How to Train Your Chihuahua Dog to Get Along With Other Dogs

Medium
6-12 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Chihuahuas are often known for their stubborn personality. But when it comes to being with their owners, they are sweet and tender dogs. Many Chihuahuas don't often get along with other dogs. They would rather be the sole pet in the house and the only dog on the planet. If you have multiple dogs, you're going to need to teach your Chihuahua to know how to get along with them. You're going to want all of your dogs to be comfortable in your home. If you take your dog out to dog parks or to a pet store, or even to the veterinarian's office, your Chihuahua is going to need to know how to behave and not be overly aggressive. Even a small dog such as your Chihuahua can get into trouble if his attitude is not in check. You don't want to be responsible for your Chihuahua biting another dog because he doesn't know how to get along.

Defining Tasks

The key to teaching your dog to get along with other dogs is to ensure the Chihuahua is social. As early as you can, socialize your Chihuahua. If you get your Chihuahua as a puppy, start as soon as he has all of his shots. You can socialize your puppy Chihuahua with people before his shots are done, but wait until he's had all of his shots before you introduce him to dogs you do not know, such as dogs at the dog park or a pet store. If this is an older Chihuahua, you are rescuing and bringing into your home with other animals, introduce your dogs to your new Chihuahua slowly and methodically. Getting your Chihuahua to be social is key to having him understand how to get along with other dogs. Remember, the commonality between your Chihuahua and other dogs is they will both do just about anything for delicious food. 

Getting Started

Bring your Chihuahua together with other dogs slowly. Be sure to have lots of tasty treats for both dogs. If there are multiple other dogs in your home, you may ask a friend or partner to help with introductions. If you plan to bring your Chihuahua around other dogs outside your home, start with dogs and owners you know. Chihuahuas tend to do best on a harness instead of a collar and leash. If your Chihuahua is aggressive or in danger or harming another dog, pulling him away with a harness is safer than tugging on a leash attached to a neck collar. These little guys can become injured easily with a leash and collar.

The Socialized Chihuahua Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Plan ahead
Plant scheduled social times for your Chihuahua. This should include times with other dogs his size as well as times with other dogs who are larger than he is. Before you head out for social time with your Chihuahua, be sure he has been fed and is well rested and ready for some playtime.
Step
2
Neutral space
Set up a meeting or a playdate with other dogs your dog will be around, but set this up in neutral territory. If you don't know other dogs but you still want your Chihuahua to be social, you can go to a dog park. Just be sure to start with a small dog area before you introduce your Chihuahua to the bigger dogs' area.
Step
3
Harness
Harness your Chihuahua with an appropriate harness and not just a collar and a leash. Be sure the harness is the right size and on your dog correctly.
Step
4
Voice and tone
When you introduce your Chihuahua to a dog you know or a strange dog at a dog park, keep your tone and your voice calm and even. You don't want your Chihuahua to pick up on any anxieties from your voice.
Step
5
Aggression
As long as your dog is properly harnessed, if he shows any aggression at all, you can gently pull back on the harness pulling him away from the other dog. Do not do this if your dog is not wearing a harness and is wearing a leash instead. If you do so with a leash and collar, you run the risk of collapsing his trachea so be sure to harness your Chihuahua.
Step
6
Commands
Before you introduce your Chihuahua to other animals, teach him some commands such as 'sit' and 'down.' You can use these commands as he is meeting new friends. As you're introducing your Chihuahua to another dog, ask your dog to sit. Provide treats for both dogs as they are meeting one another so they can both be rewarded for good behavior and following commands.
Step
7
Ignore
As the two dogs are meeting and greeting, ignore them unless you see either becoming aggressive. Again, your Chihuahua will pick up on any of your anxieties, so if you are playing helicopter dog parent he is going to expect you to save the day instead of working things out on his own. Remember, the goal here is to keep him from being aggressive and get along with new friends.
Step
8
Rewards
Every so often while ignoring the dogs you are socializing, give them each a reward in the form of a treat. Be sure to treat them both at the same time and make it a high-value treat that they will both want to earn again with good behavior.
Step
9
Practice
Practice socializing your dog with several dogs but only one at a time. Making your Chihuahua social around other dogs as well as people will make him a kinder, friendlier dog.
Step
10
Good behavior
Be sure to reward your Chihuahua for good behavior anytime you see him socially interacting with another dog. Having your Chihuahua learn how to socialize will keep him from being so aggressive around other animals.
Recommend training method?

The Conditioning Method

Effective
3 Votes
Step
1
Walk
Harness your Chihuahua and take him on a walk where you know he will see and smell other dogs. You can walk around your neighborhood, go to a dog park, or goto a pet store where you are likely to run into other dogs.
Step
2
Treat
Each time your dog sees another dog, give your Chihuahua a treat.
Step
3
Aggression
If your dog growls or lunges forward toward another dog, distract him with a high-value treat. This is not acknowledging his poor behavior but rather distracting him from his anxieties or fears of the other dog.
Step
4
Practice
Continue to take your Chihuahua near other dogs or in areas where he will see other dogs but not interact with them. Each time your Chihuahua acknowledges the presence of another dog, give him a treat. Do not let the other dogs get close to your dog at this point.
Step
5
Up close
After some practice conditioning your Chihuahua to seeing and being near other dogs, introduce him to a dog you know and trust. This dog can be any size, just make sure it’s one you are familiar with.
Step
6
Neutral territory
Have your Chihuahua and the dog you know and trust meet up in one of the places you and your dog have been visiting.
Step
7
Meeting treats
As both dogs get closer, offer both a treat. You have conditioned your dog to associate treats with other dogs, be sure to continue this conditioning as dogs get closer.
Step
8
Greeting
As long as the dogs are getting closer without aggression, continue to offer them both treats. If your Chihuahua is at all apprehensive about this meeting, give him a treat and walk away with your pup.
Step
9
Keep trying
Keep trying to introduce your Chihuahua to other dogs or the same dog on neutral ground with treats until he allows their interactions to be closer. Each time they meet, try to get them closer and closer. Be patient. If your Chihuahua is aggressive or anxious, it may take time, but he will get it with patience, tolerance, and lots of tasty treats.
Recommend training method?

The Obedience Commands Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Basic commands
As soon as you bring your Chihuahua home, begin to teach him basic obedience commands. This will set the tone for your relationship in the future as well as give you tools to use when he meets other animals or people.
Step
2
'Sit'
As soon as your Chihuahua meets another dog, have him sit.
Step
3
Treat
Once your dog sits, offer him a treat. If he does not sit because he’s on edge with another dog nearby, show him the treat and command him to sit again. Once he sits, give him the treat and treat the other dog as well.
Step
4
Down
Once your dog is sitting and earning treats, have him go into a 'down' position. If the other dog knows this command, have him lie down as well.
Step
5
Reward
Once your Chihuahua is in a down position, offer him a treat. At the same time, give the other dog a treat as well.
Step
6
Eye contact
Allow some time for the two dogs to look at one another and sniff if they choose.
Step
7
Treat again
As they are getting used to one another, offer them both a treat.
Step
8
Repeat
Try to ignore the dogs as they get used to each other. Keep them in a 'sit' or a 'down' position to keep them focused. As long as they are not being aggressive, treat them both.
Step
9
Practice
Use this method each time your dog meets another dog. Always pair a meeting with treats and commands. Consider making the treats you use when with other dogs a bit more high value than training or everyday treats.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 12/19/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Gisela
Chihuahua
15 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Gisela
Chihuahua
15 Months

