How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump and Bite

Medium
2-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Jumping is a natural behavior for dogs. Dogs will typically jump when they want your attention or if they want something you have, like a toy or a treat. If your dog thinks you have something he must have, he may jump on you and bite to get what he wants. Dogs will also jump out of excitement when meeting somebody new. Having a dog who jumps and nips at you can be scary and also dangerous. Puppies typically bite because they use their mouths to taste and feel the world around them. They do not know how much biting hurts; it is just a natural reaction for them. If you have an adult dog who is jumping and biting, it is possibly because her behavior was not corrected as she aged, leaving her with a bad habit.

Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog not to jump and bite is imperative if you plan on taking your dog anywhere or if you plan on having company at your house. A dog who has bitten someone could potentially be in trouble with the law. So, you are going to want to have a dog who is well-trained, under your control, and not jumping and biting anyone around. For a puppy, teaching him not to jump and bite could potentially require several training sessions and reminders through repetition. However, for an older dog, you are changing habits they have built up over time. Either way, you are going to require some patience. Expect to spend several minutes a day, every time your dog is tempted to jump and bite, teaching her to forget this kind of behavior.

Getting Started

Along with patience, time, and commitment to your dog's obedience training, expect to have treats, toys to offer, and the idea of the habits you would like to see your dog have such as sitting when a guest comes to visit instead of jumping and nipping at your guests. 

The On His Level Method

Most Recommended
4 Votes
Step
1
Attention
If your dog jumps and bites you when he is excited, it's because he wants attention from you. One trick is to get down on his level instead of having him jump up to yours.
Step
2
Consistent
With consistency, every time your dog jumps up and bites you, squat down to his level to give him affection and a treat to bite instead of you.
Step
3
No touching
Without touching him while you are standing, only show affection once you are at his level.
Step
4
Command
With this method, you can use a command such as 'down' if your dog knows it. If your dog needs to learn 'down', this is a good opportunity to teach him so he knows to lie down and wait for you to come to his level when he wants attention.
Step
5
Tell friends
Teach anyone around your dog if they would like to pet your dog, he needs to be calm sitting or lying down and not jumping up before they are allowed to touch him.
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The Expectations Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Tempt
To tempt your dog, hold treats in your hands and stand in front of your dog.
Step
2
Jump and nip
When he jumps up and nips at your hands, cross your arms, hiding the treats.
Step
3
Key phrase
Use a command word or a key word such as "ah ah” or a command such as 'sit'.
Step
4
Treat
When your dog sits, offer him a treat.
Step
5
Step away
Stepping away, try the process again with treats in your hands that your dog can see.
Step
6
Repeat keyword
When he jumps up and bites, use your keyword, “ah ah” and “sit.”
Step
7
Attention
When your dog diverts his attention away from your hands and sits for you, offer him a treat and verbal praise.
Step
8
Guests
Your dog will need to associate this with guests coming into your home as well as greeting you. When guests come over, use the same process holding the treats and the verbiage, so your dog associates the jumping, no matter the occasion, with the need to sit and be still followed by the reward of a treat.
Step
9
Practice
Practice several times a day for several weeks before you expect your dog to be able to sit calmly and quietly without jumping and biting.
Recommend training method?

The Teach Early Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Ouch
Letting your dog know that jumping is uncomfortable and biting hurts is a crucial part of training your dog not to jump and bite.
Step
2
Jump and bite
When your dog jumps and bites, turn your back to your dog and use the key word such as “ouch” or “ah ah.”
Step
3
No attention
Don't give your dog attention to your dog until he calms
Step
4
Follows
If your dog follows you around when you turn away from him, turn around again.
Step
5
Commands
Using a command such as “no,” “ouch,” or “ah ah,” keep your arms crossed and your back to your dog.
Step
6
Calm praise
Once your dog calms, reach down to pet him and praise him.
Step
7
Guests arrive
If your dog jumps at bites when guests arrive in your home, consider leaving a treat bowl near the door and offer your dog a treat each time he sits before opening the door and once your guest is inside.
Step
8
Repeat
You will need to repeat this process every time your dog jumps up and bites to let him know jumping is not okay.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 11/30/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Bentley
Labrador Retriever
10 Months
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Bentley
Labrador Retriever
10 Months

How do I stop my dog from jumping on me and other people?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amish, Check out the article linked below and follow the Step Toward method and Leash method. The leash method is especially useful for when pup is jumping on people other than yourself, so that you can enforce the training, and not have to have all your guests do so. Instruct guests and those living with pup not to give any attention until pup is sitting or at least calm also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Homie
Pit Bullmastiff
6 Months
0 found helpful
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Homie
Pit Bullmastiff
6 Months

