago I adopted Siren from a shelter. She is the sweetest girl. She was already spayed when I adopted her. She is never aggressive towards dogs or people and does fantastic at the dog park. She loves to play with little dogs but she doesn’t seem to realize that’s shes bigger than they are. Sometimes if I tell her to “be gentle” she will walk away or calm down but other times she can get fixated on wanting to play with one dog and won’t listen to me. It could be a coincidence but it tends to happen more with intact males. She also does the same thing with cats. She wants to play with them like she would play with another big dog. How can I teach her to know the difference between dogs she can wrestle with and smaller dogs and cats that she needs to be gentle with?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carly, I suggest teaching the Out command - which means leave the area. Practice Out on a long leash places other than the dog park when she is really excited, until she can respond to the command even while excited, then phase the leash out in a fenced in area. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Dogs typically learn how to moderate their play with other dogs while playing with other puppies during the first few months of life, but you did not know her then. There is a chance you will not be able to fully teach her how to be self-aware and gentler on her own, but you can help her by working on Out during times of excitement and reminding her to be gentle as needed. I would not leave her unattended with small dogs and cats though - since she may need the extra guidance from you in order to remember. She could also be taught to avoid small dogs entirely. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Roscoe and dunkin
Shorkie Tzu
8 Weeks
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Question
1 found helpful
Roscoe and dunkin
Shorkie Tzu
8 Weeks

Hello. I just recently got my girlfriend a small dog Duncan who is 8 weeks old and I have a larger dog Roscoe who is about two. Duncan continuously wants to play with Roscoe however Roscoe seems to get aggravated when approached by Duncan. Duncan appears to want to play with his toys when he's playing with them. Duncan will also nip at Roscoe's feet and ears which clearly irritates him. I want to let my puppy be a puppy however I want to prevent The puppy from getting hurt possibly. what do you suggest to ease the tension between the two. I am mainly about Roscoe biting Duncan because of the growling

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ryan, Be the one to moderate puppy - so that your older dog sees that you will handle interactions and protect him from being overwhelmed by pup. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward puppy. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. Teach both dogs Place and work up to them staying on Place for up to an hour on separate place beds on different ends of the room. Give pup a (or both dogs) dog food stuffed Kong's to chew on while in Place. Teach puppy Out - which mean leave the area, and Leave It, and use those commands to manage puppy and your older dog together - to help pup learn to give your older dog space. Purchase an exercise pen for pup and practice the dog's being in the same room together while puppy is in the exercise pen - reward your older dog whenever he relaxes while puppy is in the room, your older dog is being tolerant, and when pup first enters the room. Out command - read the entire article but pay special attention to the "How to Teach the Out Command" and "How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior" sections for puppy: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Surprise method - can be used to introduce pup to exercise pen and crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Winston
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
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Question
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Winston
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

My family and I just adopted a lab puppy who is 5 months old. Winston (our new puppy) is a very good boy and wants to get along with our other two dogs, but Indy (the white poodle) gets very aggressive with him in situations involving food and our other dog Zoe. When Winston goes anywhere near Indy’s food or his treats and also when Winston goes near Zoe, Indy instantly starts attacking him. After Indy attacks him, Winston starts attacking back and since he is so much larger than Indy, he will pin him to the floor and start biting him, which hurts Indy. I’m worried that one day when Winston is defending himself, Indy will get seriously injured. Another issue is that Zoe is TERRIFIED of Winston because he is so much taller than her and barks and screams at the top of her lungs whenever he goes near her. Zoe has the same reaction when Winston tries to play with her. Again, this causes Indy to get defensive and starts attacking Winston. This situation is very frustrating and we’re not really sure how to fix it. Help would be very appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Genevieve, I suggest hiring a professional trainer who will come to your home to work with you in person. Look for someone who specializes in aggression and comes well recommended by previous clients whose dogs dealt with aggression. In the meantime, work on some boundaries between the dogs. Teach all the dogs the following commands and crate train each dog. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate Training - especially Indy and Winston: Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Feed all the dogs in separate locked crates - no treats around Indy right now. Finally, work on manners and building respect and trust for you with both dogs. Work on the following commands with all the dogs - focusing the most attention on Indy since Indy is resource guarding dogs and food. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you More training will be needed but you will need a qualified trainer who can safely demonstrate what to do and choose methods based on how the dogs are responding. Look for a trainer who uses both positive reinforcement AND fair corrections and a lot of boundaries. The dogs all need a lot of calmness and boundaries in the household right now. This definitely is not a case of letting them work it out on their own as you already know - pup's need a lot of structure and management right now to build respect for you, increase calmness and tolerance, and manage interactions. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Stella
Shepard mix
3 Years
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Question
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Stella
Shepard mix
3 Years

We recently adopted a 3yr old German Shepard/Austrailian Shepard mix. First two years of her life, she was kept in a crate 24/7 & was severely underweight. She's a healthy 75lbs and is extremely friendly with people/kids. However, with other dogs (especially when on leash) she acts aggressive to the point where we're worried she might harm them (very aggressive sounding bark & some teeth baring sometimes, yet her tail is wagging). She's done this with our tenants' Great Dane when on leash, but happened to be off leash when they came out one day & she just wanted to play with him. My parents recently got a wheatamix puppy and we NEED them to get along, but he's so little compared to her that we're extremely nervous he'll get hurt. We've tried a few brief meetings outside between them that starts off ok, but then either she moves too quick or the other dog does that all of a sudden sets her off. Advise or recommendations would be greatly appreciated!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question and very kind of you to adopt Stella. The leash aggression may stem from an incident that took place before you adopted her (especially since she was mistreated) so patience and perseverance are essential. And, for safety reasons, if this behavior continues much longer, I advise you take her to see a behaviorist because personal, face to face assistance can go a long way. Because this is a detailed problem to discuss, I suggest you read this excellent article on leash aggression and how to deal with it. https://positively.com/dog-behavior/aggression/leash-aggression/ I like the article because it is based on positive reinforcement and support which is what a dog like Stella needs. Here are a few more tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-not-be-aggressive. All the best to you and Stella!