Have just got another chihuahua female white dog into the family who is 4 months old. We did introduce them for weeks prior to taking her home , he has been ok for most of time although jealous as well . They have been together 3 or so weeks and in just the last two days our male older dog is growling at little one and won’t let her have a treat or play with him. I must say he has been spoilt as an only dog for a year and went everywhere with us so I understand he might be put out . Yet at times he is protective over little Mia and watches over her and at other times growls and is intimidating. He also was used to constant one on one play time and won’t let her play with him and us yet she is so placid she keeps trying to get involved and we are trying to finds ways of helping solve this situation I need some advise on how to handle Thai situation and make for a happy family.
Thanks for any advise given
Gisela Pure

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gisela, There are a couple of things you can do. The first is to work on respect with your older Chihuahua. Most dogs are tolerant of puppies until the puppy gets old enough to be a threat to their dominant status. Which is why your older dog is probably starting to have more issues with the puppy, the puppy is getting older. When a younger dog becomes threatening to an older dog then there will often be fights to establish who is in charge. To prevent the fights your dog needs to view you as the one in charge, to respect you more, and to have you make all of the rules for both dogs, so that your older dog does not have to decide who is in charge and making the rules. To teach respect have both dogs follow at least one of the methods from this article bellow: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you That article talks about Dobermans, but the training will work for your Chihuahua also. As far as being the one to create the rules, decide rules for both dogs and do not let your older or younger dog be the one to decide what the other dog is allowed to do. You make the rules and you enforce the rules, not your dog. The rules might include: "No taking another dog's bone", "No being possessive of people, toys, or food", "No trying to get between the other dog and a person when the person is petting the other", "No fighting the other dog" (Instead you be the one to deal with the other dog when he is causing issues, so the bothered dog does not have to fight), and "No bothering another dog when he does not want to be bothered". When one dog is breaking a rule then make him leave the room and remove whatever that dog wants, such as your attention or treats being given out. Do this for both dogs to make it fair, but make sure your older dog is not getting away with breaking rules because in this situation he is causing most of the problem. Do protect your older dog's space though, and do not let your young dog bother him when he wants to be left alone. Instead distract your young dog with something like a toy or place him into a crate or exercise pen with a fun toy to give him a break if he is too wound up. Also, use your older dog's dog food, or treats, to reward your older dog whenever the younger dog is around, or the young dog is receiving treats, toys, or affection, or when your older dog is generally being nice toward and tolerant of your younger dog. You want your older dog to begin to want your younger dog around, because when the younger dog is around your older dog gets treats. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
June
Chihuahua
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
June
Chihuahua
8 Weeks

I wanted to leave info for both of my dogs. I left info for June the chihuahua above. Johnny is our other dog. He’s a 7 week old Labrador retriever. My husband and I adopted these two from the humane Society (June on April 2nd and Johnny in April 3rd) We had them meet in a neutral place before bringing them home. It was ok but June seemed aggressive towards Johnny. We tried again at home in the backyard and they started play fighting but then it escalated quickly. I became very nervous because June is so small. She seemed more aggressive than Johnny. I’m so worried that we won’t be able to have them get along. I need help ASAP!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, I suggest hiring a trainer who is experienced with puppy play times and puppy kindergarten to evaluate the two puppies together and assess their temperaments. At this age true aggression is rare (but not impossible which is why I suggest an evaluation by a trainer), but some puppies will play overly rough and not give another puppy a break when needed. Personalities often determine who is in charge rather than just size. Once pups have been evaluated and have had a couple of private sessions to determine what is going on, if it's simply June being too rough and not knowing how to take turns being dominant and submissive during play, then I suggest joining a puppy kindergarten class with both pups (two adults need to go so that both pups have a person to supervise, or you can join two separate classes, and go one at a time with the pups). Look for a class that has puppy play time part of the time and the trainer moderates the play to prevent bullying and fear. Pups need a chance to be socialized, build confidence (Johhny more so) and to find out that other puppies won't play with them if they are too rough (June more so likely). It is also important for both dogs to have a lot of structure at home. Work on obedience with both, don't tolerate pushiness (the pushy pup has to leave the room when doing so), and create and enforce house rules for both dogs so that they do not have to for each other. For example, se rules might include: No pup can take another's toy. If they do, you retrieve it from the thief, give it back to who had it first, and make the thief leave the room. No pup can bother another one when they want to sleep. No pup can hover around another one while he is eating. (I suggest feeding both in locked crates to avoid food issues to begin with). No pup can be be possessive of someone or something....they have to leave the room if so. No pup can keep another pup from getting through a door way or entering a room. The goal is to decide what the rules are and expect both puppies to follow them, then you enforce consequences/situations if one puppy is breaking a rule so that the other puppy does not have to act aggressive to enforce the rules themselves or is not bullied and taken advantage of by a more dominant pup. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luna
Chihuahua
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luna
Chihuahua
3 Years

The chihuahua is very aggressive towards the German Shepard.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dolores, I would need a lot more details to be of much help. I suggest checking out Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training on YouTube, and Sean O'Shea from the Good Dog. You may need to hire a trainer who is very experienced with aggression to work with you in person, to assess what type of training method is needed to help him. In general, building respect and trust for you is a good place to start. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Mordie
Chihuahua
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mordie
Chihuahua
5 Years

My adult chihuahua has an uncontrollable aggression toward other dogs, particularly larger dogs.
Often he knows of another dogs presence before I do and is on edge before I can get a handle on it.
He’s fast, very fast and his aggression ranges from intense, fearful barking to attempting to bite the other dog multiple times if he’s able to get near enough.
He isn’t able to be let of his lead at the dog park as he will run toward any dog he sees with this behaviour.
There has been occasions where he has been completely relaxed around unfamiliar dogs and able to be let off the lead. He is better with most smaller dogs that larger dogs.
When he has spent some time and had the opportunity to get to know dogs he’s totally fine, it’s mostly in the street and at the park this happens.
What can I do to stop this? He wants so badly to be able to run around and the park and interact with other dogs but I believe his fear creates his aggression and therefore I just can’t trust him without a lead.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brooke, First, he absolutely needs to stop going to the dog park. That environment is a highly aroused, aggressive, and excited. He likely feels frustrated, stressed, and trapped being their the leash around so many other dogs who can approach him off leash. Since he doesn't have the social skills to handle being off leash there either - which would be equally bad for him since he would bully and fight, he needs to stop going to dog parks right now. For future on going socialization, instead of a dog park see if there is a group that you can go on structured heeling walks with. That type of environment where the walk is structured and he is following you and not competing to be in front is calming, focused, and the exercise releases tension, increases endorphins, and decreases things like adrenaline... Helping him pair other dogs with a calm, happy mindset, instead of an aroused, aggressive, stressed one. If there is a G.R.O.W.L. class within driving distance of you I suggest joining that class. A G.R.O.W.L. class is a class for aggressive or reactive dogs who all wear basket muzzles and are intensively socialized together while practicing things like heel. You can also recruit a friend with a well behaved dog to practice the passing approach, then walking together methods from the article I have linked below. You will correct aggressive outburst, and reward calmness, while practicing a structured heeling walk, passing by the other dog from across the street lots of times. As pup improves, you decrease the distance between the dogs very gradually, until they can handle walking in the same direction from across the street and both dogs can stay calm; at that point you decrease the distance between them again. Practice this with one dog until your dog can calmly walk with that dog, then practice this with new, well-behaved dogs until pup can do group walks with other dogs in a structured heel. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs When pup can handle group structured heeling walks, then see if there is a dog walking or hiking group in your city through something like www.meetup.com, a dog training club, a rescue group, or social gathering group. Always keep safety in mind when meeting up with new groups, and have pup wear a basket muzzle if a bite is possible in that situation. An example of a structured walk with a reactive and aggressive dog: Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Aggressive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Mini mee
Chihuahua
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mini mee
Chihuahua
2 Years