When he wants to play he jumps on me he bites but not hard

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Henderson, Check out the article linked below and the Step Toward method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump For the biting, check out the Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Also, be aware when pup is getting overly aroused. Work on giving a command, freezing until pup calms down enough to obey - expect this to take a few minutes at first, then rewarding with a treat when they finally obey, and telling pup "Go Play!" and resuming the game again once they are calm and obedient. This will take some practice but it can really help pup to develop self-control and an "Off" switch. This game is a bit like red light, green light. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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A
Dane x
7 Months
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A
Dane x
7 Months

From shelters,large but still puppy. Keeps launching and grabbing arm and hand biting hard and shaking, hard to distract or get his attention when get one arm free he grabs at other one. If turn back and ignore he jumps onto my back and bites at hair. When on lead has perfect manners, off lead can't keep him calm and focused

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello MB, First, I suggest teaching the Leave It command from the "Leave It" method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also suggest working on obedience commands that require self-control like Place, Sit Stay, Down Stay, Watch Me, and Heel, in general. At home I suggest keeping a drag leash on him so that you can train in the moment. Check out something like VirChewLy chew proof leash. https://www.amazon.com/VirChewLy-Indestructible-Leash-Medium-Yellow/dp/B004HIM4XM When he understands what Leave It means then you can use that command and rewarding calmness, in combination with corrections, like the video below demonstrates. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg If you feel at all unsure how to do the training yourself I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you, or if you feel like the biting stems from true aggression instead of just over-excitement. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bagel
cattle dog/shepherd mix
10 Months
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Bagel
cattle dog/shepherd mix
10 Months

I have already been turning my back and ignoring when she jumps and bites, but she just grabs my legs and jumps and bites the back of my leg. How do I deal with that?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, Check out the article linked below and try the 'Step Toward" method. When you do this be firm. You are using your body language to convey that you want her to respect your space. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump If the jumping continues after two weeks of practicing the Step Toward method, or you are seeing zero improvement after one week (improvement may be gradual but you should see some pretty quickly), then check out the video below and work on building respect in general and adding in more structure. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cami
Toy poo
10 Years
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Cami
Toy poo
10 Years

Cami is been with me for 3mths now. When I go to pick up my other dog (who I had first) , Cami runs from wherever she is and jumps up and tries to bite my arm. I know it’s jealousy but don’t know what to do about it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elxyis, First, this is a behavior that I suggest you hire a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues to help you with in person. I suggest starting by increasing the dogs' respect for you. Check out the following videos and articles for a overall doggie bootcamp, working on commands and daily boundaries to address pup's respect for you and overall attitude. Also, don't tolerate pushiness or guarding you. If pup nudges your hand, climbs into your lap uninvited or gets between you and the other dog, make pup leave the room. I suggest keeping a drag leash on him while you are home to supervise, so that you can quickly enforce commands with less drama. I also suggest getting pup used to wearing a basket muzzle as a standard thing during the day when you are home while you are dealing with this issue, and crating pup when you are not home or need a break. This dog needs a lot of structure and boundaries in life right now. Don't feel bad about being a bit of a drill sergeant with him for a while - It won't hurt him, it's a lot better than pup being re-homed, and biting you is unacceptable. Working and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Out command - this command should be done with the help of a professional trainer to avoid being bitten: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Finally, you may need to set up scenarios where he tries to rush you around your other dog - while wearing the basket muzzle for your safety, and correct the behavior in real time also. If you work on his overall respect for you doing the above training I mentioned the behavior may stop on its own without having to address it directly. If that doesn't happen, a correction needs to take place as soon as he moves toward you to bite. To get the timing right without being close to pup you may need an e-collar or a second person to correct pup. For this part of the training I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with aggression to help set up the appropriate scenario and decide on the best way to do this based on you and your dog. This can be done with or without rewards. A correction for starting to push - with intent to bite when he got to you, needs to happen first, but after a few repetitions of the situation, once pup stops rushing, if he ignored you being near your other dog and stayed calm, you could reward him for that correct response also. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Russell
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
0 found helpful
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Russell
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

Lately when we get ready for a walk he lunges at me He wants to bite if I try to ignore him he goes for my legs and shoes if I stand still he goes for my arms he’s 55 lbs hard to ignore

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, Check out the video linked below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I am having very similar issues with a 5 month old lab retriever. Has anything been successful for you and Russel?