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Duncan
Pit bull
4 Years
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Question
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Duncan
Pit bull
4 Years

My dog was a stray I rescued so I had to train him on a lot of house rules. He gets so excited when he sees other dogs that he wines. However I only take him to meet them on occasion as he jumps on other dogs being too excited and scared them off. Also with small dogs I never know how he will act. He once tried to bite a small dog and on another occasion he was just too excited to play that he jumped on top. I don't know what to do.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the picture of Duncan and for the question.The first piece of advice that comes to mind is to take Duncan to positive reinforcement obedience classes. It's clear that he does enjoy other dogs but needs to know how to make friends. This will come with socialization in a controlled setting and also with the knowledge of basic obedience commands. Allowing him to attend training and teaching him commands will give him structure, confidence, and mental stimulation, all things that make a happy dog. The Teach "Get It" Method may work well as one step towards calmness around other dogs: https://wagwalking.com/training/be-calm-around-other-dogs. Knowing the come, sit, stay, and down commands will all serve Duncan well, teaching him to behave around other dogs without scaring them off. Good luck!

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Sookie
Maltese
10 Years
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Question
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Sookie
Maltese
10 Years

Hello!

We recently got a new puppy (the mini Aussie) and our Maltese, who has been on her own for a while now, is having a hard time adjusting. I thought he would be a bit smaller to be quite honest but he’s pretty big in comparison to her. He’s about 12 inches at the shoulder, 12-13 pounds while she’s 8/9 and around 8 pounds.

She’s not aggressive by any means but is rather distant with the pup. We’ve had him for about two and half to three weeks now and she tolerates him to an extent. I’ve been trying the treat method listed here along with keeping one in a crate while the other can sniff at them without a fight breaking out. The Aussie has bitten our Maltese a few times and snaps at her but it doesn’t look mean, he just wants to play. But again, she wants nothing to do with him. He also doesn’t realize just how big he is in comparison to her and has caused her to yelp a few times. When she’s clearly distressed or anything like that, we do separate them. My s/o’s Dad lives with us as well and often keeps our Maltese in his lap (even when she doesn’t want to be there and will growl at him for picking her up)

Any insight on how to make them get along is much appreciated. This is my first dog that isn’t a toy breed so this is very new to me. The Aussie’s mom was tiny (smaller than him) but he’s turning out to be considerably bigger.

Thank you so much for your time and help.

-Nicole

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy - which it sounds like you are already doing! Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues (most of the time puppy probably) leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. I don't recommend holding your older dog whenever puppy is near, that can encourage Sookie to become possessive of people around the puppy and feel trapped. Instead utilize the Out command for puppy, an exercise pen so pup can be in the same room but not pestering Sookie, or attach pup to yourself with a six-to-eight foot hands free leash to give your older dog some space. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of his age it’s harder for her to handle him and keep up with his energy. She needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from him pestering her, and making his appearance pleasant for your older dog. Puppy also needs to learn to respect your older dog's boundaries - which will be your job to teach him not your other dog's - especially with the size and age difference. I highly recommend enrolling puppy in a puppy kindergarten class that has time for off-leash play to help pup learn socialization, gentle play, and bite inhibition with other dogs - other puppies play differently than adults so puppies learn those things best primarily through playing with puppies also younger than 6 months old. Check out this article for some guidelines on what type of class to look for for pup. No class will probably be ideal but look for something along those lines. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to puppy's presence as he grows, especially when he calms down when older. Know that it's normal for adjustments to take some time too. Prevent puppy from overwhelming your older dog, gradually work on teaching pup boundaries, and reward your older dog for calmness around puppy and tolerating puppy being in the same room well. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Theo
Great Dane
2 Years
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Question
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Theo
Great Dane
2 Years

Adopted a Great Dane, needing advice on how to introduce him to older small dog (female).
Great Dane is fixed, trained but we are not sure how he is with other dogs.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paula, Check out the Passing Approach and Walking Together methods from the article linked below. I would have a second person handle one of the dogs and gradually introduce them through a heeling walk using that approach. Once they can walk together happily after a series of sessions, then practice calm obedience commands with the two dogs in the same area on leash, such as the den or a backyard. You just want them to get used to each other's presence calmly, while giving them something to do that helps them stay calmer. Inside, keep things structured and calm - with puppy in an exercise pen or crate when you can't work with the dogs right now. Gradually give more freedom if the dog's are doing well together, as pup learns manners and your older dog shows that they are tolerant. Always crate pup when you aren't present at this age though, no matter how well they do, so that pup can't pester your older dog and create an issue. Passing Approach and Walking Together method for initial introduction: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Introducing a crate - Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Place - a good command for both dogs to know to facilitate them hanging out calmly in the same room on separate dog beds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Finally, teach both dogs the Out command and use that command to enforce the dogs leaving each other or anything they try to guard - including people, alone when issues do come up. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ You be the one to mediate their interactions, decide house rules for the dogs and their interactions, and to enforce those rules, so that neither dog is allowed to bully or pester the other, or use aggression to enforce a rule. I don't recommend letting most dogs work it out for themselves initially - but instead enforcing rules among the dogs so that the household is calmer and there are less opportunities for issues to arise to begin with. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Teddy
Yorkshire Terrier
3 Months
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Question
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Teddy
Yorkshire Terrier
3 Months

We just got a 12 wk old yorkie. We also have a bigger dog, she’s 6 yrs old and a mix. When the pup and her interact our big girl bear is playful and fine but the pup keeps licking her face and snapping up in her face. Our big dog eventually gets tired or annoyed, and the pup doesn’t give up. How can I train this or is this normal for a pup?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Heather, It is normal, but also I would suggest stepping in and helping pup learn so that your older dog doesn't have to resort to aggression to tell pup to stop. First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Use this command specifically when pup won't give your older dog space, and use the section on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior to help pup give space when they are struggling to calm down on their own. Many puppies also get really wound up when over-tired, and might need a bit of a break in a calm space like the exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy to chew on, when they are super excited - or may need a little training exercise to stimulate them mentally if they haven't had that recently. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Oh I see the link you put in now, thank you

Ok great, thanks for the response. What exactly do you mean by crate training? He sleeps in his crate at night and doesn’t even cry now to go to bed and sleeps great. During the day I only put him in there for a few hours if we go out. I understand the out command, that is helpful. Thank you!

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Monty
Jack Chi
4 Years
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Monty
Jack Chi
4 Years

Hi, I have adopted a Jack Russell cross chihuahua from a dog shelter. He is good and plays with small-medium dogs however can get very snappy with some big dogs (Labrador and up in size). Is there a way to stop/minimise this? Thank you! xx

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thanks for the question. It sounds as though Monty may have a fear of big dogs and snaps to protect himself. Soon you will be able to attend dog training classes and that will go a long way toward helping Monty gain confidence. As well, you will have the help of the trainer right then and there to tackle the issue. Read these tips as well: https://wagwalking.com/training/get-along-with-other-dogs. The conditioning method may work: https://wagwalking.com/training/get-along-with-other-dogs-1. slow and consistent interaction with other dogs will help Monty adjust and learn they can be friends. Good luck and keep working on these tips!