So today I just got another chihuahua pup who is 3 months and my old dog is kind of growling a bit at the pup how do I make them friends?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mrgya, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once pup is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or she has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever she is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give her a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding her though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm her. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup and because of his age it’s harder for her to handle him and keep up with his energy. She needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from him pestering her, and making his appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then she may adjust to puppy's presence as he grows, especially when he calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later! But they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Silky
Chihuahua
8 Years
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Silky
Chihuahua
8 Years

Hello!

This last Monday I got a puppy, about 5 months old. Silky, the 8 year old chihuahua, does not like him at all. He does also try to play with her and she doesn’t like it. She hates when he is near myself or my mother. She tries to bite him and growls and just gets so riled up. It’s only been 4 days now, but I’m scared that if it continues I’ll have to give him away. I don’t want them to get into a huge fight and one gets hurt. She also isn’t really trained, she doesnf listen to any commands. So I’m not sure if there is a way to help the situation.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erica, It sounds like Silky needs to learn respect with a lot of new structure, working for what she gets, and generally creating new house rules for both dogs to follow. The aggression might be a combination of lack of socialization around other dogs (so the new dog is overwhelming at first) and Silky believing that she runs the house and owns the humans in it (which is why she acts aggressively when the puppy tries to approach people). By building Silky's respect for you, showing her that you are handling situations, and desensitizing her to the puppy by making the puppy's presence pleasant through rewards, and rewarding general tolerance of the puppy, you can likely improve her behavior. The training will take work though and without being there in person to evaluate I cannot guarantee how much she will improve. Many dogs improve dramatically around a new puppy when given rules, taught boundaries, desensitized to the new dog, and given time to adapt. If the aggression is severe enough that she is likely to draw blood, I highly suggest you hire a professional trainer to help you in person and to evaluate the two dogs right now before a potential fight occurs. If the threats are simply loud but very controlled, that is likely less dangerous and fairly common with the arrival of a new dog. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Working" method and the "Consistency" method with Silky. Both dogs can benefit from the training if you have time to do it with both dogs. Focus on Silky the most though. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Also, create household rules for both dogs and be the one to enforce the rules for both dogs, so that neither dog has to enforce anything for the other dog. Some good rules include: "No dog is allowed to act possessive of people or things (If they do, they have to leave the room). "No dog is allowed to block a dog from going through a doorway or getting to an area". "No dog is allowed to be pushy for attention (nudging hands, barking, or jumping onto laps without being invited first. Instead have the dog do something like "Sit" first and make the dog leave if they do not listen and are still pushy). "No dog is allowed to take another dog's toy (If they do, take the toy from the thief, return it to the dog it was stolen from, and make the offender leave the area). "No dog is allowed to hover around or steal another dogs' food (I suggest feeding both dogs in separate crates to prevent any potential food aggression from starting, then both dogs can eat and feel relaxed about their food - eating in a crate is good for almost any dog). "No dog is allowed to act aggressively toward another dog" (Make the offender leave and stay out of the room). "No dog is allowed to beg for people food" (competing for food near one another is asking for trouble right now). "No dog is allowed to bother another dog when they want to be left alone" (Keep the puppy from bothering your other dog so that your older dog can relax, until the puppy learns to be more polite about it, and reward Silky for being tolerant when the puppy is calmly trying to say hi or generally near silky and Silky is nice). "Both dogs have to get off furniture when told 'Off'." - teach both dogs what this command means. If either dog is guarding the furniture or refuses to get off, they are not allowed on the furniture until their attitude changes. When the puppy enters the room and Silky stays calm, reward Silky with a treat or toy. When the puppy gets near Silky and Silky stays calm, also reward Silky with a treat. Stop giving treats when the puppy leaves. You want to associate the puppy's presence with treats and for the treats to stop when the puppy leaves, so that Silky will want her to stay. This will help desensitize her to the puppy's presence. If you feel like you need more help, I suggest finding a trainer who uses both positive reinforcement and fair corrections who will do the training above, including the rewards for tolerating the puppy and helping you implement more rules and structure for Silky. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Freddy and cocco
Chihuahua
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Freddy and cocco
Chihuahua
2 Months

Im thinking of getting 2 chiwawa puppies from 2 different litters from the same breeders, is this likely to be more difficult to train , also do you reccomend I get a boy and a girl or 2 boys which is what I'd rather?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sian, Whether getting two pups at the same time is a good idea or not depends a lot on how much time and work you are able to give. Getting two puppies at once tends to be more than twice as much work at one pup. Pups will tend to get into more trouble together and be rougher and less calm together than if you just had one puppy. With cats many people get two so that they can keep each other company and in some ways cats are even easier in pairs. With dogs it isn't less work, it tends to be more than twice as much work with two. For some people this is fine though and they are up to the challenge. Just keep in mind that the pups will each need to be taken potty every hour, will both wake up 1-2 times to be taken potty in the middle of the night at first, will both need to be crate trained - which can involve some crying at first (so double crying). Both will need to be taught things like using their mouths gently and be supervised constantly when free to prevent accidents, destructive chewing, and keep them safe while young. Most importantly, you will need to make time for both puppies to be thoroughly socialized and there is a very specific age window for this (until 16 weeks) when pups need to be taken (carried to avoid disease exposure on the ground) as many places as you can, introduced to lots of people in a positive way, and ideally enrolled in a puppy kindergarten class that has time for off-leash play with other puppies so that they learn to be social with other dogs (one other puppy in the house won't accomplish this on it's own). Socialization is the greatest factor besides genetics on temperament and preventing temperament issues later on so it's extremely important and takes a lot of time those first few weeks and can't be postponed because it's age dependent. Check out the free pdf e-books that can be downloaded at the link below, BEFORE You Get Your Puppy and AFTER You Get Your Puppy for information on puppy raising to give you a good idea of where to start and what to expect if you haven't raised a puppy before. Its a great resource to check out even if you have raised puppies before - it was written by the man who pioneered starting puppy classes at a younger age and co founded the association of professional dog trainers. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads If you feel up for all of that, a male and female are less likely to fight with each other once they hit sexual maturity. The biggest factor will be individual personalities though - try choosing puppies that are neither super submissive nor very dominant - middle of the road puppies. Avoid the puppies who are timid and scared and the puppies who bite and jump a lot - look for the puppies who are friendly and happy but not as rough - they will likely be the easiest puppies to raise with a second puppy around. If you get two males, neutering will be especially important but neutering won't stop all competing - there will probably be a need for good leadership and structure in your house to avoid confrontations as they get older. A male and female will still be work but they just tend to be less of a direct challenge to each other - either way look for those middle of the road temperament puppies. If you decide to wait to adopt a second pup, generally two years of age is the soonest I would add a second dog to let the first dog calm down a bit and get past all the destructive chewing phases and become trained. Spend a whole lot of time socializing the first pup with other puppies, people and dogs during the first year of life to ensure pup will adjust well to a new puppy later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Peanut
Chihuahua
4 Years
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Peanut
Chihuahua
4 Years