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Logan
German Shepherd
10 Years
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Logan
German Shepherd
10 Years

My dog Logan is a large German shepherd, he loves other dogs. My daughter just got a tiny Chihuahua puppy. Logan loves to follow the puppy and always has a eye on him. Logan also likes to lick the puppy, nibble his back, nudge the puppy with his nose, and sometimes put the puppy in his mouth (kind of like a mom dog does to her puppies) Logan doesn't get mad at the puppy when he climbs on him or plays with his tail. Should I be worried about Logans behavior? Logan does muzzle grab my 3 year old American bulldog, has been since she was a crazy puppy.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the great pictures. It does seem that Logan is pretty good with the puppy and tolerates him well. I would be extra careful though and be sure to never leave them alone together (at least not until they have been familiar with each other for several months - but even then, the difference in their size makes for caution at all times.) If at any time there is behavior that you are not comfortable with, consult a trainer in your area who can assess the two dogs together just to make sure all is safe. Good luck with the three dogs!

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Luna
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
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Luna
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

She’s really good with people and big dogs but started becoming defensive/aggressive with smaller dogs how can I prevent this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carmin, See if there is a G.R.O.W.L. class within driving distance of you. A G.R.O.W.L. class is a class for dog reactive/aggressive dogs, who all wear muzzles and are intensively socialized together in a structured environment. You would also want to check with the instructor to make sure some of the dogs in the class will be small dogs in the one you join. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Katrina
German Shepherd
3 Years
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Katrina
German Shepherd
3 Years

Katrina is a Fostered dog, abused previously, serious anxiety, PTSD, separation anxiety and PTSD separation anxiety. Aggressive towards dogs her size and bigger. Aggressive towards female dogs, aggressive towards small dogs as well, I don't know what to do and I have very little to work with.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, with all of the issues that Katrina has, I suggest that you consult a behaviorist in your area who can help her to overcome or at least lessen the problems. It is unfortunate that she has been through all of these things. You are fostering her? Can the organization offer any support at all? Please look online for a specialist that may even be able to work over Zoom if they are not in your area. It is not something that can be fixed without personal or at least video/zoom contact. Take a look here for helpful videos and the opportunity to talk to a trainer. https://robertcabral.com/. All the best to you and Katrina.

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Ice
Pomchi
2 Years
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Ice
Pomchi
2 Years

Ice and the other dogs (English Bulldogs) didn’t get along too well and we had to give him up, but we hadn’t thought about getting a trainer. I was wondering if training the dogs to all get along would be possible considering Ice is part Chihuahua which I’m pretty sure are aggressive by nature.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stephen, That depends a lot on the severity of the aggression, how much you are willing to manage the situation, and the other dogs' responses. I have worked with people who successfully manage multi-dog households with a dog who is otherwise dog aggressive, but with a more severe case it took a lot of management and hours of training to get to that point, and the aggressive dog can never be given the same type of freedom that a non-aggressive dog could have. With proper training and management they do co-exist well though. Other cases are more easily resolved by addressing an underlying issue like fear, resource guarding, or generally changing the the boundaries set for the dogs. I suggest hiring a trainer who specializes in aggression and comes well recommended to evaluate the case on an individual basis to give you a better idea of whether it's doable in your situation, and what it would involve training and management - wise. Some of these cases are easily resolved with behavior modification, others require life-long management and high levels of training to ensure safety. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Victoria
Jack Russell Terrier mix
10 Years
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Victoria
Jack Russell Terrier mix
10 Years

We recently was given a young lab puppy (Samuel) whom has come to live in our yard where we have an older 10 year old Jack Russell Terrier mix (Victoria). The lab puppy is very playful and well mannered but my older dog does not like him when he tries to play with her. Samuel is kept outside in a separate fence and Victoria has her own larger territory of the back yard that is also fenced in. They are both outside dogs and they do not have to interact together but we would like them to be friends and positively socialize since they will be living on the same property. The older dog always fights the lab puppy and the lab puppy is always submissive. If Samuel tries to play with Victoria or even touches her then she will yelp with teeth bared and attack him, Samuel does not fight back and just submits when he is attacked. My concern is not only that they are not getting along but also that Samuel will get much bigger and could possibly harm Victoria sense they do not have a solid relationship. We tried taking them on a play date at a neutral location (the lake park). Victoria was still very aggressive to Samuel whenever he makes physical contact with her. They could walk around the park together peaceably as long as they were kept within leash length of each other. They were able to play in the water at the river while apart but still did not react kindly to each other on the shore. Back home after the play date Victoria attacked Samuel again. So we put Samuel back in his large fenced in area of the property and left Victoria out side in the open yard. She then comes over to the fence and barks at Samuel through the wire of the fencing. After Samuel lies down she will walk away.

I assume that Victoria is asserting her dominance over the new puppy, which is to be expected but I don’t think she is doing it appropriately by constantly attacking him. I think she may be attacking him out of fear since she has begun yelping at him during her attacks. I don’t want Samuel to be bullied and I don’t want him to be compelled to fight back in the future as a larger dog. And I don’t want my smaller dog to be fearful of the new lab puppy and constantly attack him. Is there a way that we can make them like each other? Is there away to prevent my older dog from constantly attacking the puppy when he tries to interact with her?? What steps should we be taking to socialize them???? Please, any advice will be helpful, we are really trying to make them get along with each other or we may have to think about rehoming the lab puppy.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, the fact that both dogs live outside makes it a bit hard to monitor them and therefore, work constantly on getting them to like each other. Taking them to the park on the leash on neutral ground and the swimming experience is exactly what I would have recommended as well. It is unfortunate that their relationship is so volatile and it is really hard to say if they can ever be friends based on what you have described. I agree, you do not want either one of the dogs to be injured by the other. As well, neither one of them is living a peaceful life as there is much tension. I suggest contacting a trainer who is used to working with aggressive dogs, to see what their opinion is based on face to face observation of the dogs. I am sorry that I cannot recommend anything other than that. You can take a look here for tips, but I think one on one training is the only way: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. This site may have helpful videos and the opportunity to contact a trainer: https://robertcabral.com/. Good luck and all the best!

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Nico
Pit bull
3 Years
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Nico
Pit bull
3 Years

I have two little dogs a male and a female the male (Osito) is a Pomeranian and the female (Gigi) is a Toy Poodle. Gigi is the leader of the pack and Osito just followes her lead. I recently got a male Pit Bull (Nico) and while trying to introduce the three it got a little crazy Nico jumped and barked and just tried to play and it scared my two little ones and they both snarled and ran away. Ever since ive been looking at ways to introduce them in a better manner but i just cant seem to find anything that will work. Im very scared that Nico will end up hurting my small dogs and i just dont want to have to take him back to the shelter.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It is a good idea to take them all on a long walk together. That tends to be the first step in bonding. Many dog foster parents, or trainers at behavior rehabilitation swear by doing this. Do this for a few days in a row, and let them come around on their own.

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Charlie
Pit Bull,bull mastiff,and grey houn
6 Years
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Charlie
Pit Bull,bull mastiff,and grey houn
6 Years

My dog is good with other dogs but when it comes to food he has became aggressive because he has usually only been the only dog and grew up on a reservation but recently me and my girlfriend have purchased two puppies brother and sister and we just want our bigger dog Charlie to be good with them but we are still worried what could happen between them

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, do not feed the puppies and Charlie in the same room. Let Charlie eat on his own somewhere else. This is very important. Don't leave the puppies alone with Charlie at any time. Take the three of them on walks together so they can become more tolerant of each other on neutral ground as opposed to in the house. A few walks a day, over a period of a few weeks will help. As well, read this guide: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Charlie will need even more attention than normal so that he knows he is still top dog. Don't let the puppies bother him, and make sure that Charlie has a place to go to get away from the puppies if he needs peace and quiet. As soon as the puppies have their vaccines up to date, begin their obedience classes. And if Charlie needs a refresher course, that will help to bring harmony to the home as well. If there is continued aggression, you will need to call in a trainer to the home to ensure the safety of all of the dogs. Good luck!

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Aska
Belgian Malinois
3 Years
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Aska
Belgian Malinois
3 Years

Okay, so I had the two small dogs (Westy and Spitz,both females) for a few years now, and they have a sister bond. They squabble from time to time but whenever it escalates, they deescalate it on their own, so we really don't have to break them off ever. Yesterday we found an abandoned Belgian Malinois on a mountain (female, same age as these two) so we decided to adopt her. She is very obedient towards us and humans in general, but she has an issue with these two. Initally she was very friendly, but the Spitz was a bit scared and cautious, while the Westy was a bit neurotic and excited. At first it all seemed okay but as time goes by we noticed that the Malinois doesn't like the caution and fear. She doesn't even like the Westy violating her personal space with simple sniffs. I triex walking them together on a leash and holding them close to eachother but without any big changes. Keep in mind that the Westy is our family dog since she was a baby, while the Spitz and Malinois are rescued. The Spitz had a rough past with bigger dogs so the fear is understandable. The two smaller ones are very protective of eachother so every squabble is 1v1 is like a 1v2. How can I make this household work?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aras, It sounds like there may be some doggie-rude behavior going on, some possessiveness, and of course the fear. I would add a lot more structure and boundaries in the household for all the dogs to set the expectation for how they should interact, help increase calmness, and give your fearful dog a bit more confidence due to predictability and you managing their interactions. I would also calmly reward the fearful dog for acting calm around the Malinios when they are in the same room/general area when you catch that - but without the other's dogs seeing you do so, since you don't want them rushing over for a treat too and starting a food fight. First, crate train the dogs using the crate manners and Surprise methods from the article and video linked below. Feed the dogs in separate locked crates at meal times, or at least in different spaces. The crates give the dogs somewhere calm to be when you are away or unable to supervise them together - they shouldn't be left unsupervised yet. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Second, teach all the dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed - including if pup guarding another dog. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your resting dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your dog growls at pup, make the one who growled leave the room while also disciplining pup if pup antagonized. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression or had to hide all the time. Teach the dogs the Place command and work up to having them each stay on their separate Place beds calmly for 1 hour at a time. This is a great calming, self-control building, and tolerance exercise. It also helps pups get used to each other calmly. Eventually you can give each dog a dog food stuffed chew toy to entertain themselves on Place, but you will have to enforce Place really well or back tie each pup while they are on Place - to avoid another dog leaving their place to try to sleep someone's toy - and causing a food fight. Each should stay firmly on their own Place until given permission to get up. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Finally, work on manners and building respect and trust for you with the dogs. This can help overall listening and having a peaceful household. It also stimulates the dogs mentally - taking the edge off of extra energy, over-excitement, and nervousness. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

A few days have passed and some changes have been noticed, some for the better some for the worst. The Westy got used to her, is a bit more relaxed but still violates her personal space sometimes. The Spitz is still kind of afraid of the Malinois and the Malinois growls at her whenever she gets closer than 2-3 meters. We've noticed that the Malinois is very possesive of me and the humans in the house in general, but mostly me. So on that note, whenever I walk the other dogs she goes crazy jumping around (on the leash). She has a very hostile look towards the Spitz whenever she passes by and it kind of scares me cause I can never assume when she will go crazy. She eyeballs her and we have to warn her, clap our fingers or something for her to drop focus. I mostly order the little dogs to stay away from her whenever she is alone cause it annoys her having them around. I still don't know what to do with them, I have done most of the things you have said to me over the course of these days, some things I knew and implemented beforehand, but I don't see any big and positive changes going on.