Just got a pit puppy and my chihuahua keeps growling or running away from the puppy. It's been 3 weeks and he is still aggressive towards him. Both are Male. Any tips to get them to get along better before they pit gets any bigger.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chelsie, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in later and prevent dangerous destructive chewing habits that happen without confinement. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once pup is crate trained then life with both dogs can be a lot easier for everyone. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. While you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup for antagonizing if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever your older dog is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give Peanut a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm. Right now your older dog probably feels overwhelmed by pup. He needs to feel like you are the one managing puppy, protecting your older dog from him pestering him, and making his appearance pleasant for your older dog. If you can take the pressure off of their relationship and help their interactions to be calmer, then he may adjust to puppy's presence as he grows, especially when he calms down when older. Don’t expect them to be best friends. The goal right now is calm, peaceful coexistence. They may end up bonding and enjoy each others company as adults later but they don’t have to play or be thrilled right now. I find that about half of all older dogs find new puppies stressful at first. Many do adjust as puppy matures though and may even become buddies - you have to add structure and boundaries to help their relationship be calmer and not force interactions though. I would also teach both dogs the Place command and use that to facilitate them learning to calmly coexist in the same room with some boundaries by having them both stay on separate Place beds in the same room. Finally, if you feel overwhelmed, things are getting worse, or there is a bite, then I would seek professional in-person help from a qualified trainer who has a lot of experience with aggression and comes well recommended by their previous clients whose dogs also dealt with aggression. Aggression is something best addressed immediately or it can get worse, so if you feel good about working through it yourself you can try the above suggestions, but if you are not seeing improvement or feel overwhelmed by it, then you may want to hire someone who is very experienced with aggression to come to your home and help one-on-one with you (obedience classes aren't enough - you need someone who has a lot of experience with behavior issues to address it with the dogs and teach you how to manage it in real time). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nala
Chihuahua
10 Years
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Nala
Chihuahua
10 Years

My older dog is very protective and has never been the social type dog. She did do well 2 years ago when we had a dachshund but he passed on and she has been alone the last 2 years. We just a got a new cheweenie and she is not being nice! She growls when he comes near her or if she is near me and he comes around she shows her teeth! She has had a hurt leg on top of this so her patience is lacking...because of her age is there any chance at all I can get her to accept him? I dont know what else to do. They each have there own food and water dishes and individual kennels because I knew this was going to be a serious adjustment for Nala the older dog. Please Help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Abbie, If you feel overwhelmed, things are getting worse, or there is a bite, then I would seek professional help. Aggression is something best addressed immediately or it can get worse, so if you feel good about working through it yourself you can try the below suggestions, but if you are not seeing improvement or feel overwhelmed by it, then you may want to hire someone who is very experienced with aggression to come to your home and help one-on-one with you (obedience classes aren't enough - you need someone who has a lot of experience with behavior issues to address it with the dogs and teach you how to manage it in real time). Work on taking the pressure off of both dogs to be in charge and in control by mediating situations for them, work on commands that improve calmness and self-control, and make and enforce the rules so that the dogs are not working it out themselves - you are telling them how to react and behave in a calm but firm way. I suggest teaching both dogs Out (which means leave the area) and Place - which is similar to Stay but on a certain spot and they can sit, stand, or lie down but can't get off the spot. Practicing Place with both dogs in the same room on separate place beds can help facilitate calmness around each other and respect for you. Out is great for giving direction and giving a consequence of leaving the room when there is pushiness or mild resource guarding. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo I also suggest crate training both dogs so that they can have a calm place to chew on a chew toy away from each other when things are tense, or one dog is pestering the other, or you are not home to supervise while they are still getting to know each other. Crate training is an important potty training and safety measure for a young pup also. If you don't feel you can do this with your older dog, definitely at least do it with puppy. An open crate while you are home can also serve as an additional Place to practice, and feeding both dogs in separate locked crates can prevent food resource guarding and remove stress around mealtimes! Crate Manners - great calmness and gentle respect building exercise : https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem, you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your other dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If he obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your other dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your other dog. If your older dog pushes pup or gets between you and pup uninvited, tell your older dog Out and enforce her leaving. When she is waiting for her turn patiently, then send pup to place and invite Nala over - no demanding of attention right now from either dog. Make them wait or do a command first to work for your attention since possessiveness is an issue, and make them leave if being pushy or aggressive. If your older dog growls at pup, make her leave the room while also carefully disciplining pup if pup antagonized her first. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your dogs - you want them to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for them to learn respect for each other because you have taught it to them and not because they have used aggression. When pup first enters the room, give your older dog a treat without pup seeing so pup is associated with good things for your older dog - treats stop when pup leaves. When your older dog is being calm, tolerant, and friendly without acting dominant and pushy toward pup, you can also calmly give a treat. Keep the energy calm when interacting with the dogs. Don't feel sorry for either dog but give clear boundaries instead. Don't expect them to be best friends right now - the goal is calm co-existence. When puppy matures and they have learned good manners around each other, they may decide to be friends as adults, but calmness, tolerance, and co-existence comes first. Again, don't wait to get in person help from someone qualified with this type of behavior (ask questions not all trainers are experienced with aggression), if things are getting worse, you feel overwhelmed, or there is a bite. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jackie
Chihuahua Peking
5 Days
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Jackie
Chihuahua Peking
5 Days

I want to get her ready to met my fiance dog who is a pit bull and he is 5. How do I do that?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question and the cute picture. Firstly, make sure that your boyfriend's dog is well socialized and used to seeing and interacting with small dogs. A controlled introduction between any dogs is always key. Take a look through these guides for a method that suits Jackie: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs-1 and https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs (the Walking Approach Method may be ideal). Have the dogs meet in a neutral location like the dog park, or take them on a walk together several times so that they can get to know each other without the immediate need to be in a confined space. Then, gradually let them meet (if there are no aggression issues showing). Good luck!

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Bentley
Chihuahua
9 Years
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Bentley
Chihuahua
9 Years

Will be adding a male puppy in april. Our 9 year old chihuahua is not aggressive towards other dogs - gets nervous and hides but is aggressive towards people. what will be the best way to introduce them?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. It is a good thing that Bentley is not aggressive toward other dogs, but if he is nervous of other dogs, bringing in a puppy may prove to be a challenge at first. Be sure to give Bentley the same attention as always and continue to play with him and walk him as you always have. Remember to crate train your new puppy so that the house stays relatively peaceful for Bentley, and he can adjust gradually. For training the puppy, there are great suggestions here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Make sure that Bentley has a space that he can call his own and retreat to when he wants. Take a look here for tips on introducing the two:https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-puppy. A puppy will be a big change, so it's crucial to keep the same routines and continue individual attention so that there is no resentment. Good luck!