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Little Dog
Papillon
9 Years
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Little Dog
Papillon
9 Years

We recently just adopted a German Shepard, Pyrenees male 3 year old and we are struggling with our Papillon mix mounting him and then him turning around and attacking/hurting the smaller one. Any tips or tricks in how to prevent the smaller dog from asserting dominance and the larger one retaliating?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Natasha, First, crate train both dogs using the crate manners and Surprise methods from the article and video linked below. Feed both dogs in separate locked crates at meal times. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Second, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed - use this command when the Papillon approaches the older dog dominantly - hopefully before pup even attempts a mount. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog acting pushy or rude, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. Do this before pup has mounted your other dog, and not in the middle of a fight! Always be aware that a dog can redirect their aggression toward whoever is closest - leading to you being bitten. If there seems to be risk of that, have both dogs get used to wearing basket muzzles and practice the training with pup's wearing basket muzzles whenever in the same room. You can introduce the muzzles ahead of time using treat rewards with each dog separately so that the muzzles are not a source of stress for either dog. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. Reach out to a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and comes well recommended by their previous clients who had similar needs, if things are not improving, getting worse, or you feel unsafe, ill equipped to train this on your own or overwhelmed at any point. Teach both dogs the Place command and work up to having them both stay on their separate Place beds calmly for 1-2 hours. This is a great calming, self-control building, and tolerance exercise. It also helps get them both in a working, more respectful mindset while in the same room as each other. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Finally, work on manners and building respect and trust for you with both dogs, especially the papillon. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working method and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Brutus
Bullador
7 Weeks
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Brutus
Bullador
7 Weeks

We have a yorkie that’s older amd we want them to get along and be friends

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Steven, Have the dogs been introduced yet? How are they behaving with each other so far? A good way to help them bond is by taking them on walks together - especially if the walks are a bit more structured and one dog on either side or two people walking them separately - so pup can't jump on the older dog or bite them during the walk. Since pup is small, I recommend doing this in your own yard or locations where other dogs aren't likely to have gone, until pup is fully vaccinated. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buff
Saint Bernard
2 Years
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Buff
Saint Bernard
2 Years

We own two smaller dogs and we recently adopted Buff, who is much bigger. We want him to realize how big he is and cant play so ruff with our smaller dogs. Also we still does the puppy biting and we want to train him not to jump.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jenny, I suggest teaching the following commands: Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Step Toward and Leash methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump For the biting, work on Out when temptations are too much, and the instructions from the leave It method above. For the playing, work on Out and moderate play. Whenever they get too excited or one dog seems overwhelmed, interrupt them, have them do a couple commands for treats to calm down, then let the more timid dog go first, to see if they still want to play. If they do, let the second dog go with "Okay, go play" as well. If the first dog doesn't want to play still, redirect them to something calmer, like lying on separate Place beds with their own chew toys to calm down. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kylo
Hound
1 Year
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Kylo
Hound
1 Year

We adopted a hound terrier mix around March. He has a lot of social problems. He is incredibly anxious around strangers and things that are out of place. He does well when we are one on one in the apartment. When we take him for a walk he rarely heals and pulls a lot of the time. I've tried teaching him "no pull" and "heel", but it doesn't seem to be working. I've also been exposing him to other dogs within our family and so far he's been doing pretty good with them, but he tends to play a little rough and gets overly excited. Well, we just found out we are more than likely going to be taking in a mineature dachshund that he has met before. I am nervous because Kylo gets overly excited with him and plays to rough like he doesn't understand it's another dog. I honestly think he sees him as a toy, but I don't think he wants to intentionally hurt him. He does much better with the Cavalier King Charles we introduced him too. So any advice on how to get him to tone down and not play so rough with the other tiny dog we are taking in would be great. I've already tried training them together, but it seems once the treats go away he goes right back to playing rough. Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! With this type of stuff, it is best to work on a dogs behavior as a whole, instead of correcting in the heat of the moment if that makes sense. The best thing you can do for both of them is to take them on long walks together during the first few days the dachshund comes home. This will create a bonding experience, as well as an energy outlet for the both of them. They will likely be a bit anxious, so the walk serves a few purposes. After the walk, you can let them play and see how they do. For the first month or so, try to do everything with them as a team. If you feel Kylo is playing too rough, you can make him sit (if possible!) and keep redirecting him until he calms down.

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Lola
Husky
1 Year
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Lola
Husky
1 Year

Good day.

My 2 furry babies used to get along so well they use to play together, sleep together, eat out the same bowl. They where perfectly content with each other. Untill my husky went to the groomers and came back a different dog. She was suddenly very aggressive toward my smaller doggie. She bit her sadly causing her to lose an eye. This happened a few days ago. I am trying to get them reintroduced to each other but the smaller dog being traumatized after the incident is now growling at the big dog every time she comes closer to sniff her. I am frightened it will happen again and be fatal this time. How do I get the love back between them? I am keeping them seperate now and it's a huge challenge. I let them be in the same room if either one is being held to lay next to one of use so the other may Rome free..please help me

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shasha, First, I recommend having your vet take a look at your Husky to see if there is an injury that happened at the groomers that lead to the aggressive outburst. If there is an injury, I would wait until it's heeled before you reintroduce because pup may feel very defensive while in pain still, and the outburst might happen again. Once pup is healed or if there is no injury, I recommend teaching both dogs Place and practicing having them stay on separate place beds on opposite ends of the room. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Have a second person walk one of the dogs and practice the Passing Approach and Walking Together methods from the article I have linked below, then once they are good walking together again, go on structured heeling walks and hikes with them. Passing Approach and Walking Together methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs When one enters the room and both are calm and tolerant, give each a treat without the other dog seeing you rewarding them - you don't want them rushing over to where they other dog is getting food because that can start a food fight. Feed them in separate rooms or crates to remove any food competing. Don't tolerate pushiness toward you from either dog, instead, have them work for what they get in life right now by performing a command like Sit before you feed, toss a ball, give a treat, or pet. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Continue to keep separate when not working with them until they are relaxed around each other again. Crate introduction - if needed: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mondo
Lab mix
6 Years
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Mondo
Lab mix
6 Years

I am moving in with family and they have 2 older toy fox terriers. My dog is 65lb lab/heeler mix. My dog has not been around of a lot of other dogs but is trained with basic commands. I am looking for advice on how to introduce the dogs together. My dog is reactive and barks when he sees other dogs.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Toni, How does pup do when actually meeting other dogs? Are they aggressive then also, or simply reactive on leash? Check out the article linked below and following the Passing Approach method until they dogs can do well with that, then switch to the walking together method, starting far apart again, until the dogs can finally walk together. Do one family dog at a time. I recommend starting this process now if you live close enough, because this will probably take a lot of walks, getting gradually closer overtime to get to the point where they are ready to walk together and greet. Passing Approach and Walking Together methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs For safety, I would get your dog used to wearing a basket muzzle ahead of time also, and have your dog wear the muzzle when not crated around the other dogs early on. Use a basket muzzle so pup can still open their mouth and be given treats through the muzzle's holes. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Once in the home together, the dogs would need to be crate trained and to know a solid 1-2 hour place command. Life would need to be very structured and dogs played with and fed separately, to avoid competition early on. Basically home would be very obedience class-like when they were together, to prevent potential fights. I would work on building trust and respect for you ahead of time also so that they are not making and enforcing rules for each other, but looking to you to do so. You want to add in a lot more structure and boundaries for now, working on things like the working method linked below, teaching both a 2 hour long Place, directional commands like Off, Out (which means leave the area), Down, Leave It, and Off, so that you can tell them where they should and should not be in relation to being pushy with you or bullying each other, and both should be crate trained. Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Keep a drag leash on pup when you are present (and crate when not present) if they won't listen to your directional commands once learned well. Calmly lead pup where you tell them to go as needed by picking up the end of the leash. If you see any signs of aggression toward you, pause and get professional help to deal with aggression toward you also. Training will likely need to be mortified to take extra precautions to keep you safe. Don't risk a bite. If your family is willing, I recommend they teach their dogs things like Place, Out, and Leave It too, incase their dogs try to pester yours and the pestering lead to fights. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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hennessey
Rottweiler Pitbull
2 Years
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hennessey
Rottweiler Pitbull
2 Years