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Bear
Chihuahua
22 Months
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Bear
Chihuahua
22 Months

Bear gets along with my daughter's dogs, but he only sees them every couple of months. So we rescued a new Chihuahua puppy 12 weeks old. Brought her home and Bear would rather have her for lunch then play with her. He is very aggressive towards her. He has always been aggressive towards strangers in our home, but not outside of the home. He gets along with my daughter's dogs, why not the new Chihuahua puppy?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mary, At this level of aggression I do suggest hiring a private trainer who will come to your home to help with the training in person. Look for someone who comes very well recommended by previous clients, ask lots of questions about their training experience with this type of thing, and find someone who is experienced with a variety or types of aggression and knows puppies also. A puppy is different than adult dogs - Bear's aggression may be related to the puppy's age and pup's lack of social cues and boundaries (since puppies are still learning those things). It could be prey drive toward puppy - which is rare so less likely. It could be because he is jealous of a puppy receiving affection, resources, ect.. It could be due to the specific differences in their personalities (some dogs get along better with certain temperaments of dogs, and not with others). It could also be that he realizes he can bully the puppy and pup can't hold it's own - whereas a bit of healthy fear and respect keep him from doing so with the family dogs. Whatever the reason, hire professional help since it sounds like the aggression is more serious, and my main concern is pup's safety and socialization. Take precautions like crating both dogs, having pup be in an exercises pen, and keeping dogs on leashes. Work on building your older dog's respect for you - through things like a Place command, Down-Stay, structured heel, having Bear perform a command first before you give him anything right now - like Sit before petting, Down before feeding, Wait before exiting the door for a walk, and Heel while walking. Don't allow Bear or puppy to stand on your lap, Bear get between you and puppy, or display any other guarding behavior - send them out of the room if they try. Feed the dogs in separate locked crates to avoid food fights and stress around food that could lead to resource guarding later. Don't pet or feel sorry for the older dog when whey are displaying aggression - give clear boundaries instead, and reward calmness, tolerance, and friendliness toward the puppy only - with affection, praise and treats. Give both dogs space from each other, letting them practice calmness and co-existence in the same house without forcing interactions and without letting them "work it out for themselves" - this is not a safe or effective time for that with your particular dogs. Try to keep your interactions calm with both dogs to help both dogs do the same. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Darcy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
3 Years
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Darcy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
3 Years

Darcy is my Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who is a neutered female, 3.5 years old, friendly but cautious / nervous at the same time. When we meet dogs on our walk she is happy to say hello but appears timid / submissive. She used to live with a labradoodle until she passed away 18 months ago. I am looking at getting an 8 week old male chihuahua and am after tips as I have read chihuahuas can be snappy. Everything I can find online is about bringing a dog home into a house where a Chihuaha is already present. However, I would like to know how this would work the other way round. Would a Chihuahua puppy grow up with the Cavalier happily or will still be snappy? I haven't commited to buying a puppy yet, I am trying to make sure I do my homework first.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, As far as the snappiness, spend a lot of time looking for a breeder who breeds for friendly temperaments in their dogs. Try to meet both mom and dad dog because temperament is often inherited from parents and grandparents to a certain extent. When choosing which puppy, choose a calmer pup, who is neither overly bold and rough nor timid and fearful - look for a happy, friendly pup who is curious but not the most boisterous in the bunch either, and not fearful. Wait until pup is 8 weeks of age to bring home so they don't miss out on social interaction with mom and siblings, but are still young enough to bond easily with you - people. When you bring pup home, join a puppy kindergarten class or play group to help pup learn social skills around other dogs - puppies learn those best by playing with other puppies. Check out the free PDF e-books BEFORE You Get Your Puppy and AFTER You GET Your Puppy, which can be downloaded at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads When you do bring pup home, crate train them. Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or hide. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When puppy first enters the room or your catch your dog being especially calm or tolerant of pup, reward your older dog with a treat to help her associate the puppy with good things - without pup seeing, so she doesn't rush over and overwhelm your older dog. They likely won't be play buddies at first, which is fine, but do encourage calm, peaceful co-existence and be the one in charge of teaching pup manners and helping everyone feel more tolerant and peaceful, then when puppy gets older, your dog may decide they want to initiate play once pup is calmer. If they simply hang out and never play, that's fine though. Provide that interaction for pup with other puppies elsewhere. Older dogs don't play the same way as puppies. As long as their relationship is tolerant and peaceful. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cupcake
Chihuahua
20 Years
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Cupcake
Chihuahua
20 Years

My dog is a senior doggy. I don't know how old, I was kind of guessing when they asked for her age but she's been with me for a long time. Every time I take her out, we roam around the neighborhood with nobody around but whenever she sees people or other dogs she barks a lot. I've tried putting a treat in front of her but she continues to barks and lunges. She wasn't super socialized as a young pup that's probably a big reason why. I've tried to sit in front of my house and wait for other dogs and people to walk by and I give her a treat and say "Quiet" I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I've watched tons and tons of videos about training a dog to not bark. Any advice? She doesn't know stay either.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. I am going to send you some training exercises you can use to help make your walks or outings a bit more peaceful. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what he is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell the dog, sit, "watch me" or whatever command you want to use for this exercise. Remember to go slowly. You will see a significant change in his behavior after a month of consistent practice.

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edna
Chihuahua
6 Years
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edna
Chihuahua
6 Years

We recently got a new dog and Edna does not approve of the new puppy. How do I get her used to the puppy.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your best bet with all of this is to force them to do everything together. I know that sounds a little remedial, but Edna needs to know that the puppy is a normal part of life now and when she sees the puppy partaking in all of the daily routines, she will start to enjoy the puppy more each day. Walking them together is crucial. Quick walks around the block together, or longer walks if everyone is up for it.

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Mia
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Mia
Chihuahua
2 Years

Hi, I have just read the way to train a Chihuahua she is already 2 years old is it to late to train her to like other dogs. Really struggling I take her to park 2 times a day and then for short walks 3 times a day. She runs away when other days come near her and doesn't like people much.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. She is cute! It is definitely not too late to teach her to like other dogs. It may take a little longer than if she were a puppy, but she will learn! Most reactivity towards other dogs or people comes from fear. So we need to teach her to associate positives with other dogs. Using treats is usually the best way to go. We teach her that when other dogs appear, so do delicious treats! She will quickly start to pick up on that positive association and become excited by other dogs. Start taking her out, and tossing some treats near her when other dogs approach. Or you can feed her by hand.

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Dorito
Chihuahua
6 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Dorito
Chihuahua
6 Years

I rescued Dorito and gave him to my girlfriend. He’s a great very chill pup. I have since rescued a new puppy that is a lab mix. She’s 7 months and so seeet and playful and Dorito just snaps at her and growls and treats her terribly. All she wants to do is play with him and he doesn’t want any of it. What do i do now that they’re living together?!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jesse, First, I highly suggest crate training the puppy. The crate can help prevent future separation anxiety issues, dangerous destructive chewing habits, and other issues. Almost all puppies will cry the first two weeks of crate training - it is new to them and they have to be given the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain to prepare them for environments they will have to be in late. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed. Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when she is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If she obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make her leave the room while also disciplining pup if needed. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want her to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a create before they respond poorly. Whenever you catch them being calm and tolerant near pup, also reward. Reward without puppy seeing, so that she doesn't run over and overwhelm the older dog - which could lead to a food fight. Don't expect them to be best friends. Work toward calm co-existence. Many dogs will come to like each other later if you set boundaries and help the process while young. It will often take pup becoming calmer as they age though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bandit
Chihuahua
10 Months
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Bandit
Chihuahua
10 Months

How do I get him not to bark at my neighbors because I live in an apartment he barks at any sound he hears people coming in and out?? He barks at any sound he hears the mailman, people coming in to visit,

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shellie, Check out the videos linked below on desensitization. Desensitization method and Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking videos for desensitization examples: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp_l9C1yT1g When you are away, you may also need either a high quality bark collar (not citronella though because the smell lingers making it confusing for pup), or an automatic treat dispensing device, that can be set up to reward pup for quietness, such as a Pet Tutor or AutoTrainer device - make sure its one that can be set to detect quietness and reward then. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Petra
chiwawa pecanese mix
4 Years
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Petra
chiwawa pecanese mix
4 Years

My challenge is she does not get to socialize with other dogs she gets along with some but not a lot what can I do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I recommend looking for a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area. Which is a class for dog reactive/aggressive dogs, who are intensively socialized together in a structured environment while wearing basket muzzles, which are introduced ahead of time. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s I also recommend practicing the Passing Approach and Walking Together methods from the article linked below with lots of different friends and their well socialized dogs, one at a time if pup is safe enough to walk with another dog - if not wait until pup is doing better after a G.R.O.W.L. class then you can continue their socialization with walks. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Emma
Chihuahua
4 Years
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Emma
Chihuahua
4 Years

She has separation anxiety . How can I leave her and reassure her I’ll return.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. Because this behavior issue is complex, I have a lot of information to send you. With some time and practice, this is something that can be turned around over the next month or so. The first step in treating separation anxiety is to break the cycle of anxiety. Every time a dog with separation anxiety becomes anxious when their owner leaves, the distress they feel is reinforced until they become absolutely frantic any time they are left alone. Owners should give the dog an acceptable item to chew, such as a long lasting food treat when they go out. The goal is to have the dog associate this special treat with the owner’s departure. Treats might include hollow bones stuffed with peanut butter or soft cheese, drilled out nylon bones, or hollow rubber chew toys such as Kong toys with similar enhancements (place these in the freezer before giving them to your dog to make them last longer). Give the bone to your dog about 15 minutes before preparing to depart. The chew toy should be used only as a reward to offset the anxiety triggered by your departure. Hiding a variety of these delectable food treats throughout the house may occupy the dog so that the owner’s departure is less stressful. In an effort to prevent destructive behavior, many owners confine their dog in a crate or behind a gate. For dogs that display “barrier frustration,” the use of a crate in this way is counterproductive. Many dogs will physically injure themselves while attempting to escape such confinement. Careful efforts to desensitize and counter condition the dog to crate confinement before leaving them alone may be helpful in some cases. However, some dogs rebel against any form of restraint, including restricting barriers and, for them, crate training may never be a positive experience. Crate training and utilizing the crate while people are home can be a positive way to make the crate a safe place. If you utilize it when people are around, your dog won’t necessarily associate the crate with departure and being left alone. Creating nap time in the crate throughout the day can also be helpful. Building Independence Independence training can help fight separation anxiety and loneliness. Independence training can help build confidence and instill obedience. “Doggie Daycare” or hiring a pet sitter may be a better alternative for dogs that are initially resistant to treatment. It can be expensive, but prices vary. Independence training is one of the more important aspects of the program. It involves teaching your dog to “stand on their own four feet” when you are present, with the express intention that their newfound confidence will spill over into times when you are away. You need to make your dog more independent by reducing the bond between both of you to a more healthy level of involvement. Decreasing the bond is the hardest thing for owners to accept. Most people acquire dogs because they want a strong relationship with them. However, you have to accept that the anxiety your dog experiences in your absence is destructive. Essential components of the independence training program are as follows: Your dog can be with you, but the amount of interaction time should be reduced, especially where attention-seeking behaviors are concerned. You should initiate all interactions with your dog, and they shouldn’t be permitted to demand attention. If you give your dog attention every time they whine, it helps to foster the dog’s dependence on you and increases its anxiety in your absence. You should ignore your dog completely when they engage in attention-seeking behavior, and avoid catering to them when they appear to feel anxious. This means no eye contact, no pushing away, and no soothing talk or body language, all of which will reward their attention-seeking mission. Attention is encouraged only when your dog is sitting or lying calmly. The goal is not to ignore your dog, but to stop reinforcing attention-seeking behaviors so that your dog develops a sense of independence. Minimize the extent to which your dog follows you by teaching them to remain relaxed in one spot, such as their bed. To accomplish this, it is helpful if you train them to perform a sit-stay or down-stay while gradually increasing the time that they hold the command and remain at a distance from you. Providing a treat or toy and encouraging individual play time can be helpful. Once your dog has learned basic obedience commands, you can train them to hold long down-stays while you move progressively farther away. First, your dog should be trained to perform a “down-stay” on a mat or dog bed using a specific command, such as “lie down.” Your dog may have to be gently escorted to the designated spot the first few times. Initially, they should be rewarded every 10 seconds for remaining there, then every 20 seconds, 30 seconds, and so on. Once they have figured out what is wanted, you should switch to an intermittent schedule of reinforcement [reward], as this will strengthen the learned response. Each time your dog breaks their “stay,” issue a verbal correction, indicating that there will be no reward, and then escort them back to their bed. First, your dog can be made to “down-stay” while you are in the room. Next, they can be asked to stay when you are outside of the room, but nearby. The distance and time you are away from your dog can be increased progressively until your dog can remain in a down-stay for 20 to 30 minutes in your absence. Your dog should be warmly praised for compliance. Of course, they need to accept the praise without breaking the stay. Your dog should become accustomed to being separated from you when you are home for varying lengths of time and at different times of day. You can set up child gates to deny your dog access into the room you’re occupying (i.e. reading, watching television, or cooking). Instruct your dog to lie down and stay on a dog bed outside the room. As previously mentioned, you can provide an extended-release food treat or toy to keep your dog calm and distracted. Once they are able to tolerate being separated from you by a child gate, you can graduate to shutting the door to the room so your dog cannot see you. Allowing a dog to sleep in bed with the family can increase dependence. If you decide to prevent your dog from sleeping in your bed, there are some steps to take to establish this routine. First, you need to train your dog to sleep in their own bed on the floor in your bedroom. They may have to be taken to their bed several times before they get the message that you really want them to sleep in their own bed. Alternatively, you can train your dog to enjoy sleeping in a crate to prevent unwanted excursions. Do not use a crate if it causes more anxiety and distress for your dog. Once they tolerate sleeping in their own bed in your bedroom, you can move their bed outside of the bedroom and use a child gate or barrier to keep them out. Always remember to reward your dog with praise or a food treat for remaining in their bed. Develop Departure Techniques Many owners erroneously feel that if separation is so stressful, then they should spend more time with their dog before leaving. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the condition. Everyone in the family should ignore your dog for 15 to 20 minutes before leaving the house and for at least 10 to 20 minutes after returning home. Alternatively, your leaving can be made a highlight of your dog’s day by making it a “happy time” and the time at which they are fed. Departures should be quick and quiet. When departures (and returns) generate less anxiety (and excitement), your dog will begin to feel less tension in your absence. Remember to reward calm behavior. Teach your dog that your departure and return are just normal parts of the day and are not times to be stressed. You should attempt to randomize the cues indicating that you are preparing to leave. Changing the cues may take some trial and error. Some cues mean nothing to a dog, while others trigger anxiety. Make a list of the things you normally do before leaving for the day (and anxiety occurs) and the things done before a short time out (and no anxiety occurs).Then mix up the cues. For example, if your dog is fine when you go downstairs to do the laundry, you can try taking the laundry basket with you when you leave for work. If your dog becomes anxious when you pick up your keys or put on a coat, you should practice these things when you are not really leaving. You can, for example, stand up, put on a coat or pick up your car keys during television commercials, and then sit down again. You can also open and shut doors while you are home when you do not intend to leave. Entering and exiting through various doors when leaving and returning can also mix up cues for your dog. When you are actually leaving, you should try not to give any cues to this effect. Leave your coat in the car and put your keys in the ignition well before leaving. It is important to randomize all the cues indicating departure (clothing, physical and vocal signals, interactions with family members, other pets, and so on). The planned departure technique can be very effective for some dogs. This program is recommended only under special circumstances because it requires that you never leave your dog alone during the entire retraining period, which can be weeks or months. Timing is everything when implementing this program. If your dog shows signs of anxiety (pacing, panting, barking excessively) the instant you walk out of the door, you should stand outside the door and wait until your dog is quiet for three seconds. Then go back inside quickly and reward your dog for being calm. If you return WHEN your dog is anxious, this reinforces your dog’s tendency to display the behavior, because it has the desired effect of reuniting the “pack” members. The goal is for your dog to connect being calm and relaxed with your return. Gradually work up to slightly longer departures 5 to 10 minutes as long as your dog remains quiet, and continue in this fashion. Eventually, you should be able to leave for the day without your dog becoming anxious when you depart. When performed correctly, this program can be very helpful in resolving separation anxiety. Other Treatment Options Obedience Training Obedience training helps to instill confidence and independence in your dog. You should spend 5 to 10 minutes daily training your dog to obey one-word commands. It may be helpful to have training sessions occur in the room where your dog will be left when you are gone. All positive experiences (food, toys, sleep, training, and attention) should be associated with this area of the home. Exercise Your dog should receive 15 to 20 minutes of sustained aerobic exercise once, preferably twice, per day. It is often helpful to exercise your dog before you leave for the day. Exercise helps to dissipate anxiety and provides constructive interaction between you and your dog. It is best to allow your dog 15 to 20 minutes to calm down before you depart. Fetching a ball is good exercise, as is going for a brisk walk or run with your dog on a leash. Even if your dog has a large yard to run in all day, the aerobic exercise will be beneficial since most dogs will not tire themselves if left to their own devices. This is incredibly helpful in dogs that are working breeds that need a job to expend energy and work their brains. Supplements Recently, supplements have been released to the public that can help dogs with anxiety. Purina created a probiotic that has been shown to reduce anxiety and provide a calming effect on some dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this product for treating anxiety, or other products that contain L-Theanine or L-tryptophan.