she’s very playful with other dogs and doesn’t realize she’s bigger and intimidating so she plays too rough with our family’s other dogs. how do i calm her down and play less rough

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bella, I suggest practicing something called "Jazz up and Settle Down". Which is a bit like red light, green light for dogs. During training with you, get her a little excited, then command "Stop" or something she knows like "Sit", and freeze. Wait and completely ignore her until she calms back down. As soon as she gets calm or sits, praise and give a treat. Tell her "Let's Play!" again, and start playing and getting her a bit excited again. As soon as she starts to get a little worked up (not too much at first), command "Stop" or "Sit" again, then wait, reward with a treat when she calms down, then continue the game after she is rewarded. Repeat this a few times each training session, then end the session (have lots of frequent shorter sessions throughout the day). As she improves, and can really calm down quickly, let her get a bit more excited before calling Stop. Gradually work up to her becoming more and more excited and having to calm down quickly from a higher level of excitement as she improves. Also, understand that this will take some time and practice. Pups have to learn self-control just like any other skill. This game can help him develop it sooner though. I would also teach pup Out and Leave It, and practice letting her and the most tolerant dog play, practice calling the dogs apart to separate people before they get too wound up, having them perform a few commands to earn treats, then let the other dog go first and see if they want to re-initiate play. If they do, let Hennessey go to with "Go Play" or a similar release word, and repeat letting them play and practicing commands and moving apart with rewards during the play session. It's also okay to teach pup to leave the other dogs alone when they don't want to play, using Leave It and Out commands. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It command from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place - for when pup needs to go lie down quietly with a chew toy, instead of pestering another dog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jack
German Shepherd
2 Years
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Jack
German Shepherd
2 Years

Resource aggressive

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Julia, I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer to help you in person with this issue due to the risk involved and the careful reading of pup's body language that will be required while addressing this. Look for a trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression and who comes well recommended by their previous clients for these type of issues specifically. Ask lots of questions to be sure they have the experience you need before hiring. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Thunder
Siberian Husky
2 Years
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Thunder
Siberian Husky
2 Years

Hi! This is my 2 year old siberian husky who is such a goofball. We go to the dog park and he plays great with bigger dogs. However, if there is ever a small dog he will get in their face and bark and then chase them often rolling on top of them. Once he even put a small dog in his mouth and shook it like a rag doll (he only has done this once). He is not dominant in anyway (I have 2 other huskies and he is the submissive one). Any advice helps! Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hannah, First, I would not let him in the dog park if there are any small dogs there. Some dog parks have small and big dog sections. If so stick to the big dog section and leave whenever a small dog comes. If not, I recommend finding another activity to do with pup in place of the dog park. If you have your own fenced yard, perhaps set up one-on-one playdate with some of his doggie buddies, join a dog walking/hiking group in your area, or a canine sport. It sounds like he may view the small dogs like he would other prey animals, such as cats. I would work on teaching him commands to increase impulse control so that you can call him away from them, but this will be to manage and not to get to the point where he can play safely. I don't recommend allowing him to play safely since this could be something inherit that may not change. Work on a solid recall, teaching him Out and Leave It. Practicing those things with a long training leash, working up to a lot of distractions, including perhaps practicing outside of the dog park, if it's a fenced park, so that he can see the other dogs, including small dogs, but can't get to them, and practice recalling him back to you with the small dogs as distractions in the background, rewarding pup for coming and ignoring the dogs. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Premack principle - more come training: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Your goal here should be to keep pup away from small dogs with management, and to teach pup to ignore small dogs in general with safety measure in place, like the leash. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lulu
Chihuahua
3 Months
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Lulu
Chihuahua
3 Months

We have a Australian cattle dog mix with German shepherd who just turned one and is fixed. We just moved and Scumpi wasn’t himself all the time so thought it would help getting him a friend. Her name is Lulu and she is a chihuahua mixed with miniature pincher who is 3 months old. When first meeting we let them smell each other, but Scumpi did seem to be more aggressive toward Lulu. He has been charging at her and we have used a spray bottle but we just want them to get along. And being that Lulu is so little and Scumpi is bigger it would be easy for him to hurt her. If you have any solutions or any advise on how to help the situation please help.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, start back at day one and take care to have Scumpi and Lulu interact on neutral ground - not at home so much right now. You are right to be careful as Lulu could easily get injured. If Lulu does not have all of her shots and cannot walk around the neighborhood much yet, work on letting these two get to know each other in the back yard, under close supervision of course, and even on a leash. Walk the two of them together (not in close proximity) and as they become familiar, they can gradually become closer together. Be sure to never leave the two unattended. This guide has great tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. All of the methods have important points, so be sure to read it through. And also work on Scumpi's obedience skills: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-whippet. Get his sit, come, and stay down pat so that he obeys when around Lulu. Enroll him in obedience classes as soon as you can. Lulu's safety is very important right now. If you do not have luck, seek a trainer in your area for help. Good luck and all the best to Scumpi and Lulu!

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Arrow
Great Dane/ Blue Tick Hound
3 Years
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Arrow
Great Dane/ Blue Tick Hound
3 Years

My goofy fun loving 3 year old pup is 80 lbs and a lover. We also have a very playful 1 1/2 year old cat. My mom has to rehome her 1 1/2 year old Scottie Dog and we offered to take her since he has known us and our 2 boys since he was 6 weeks old. The boys are 6 and 9 and he plays with the weekly at Nanny's house. He has smelt our dog and cat on us but never has meet them. He is not house trained nor has been around other animals before. Our 3 year old pup has been around other large breeds and but never a smaller breed. Is there any recommendations to make this a smooth transition. I have had Scottish Terriers since I was a baby so I have been around them for 32 years and know that they are a very independent breed and can be stubborn but want to make sure that our furbabies know that this is an addition to our family and that there new baby brother is just more love!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The best thing you can do for everyone is to be all inclusive. So, walks together, feeding time together, play time together. Many folks will pay individual attention to whichever pet in the scenario seems to be struggling with the transition. That just reinforces whatever issues are going on. Unfortunately the cat can't participate in the walks, but walking as a pack is deeply therapeutic for dogs. You will want to plan on taking a nice walk as soon as the Scottie comes home. Then just give everyone some space in the house while they settle in with eachother. It can take up to 30 days or so for dogs to readjust to any sort of change. So just provide support if any of them regress with things they already know. This is normal and everyone will go back to THEIR normal once they adjust a little.

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Sophie
Chihuahua
13 Years
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Sophie
Chihuahua
13 Years

We are trying to introduce a standard schnAUZER TO our 13 year old chihuahua. He only wants to play, but he does not realize he does not realize that he could hurt her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I recommend crate training puppy and either crating them or having them spend time in an exercise pen with durable chew dog food stuffed chew toys when you can't supervise them together at this age. I also recommend teaching Sophie and the puppy Leave It and Out - which means leave the area, and using those commands to direct Sophie and help her learn to give the puppy space when they are getting to excited. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - section on how to teach out and how to use out to deal with pushy behavior too. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Otto
Mix
1 Year
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Otto
Mix
1 Year

Otto is a great dog, we got him about 6 months ago and had him trained and was already neutered when we adopted him. He is very social and loves people and other dogs. We have a dog park on the roof of our building and he has a nice group of dog friends that he will have play dates with as well. Recently, we've noticed that Otto has been getting aggressive with little dogs, either puppies or just small dogs that he hadn't met before that come into the park. He looks as if he becomes more serious, approaches them and will tackle them and bark in their face, he has never bitten another dog, but it looks as if he's trying to assert dominance. He never acts this way with larger dogs. If he does play with dogs his size (~50 lbs.) or larger he can play rough but like I said, has never bitten or injured another dog via their play and he knows when to take a break. We are curious as to why he has gotten this way with smaller dogs, the real surprising part is that there hasn't been any incident that would've caused this and he has gotten aggressive with smaller dogs he has historically been VERY friendly with and love to hang out with. Would love to know why and how to treat this behavior so that we don't have to worry about him meeting smaller dogs and being aggressive.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, good for you for socializing Otto so well. I would enroll him in a dog training class right away. Exposing Otto to dogs of all sizes in a controlled setting is a good idea (be sure to explain Otto's personality change to the trainer when you sign up). In the meantime, work on his obedience: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-dog-basic-obedience. You can also enlist the help of a friend or two with small dogs and have them go with you on pack walks with Otto. Walk at a distance the first few times, gradually getting closer as you walk until they can do so side by side. Yes, it is hard to know why the aggression all of a sudden and hard to know without seeing the body stance and other key signs. Increase his exercise by way of long walks and even runs. There are excellent tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-nice. Basically my advice is to get Otto into a controlled environment for training, add to his exercise regimen, and take walks on neutral territory with small dogs. Call in a trainer if this does not help. The time and expense will be worth the help it can give Otto. Good luck!

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MuMu
Golden Doodle
2 Months
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MuMu
Golden Doodle
2 Months

Hi. I currently have a 5lb maltipoo and recently got a golden doodle who's projected to weight at around 40 pounds. As a 2 month puppy now, he's been chasing my maltipoo and trying to bite her. He also has been trying ambush her in a way. He tries to hide and when my maltipoo comes close, he starts chasing her. What should I do to protect them both? Thanks,

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brandon, It sounds like puppy is trying to play but doesn't know how to be gentle and your older dog can teach boundaries themselves due to the size difference. I suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Also, teach pup Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. To help your older dog feel more confident, whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Marco
Labrador Retriever
9 Years
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Marco
Labrador Retriever
9 Years

Hello, we have 2 dogs. A 14 year old schipperke (16lbs) that we have had for her entire life and a 9ish year old rescue lab mix (85lbs.) that we have had for 7 months. They get along fine, and don’t really interact much other than the occasional sniff, however our lab knows the schipperke is in charge. For instance if Marco the lab drops a toy the Charlotte the schipperke will swoop in and steal it, and he doesn’t seem to care.

My challenge is we would like to add a chihuahua puppy to the pack. Since there is such a size difference I want to be sure our new little guy is safe. Marco isn’t interested in squirrels or chipmunks, so I assume he doesn’t have a high prey drive. But he did meet a Yorkie on a walk, the yorkie didn’t want to sniff noses with him a scooted around quickly, which made Marco more interested. It ended with the yorkie squealing and snapping ( no physical contact was made between the dogs) and me pulling him away.

So I guess my challenge is: how do I introduce the lab and chihuahua? Or should we just not add a small breed puppy to the mix?

Thank you!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! On leash greetings can be tricky to navigate. Dogs often react negatively because they feel they can't get away if needed, even if the greeting is positive. Really the best thing to do is to introduce everyone once you get the new dog, and then do everything as a team for a while. They will learn they are part of a "pack" and co-exist peacefully. I have a labradoodle and a chihuahua and they get along great! The chihuahua wasn't afraid to tell my labradoodle to back off. A few barks and grunts and now the labradoodle is so gentle with her.

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Teddy, Niña, Kashyyyk
toy poodle
14 Years
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Teddy, Niña, Kashyyyk
toy poodle
14 Years

My toy poodle(Teddy) and Chihuahua(Niña) don’t like my new great dane puppy(Kashyyyk). I understand that the size difference and age gap can be overwhelming to them and i should give them time but Teddy is starting to get a little aggressive. Is there a way to get them to get along? What do you recommend?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Esli, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach the dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for the dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward puppy. If pup disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also giving a gentle consequence to the puppy is they antagonized first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to them and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after them while you are home, you can also clip them to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that they have to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that they don’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of their age and size it’s harder for her to handle them and keep up with their energy. She needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from them pestering her, and making the puppy's appearance pleasant for your older dog. I would also work on teaching the dogs the Place command, so that the puppy can be sent to Place when you need calmness throughout pup's life. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Budd
American Bulldog
2 Years
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Budd
American Bulldog
2 Years