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Coco
Chihuahua
4 Years
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Coco
Chihuahua
4 Years

My chihuahua has lived with multiple owners and has a few issues. I'm not sure which 2 tackle 1st. She barks at everyone and it takes her a while to accept certain people. Some she is good with quickly, others it can take weeks, if not months.
Her other issue is we have a German Shepherd and she hates him. Sometimes he tries to be nice and play with her but she almost always barks and growls at him.
She doesn't know any commands.
I've always had trouble dissaplining animals and children, i guess u could call me a push over.
What should I do??

Thanks for reading my problems and I hope you can help me.

Sue

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Suzanne, First, check out the article linked below. You will find some methods for building respect without having to be too harsh. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Working on building pup's respect for you can help pup feel more secure and listen better, so that is a good place to start. Second, check out the article I have linked below and the section on shy dogs and humans: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ Finally, check out the youtube channel I have linked below, with videos about reactivity and barking: Channel: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Guests: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Strangers on Walks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXCELHDT2fs&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=4&t=10s Here are a few resources for commands that can help build respect, direct her around you other dog, and make management easier, while also building pup's confidence, respect, and trust for you, and exercising pup mentally. I would prioritize Off, Quiet, and Out in your case. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Off- section on The Off command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cookie
Chiuahua
1 Month
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Cookie
Chiuahua
1 Month

I have a 3 year english bull terrier male and im having a 1,5 month chiuahua female in the next 15 days, the bull terrier gets along with other dogs but a litle raw while playing, do you have some tips to introduce the new member chiuahua to my bull terrier ? Thanks in advance

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carlos, When pup is a bit older, a good way to help them bond is by taking them on walks together - especially if the walks are a bit more structured and one dog on either side or two people walking them separately - so pup can't jump on the older dog or bite them during the walk. Since pup is small, I recommend doing this in your own yard or locations where other dogs aren't likely to have gone, until pup is fully vaccinated. Right now, whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that she doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy when a bit older, and using an exercise pen in a room that can be closed off from your older dog when you can't supervise them together. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help her learn to be calm in the crate and pen. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave or use the exercise pen with some toys in it When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after her while you are home, you can also clip her to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that she has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog and your older dog not giving puppy enough space). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward her. If she disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to her, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to her and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. Because of the age and size difference, I would encourage calmness and both dogs giving each other space to prevent any aggression or roughhousing while pup is very young. Encourage calm coexistance right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Piper
Chiweenie
1 Year
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Piper
Chiweenie
1 Year

She was attack at 9 months old by a Boston terror the same age now she is scared to death of any dog

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danell, For extreme fearfulness I recommend working with a professional trainer or behaviorist in person. Look for someone who specializes in behavior issues like fear and trauma. I also recommend learning more about counter conditioning and desensitization. Check out the Youtube channel I have linked below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbhM4oKZjsE&list=PLXtcKXk-QWoivpkvXgqhAC44tlofiw-CS&index=6 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocco
Chihuahua
4 Years
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Rocco
Chihuahua
4 Years

Does not like other dogs or people outside of family. When we got Rocco he was 8 weeks old. We had a 6 year old shetland sheep dog. Rocco was wonderful with him from day 1. But he barks and lunges and other dogs and people when outside. If we try to correct with a treat he cant focus. Its like he goes into a zone of his own.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Excitement can sometimes be fear based. And based on your description, it does sound a little bit like anxiety and he just doesn't quite know how to communicate! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Romeo
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Romeo
Chihuahua
2 Years

I just got a female chihuahua but my male chihuahua is not having it. He is very aggressive, so much so that I am thinking of returning the female puppy to her original owner.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanda, For what you are describing I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and will work with you in your own home with the dogs. Look for someone who comes well recommended by their clients. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Remy
Chihuahua
10 Years
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Remy
Chihuahua
10 Years

We are getting a new 2-year-old large dog. I would like tips on how to introduce and tips for the adjustment. Remy has always been an only dog.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nancy, Check out the article linked below and following the Passing Approach method until they dogs can do well with that, then switch to the walking together method, starting far apart again, until the dogs can finally walk together. I recommend starting this process now if you live close enough to your future family dog, to help them get used to each other ahead of time if that's an option. If it's not an option, and either dog is unsure about other dogs, keep them separate when you aren't working with them on training in the home at first, and practice these types of interactions to let them get to know each other. Passing Approach and Walking Together methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Once in the home together, I would crate train both and teach them both a solid place command, working up to being able to stay on their separate place beds for 1 hour at a time in the same room as each other, to facilitate giving each other space and calmly getting to know each other. I would initially play with and feed them separately, to avoid competition early on. Basically home would be very obedience class-like when they were together. I would work on building trust and respect for you ahead of time if listening is an issue, so that they are not making and enforcing rules for each other, but looking to you to do so. To do that, practice things like the working method linked below, teaching both dogs a 1-2 hour long Place, directional commands like Out (which means leave the area), Down, Leave It, and Off, so that you can tell them where they should and should not be in relation to being pushy with you or each other, helping the environment be calm and low stress for both. Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ If either doesn't listen to your commands well, you can keep a drag leash on pup when you are present (and crate when not present). Calmly lead pup where you tell them to go as needed by picking up the end of the leash. If you see any signs of aggression toward you, pause and get professional help to deal with aggression toward you also. Training will likely need to be mortified to take extra precautions to keep you safe in that case. If both dogs tend to do very well with other dogs and enjoy playing with others, I would allow supervised play after they have practiced calmness and giving each other respect first, and know each other better. When they play, if they do, interrupt it with obedience practice where they can earn treats and cool down if they start too get too rambunctious, letting them go back to playing again if they both want to once calm again, until one is getting tired. If the size issue is a safety concern, either dog doesn't do well playing, or you simply don't want them playing, it's also okay to teach them to only interact calmly with each other, they don't have to play at this age to have a good relationship. Some dogs enjoy it and do well with it, but others do not. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chloe
Chihuahua
3 Years
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Chloe
Chihuahua
3 Years

She doesn’t get along with are new dog that we got it’s a different but I just wanna know if it’ll take her along time to adjust to are new dog

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Isaiah, I would need a bit more details about the two dogs, their ages, histories with other dogs, and how they are interacting right now. Often this can be improved, but that depends on several factors. Generally, there are things that need to be done to help the process to make sure they don't begin fighting instead. You want to facilitate both dogs listening to your directions, rules, and commands - with you being the one to make and enforce rules about how the dogs interact with each other, teaching commands that help both show each other respect like Leave It and Place and crate training. You can also give your current dog a treat whenever the other dog enters the room, to help facilitate a good relationship between them, but when you do so, be sneaky so your other new dog doesn't see and come running over and start a food fight. If there is aggression present, things get worse, you feel overwhelmed, or things don't improve, I would seek the help of a trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression and comes well recommended by their previous clients. Sometimes things get better on their own as they adjust, but they can also get worse, it depends on a variety of factors, so it wouldn't hurt to have at least one consultation with a trainer to evaluate the situation. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Houston
Chihuahua
3 Years
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Houston
Chihuahua
3 Years

We have 5 dogs 2 Great Dane/English Mastiff mixes(both female), 2 male chihuahuas(fixed), and a male Dojo (fixed). One of our chihuahuas are aggressive towards one of the Great Dane females, but not the other. We cannot figure out why he seems to be so mean toward her. Could the color of the dog have anything with it. Both Daniffs are the same size. Houston is a whole 3 1/2 pounds but has no issues with the other dogs. The two little dogs still have issues with peeing on everything too. How can we stop this? All the big dogs are potty trained.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michele, For the potty training I would need a bit more details on current habits, training methods you have tried, and when/where accidents are happening? Are pups trained to go potty outside or on pee pads? The issue might be related to the use of pee pads, and pups could benefit from going back to the basics of crate training, only giving freedom when their bladders are empty, rewarding when they go potty outside. There could be a marking issue that would be addressed by having them wear belly bands, calmly building respect for you and giving more boundaries in the home overall, and tethering pups to yourself (crating when you can't do that), then interrupting pee attempts by clapping to surprise if they lift a leg and rewarding with a treat when they go outside. Other possible causes are pups needing to learn to alert when the need to go out, leftover smells from previous accidents that needs to be cleaned thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes, excited or submissive peeing, ect...more details about pups' accidents, history with potty training, what you have tried, what you are currently doing, and anything else you believe may be contributed could help determine what needs to be added or changed to see improvement. For the aggression toward your other dog, some dogs simply don't like other specific dogs. Like people, dogs can have preferences. Many dogs also respond poorly toward dogs who have neurotic or unusual behaviors, are fearful or timid, are dominating or aggressive, or simply allow them themselves to be bullied (dogs can be bullied and will bully the dog who won't tell them no regardless of size differences). Unfortunately, to address this issue more fully I would also need more details about both dogs. I suspect Houston would benefit from you calmly building respect for you and giving more "jobs" and boundaries around the home, then you being the one to decide house rules for all the dogs and implement the rules between them. Check out trainers like Thomas Davis from the Canine Educator on youtube for some examples of adding boundaries and practicing obedience to increase respect and calm co- existance between everyone. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lexa
Chihuahua
2 Months
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Question
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Lexa
Chihuahua
2 Months

She is very energetic and noisy. We cant train her to sit or down because she is always running and teasing other dogs

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jennie, I recommend starting the training while she is in a room with just you, without many distractions, before working up to practice around other dogs. Treat Luring method: Sit https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit Treat Luring method: Down https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-lay-down Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Tia
Chihuahua
6 Years
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Question
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Tia
Chihuahua
6 Years

Got her from a rescue 3 months ago. She weighs 5 pounds. When we go outside and she can see us she is fine. When we get out of her site she will cry and howl. We stayed out of her site for an hour thinking she would stop but she never did. We tried some treats that are suppose to help with separation anxiety but didn't help. We are thinking about getting another small Chihuahua for a companion. Would a male or female be better? I read where 2 females might fight. Would this help with anxiety separation if she had another dog. The rescue she was in had about 13 small dogs varies genders, age and breeds in one big room.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bonnie, Its hard to say if another dog would help. Some dogs are stressed more by a second dog, others do well and enjoy the company. As a general rule, a dog of the opposite sex is more likely to be accepted by your current dog; however, more than the sex, the type of personality that the other dog has will make the biggest difference. Often a middle of the road dog, that is not too dominate not overly timid and submissive, but a bit laid back, somewhat confident, and adaptive tends to be received most easily by many other dogs. Because you do not know whether another dog would help or not, and because the second dog could actually learn to act anxious also from your current dog, I would work on the separation anxiety from a training point first. Once it's improved, then you can consider a second dog if that's what you want. I don't recommend getting another dog for the sake of your current dog, but only if that's what you want. You current dog may or may not want another dog, but if they are in a good place themselves they are more likely able to adapt to being alone more or a second companion - whichever you prefer. I would work on building independence with pup through things like Distance Down-Stays, working up to 1 hour Place commands where pup stays while you go about your business, instead of following you around as much, a structured heel, more jobs and boundaries and structure at home in general (anxious dogs tend to benefit from work and structure), and working with a trainer who has a lot of experience dealing with separation anxiety specifically. Desensitizing pup to anything they are nervous about outside and to alone time in general through crate training and crating at points with a dog food stuffed chew toy, could also help. Check out trainers like Thomas Davis from the Canine Educator on Youtube to learn more about anxiety and the need for structure. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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