I just got me a small dog it's a chorkie and I'm scared to let my bully interact with them because I'm afraid my bully might bite his head off here above is a picture of both dogs

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kayley, How is Budd with other dogs in general? I f pup is normally good with other dogs, I would introduce them using the Passing Approach method from the article linked below and watch Budd's body language while the new dog is further away to see how pup is reacting. Passing Approach: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs If pup has a history of aggression or is reacting badly toward pup while they are further away and you are practicing passing, I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to oversee their interactions, keeping them separate when not training them with each other. You can also desensitize Budd to wearing a basket muzzle for some added safety. I would do this with the new dog not around so the muzzle isn't just associated with the new dog, and use food rewards to introduce the muzzle very gradually over several days, to make the process as comfortable and normal feeling for Budd as possible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s In general, even if they seem to do well together, I would supervise interactions, keeping them separate when you aren't directly supervising, while they are getting to know each other. I would work on teaching things like Place so that both can calmly lie on their on separate Place beds in the same room, away from each other, to calmly get used to just co-existing with pestering one another. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buster
Bullmastiff
7 Years
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Buster
Bullmastiff
7 Years

Hi we recently adopted buster a beautiful loving bullmastiff, he is well behaved and loves humans,at the time of adoption we were told he was good with other dogs so when we were asked to take in a 10 year old king Charles we said OK, on the first meet we took them walking and everything was fine, we brought them into the house things seemed fine for about 45 minutes then buster attacked Charlie without warning biting him and holding him in his mouth,is there any chance these 2 dogs can get along together.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Susan, I highly suggest hiring a professional trainer to evaluate the dogs together in person to determine this. Was the King Charles harmed in the process? Any blood drawn? If so, the odds of them being able to coexist are lower. If the larger dog didn't harm the smaller one even though they could have, the chances of working through this are better, but even if possible, it will take a lot of time and work on your end most likely. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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EMMA
cockapoo
6 Years
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EMMA
cockapoo
6 Years

My rescue always barks and snaps at other dogs she doesnt know while leashed on walks. My brother wants to bring his chow mix over to my house to get them to know each other. He says his dog will be fine because not aggressive. I'm nervous about this. How to introduce these 2.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joan, I recommend introducing them over a series of meetings, only decreasing distance as pup relaxes. Check out the passing approach and walking together method below. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Go at the dogs' pace, being careful and calm. I would not assume your dog wouldn't start a fight with their history. If there are aggressive signs you will need professional help with this. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Axel
Maltese
10 Weeks
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Axel
Maltese
10 Weeks

I recently adopted a Maltese puppy. I also have a standard poodle puppy and I am trying to teach my poodle to be gentle with the new puppy. She is doing decently but she tries to paw at him and that makes him growl at her understandably. I am aware that it was not the smartest idea to get such a small dog with a bigger dog but now I am stuck with my decision.

Can I make this work? Should I rehome the maltese? I would love to keep him if I could but if this is something impossible then I need to know.

Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lizzi, It doesn't sound impossible but you will need to manage their interactions and be the one to enforce rules, keeping them apart when you aren't there, for probably 1-2 years until they both calm down. With the right training and supervision they likely can learn to be respectful of one another's space and needs, you just won't be able to depend on their own interactions apart from you to teach that, because of the size difference. I would work on crate training them, teaching Out - which means leave the area, teaching Leave It, and Place. These commands, once learned, can help them learn when to give space when being too rough. Many large and small dogs get along great as long as proper boundaries are set and enforced, until maturity takes over. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Surprise method - crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I would consider enrolling both in a puppy kindergarten class to help the smaller one learn confidence and the bigger one learn to adapt their play to be gentle. Check out the article linked below on classes. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sigma
Husky
3 Years
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Sigma
Husky
3 Years

I am getting a little corgi puppy and Sigma is very energetic and impatient, well he isn’t trained very well. I want to make sure sigma doesn’t play to rough, he has only be around bigger dogs and it does frighten me a bit to introduce them, is there steps I can take into making there meet a bit easier?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Grae, Taking them on walks together would be a good exercise - especially if the walks are a bit more structured and one dog on either side or two people walking them - so pup can't jump on the older dog or bite them during the walk. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. Before you even bring puppy home, working with your older dog on the following can also help. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Listening and respect building for pup to respond better to you. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you If pup has ever shown any form of aggression toward you or other dogs, I would put the puppy introduction on pause and hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to work with you in person first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Stuart
Labrador Retrier
7 Months
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Stuart
Labrador Retrier
7 Months

We just adopted Stuart, a 7 month old lab mix. He is a good boy in general and with people but he does not seem to like my 8 yr old jack russel mix, Louis. We can't figure out why Stuart will randomly show teeth, growl and snap at Louis. Nothing seems to trigger it. Louis can just be standing there and Stuart will show teeth all of a sudden. We don't let them get to close to each other and Stuart is always on a leash so we can prevent anything bad happening. We are doing our best to work with Stu but it is very frustrating.

Anytime Stu shows teeth we immediately step in and separate them. Whenever they are being good together he gets lots of praise and treats.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alyssa, How much of pup's history do you know? As a rescue its very possible they have never been socialized with other dogs and there is fear aggression. Pup may also have had a traumatic experience with other dogs. Given pup's young age, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to work with you in person to try to make up for some lost time with interactions with other dogs. This is likely a general issue pup has with other dogs, or at least smaller dogs. You could also look into joining a G.R.O.W.L. class if you can find one in your area, which is a class for dog reactive/aggressive dogs, to work on intensive socialization while the dogs wear basket muzzles for safety. In the meantime I would continue to give both dogs space, provide clear boundaries through management like leashes, crates and general separation when you aren't working with both together. Reward for calm, relaxed responses while the other dog is in the room, without the other dog being able to get too close to cause a food fight. Having both dogs go on structured heeling walks together with two people walking them, one for each dog and some space between them can also be a good bonding exercise. Require both dogs to heel though and perform obedience commands during the walk so that the overall energy is calm and focused and respectful toward you. Check out the Walking Together method from the article linked below. At this point, I wouldn't have them come all the way into contact with each other, just travel in the same direction, starting from far enough away for both to be calm, then decreasing it until perhaps they can be on the same side of the room, with enough space between everyone to still keep everyone safe. Again, up close interactions should require a basket muzzle right now, and be aware that a dog that is highly aroused is a threat to bite whoever is closest even if normally fine with people, so a muzzle might be a good idea for that reason too if the aggression warrants it. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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