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Malakai
Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Malakai
Husky
1 Year

How do I get him to stop jumping and biting? Especially when it’s bed time or he doesn’t get attention, he attacks me

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This will be a 2 part answer and will be a little long. But you will get all of the information you need for a more peaceful environment. Dogs may nip/bite/mouth for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or a form of aggression. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Now onto jumping. When good behavior is consistently rewarded and jumping is ignored, dogs can quickly learn that keeping four feet on the ground is a preferable posture. No Rewards Allowed Training books and videos offer a number of creative methods for teaching a jumping dog to stop. Why, then, do so many dog owners continue to be subjected to this often unwelcome advance. The most important reason lies in the way that dogs learn. Any behavior that results in a reward is likely to be repeated. Rewards may be obvious or may be quite subtle. When dogs are excited, they naturally jump up onto their “target.” Over the course of time they are met with hands petting them or pushing them away – with voices sometimes warm, at other times stern or surprised. All of these responses can be rewarding – and, therefore, all of them may reinforce jumping up behavior. When such rewards are scarce and intermittent – they are even more powerful reinforcers. So even if the family is working hard to ignore jumping up, the occasional reward supplied by a long-lost, third cousin can undo all the good work. Take Action What can be done to plant those four feet firmly on the ground? First, inform all family members and visitors that, from this day forward, jumping of any kind is banned. Peoples’ only reaction to jumping should be no reaction. Everyone should remain utterly silent, averting their gaze and adopting an indifferent posture. Enlist the help of a neighbor or friend who can knock and enter repeatedly. Leash your dog and arm yourself with small food treats (perhaps placing a jar of treats near the door for visitors to dispense) Tell your dog to sit before he jumps up, while he’s still calm enough to comply. Reward non-jumping behavior with food treats. Persistent attempts to jump can be corrected by saying, “OFF,” walking your dog briskly in a circle, then telling him to sit (followed by a reward). Repeat the exercise as needed. Unlike pushing, petting or begging your dog to “get down,” this exercise is unambiguous and rewards an alternative behavior – sitting. Your chances of success will be far greater if you work with others who can “provoke” your dog by entering the house or passing you on the street, time and time again. You should set up the training. At each pass, tell your dog to sit and reward this preferred behavior. In time, shift the control from yourself to the “visitor,” who supplies attention only when your dog sits. Before you know it your dog will earn your heartfelt praise by sitting calmly instead of jumping up. A properly fitted head halter, such as the Gentle Leader, can be an invaluable tool for facilitating this type of retraining. All that is required is to pull forward and up to position the dog in a “sit” position. Then immediately release tension on the lead and praise the dog lavishly for sitting. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Roger
Golden Retriever
13 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Roger
Golden Retriever
13 Weeks

Roger bites me, mostly arms and clothing. Won’t let go unless I can get to a treat. By then, I’m bleeding, or my sleeves are ripped. I take blood thinners, but the bites are deep and bleed a lot. I now wear long sleeves to hide the bites and bruises. I’ve tried: Kong’s (filled/unfiltered/frozen), frozen, damp washcloths rolled, teething toys, bully sticks, carrots. He walks well on leash, but is stubborn about when we go or not. I play games with him, ball, hide a treat under a couple cups. Then he bites and jumps. So into his crate. Help. I’m desperate. Everyone says to take him to a trainer but it not affordable for me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lucy, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal - especially for a retriever. It's not fun and pup is biting way too hard but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but they can also be a great way to create your own puppy class with pup. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ If you decide to host a puppy class or want to practice more on your own, here are some additional resources: check out these videos of a puppy class. Follow along with your puppy at home and practice the exercises to help with general basic obedience: Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Morticia
French Bulldog
8 Months
0 found helpful
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Morticia
French Bulldog
8 Months

My dog lunges and nips at us for attention, she will stop when we play with her but when we stop she continues. We want to play with her, but she will do this for hours at a time. She knows "sit" "down" and a few other tricks but chooses to completely ignore these commands unless theres food involved.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Louise, Check out the video linked below. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg I also suggest practicing additional commands that work on impulse control, calmness, and building respect. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ruby
English Bulldog
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Ruby
English Bulldog
10 Weeks

My dog gets so excited she jumps and nips at peoples feet and faces and can break skin. Kids are becoming afraid of her. How can I correct this behavior? We put her in time out when she does this so she won’t get attention from us.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jordann, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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beethoven
spanial
4 Years
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beethoven
spanial
4 Years

He is in a rescue compound and we are dog walkers.
we can only walk him once a week so I understand the difficulty of not beingh able to be there everyday.He is obviously very exited when we arrive and will jump up and nip until he has calmed down after 5min or so. he is ok while we put a lead on but then
back to jump & nip.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about Beethoven. Lovely of you to be dog walkers and helping out dogs in need! It's understandable that this energetic Spaniel is acting the way he does because he is unable to get the exercise that he needs. My suggestion would be to bring a toy along with you, perhaps a tug toy or a Nyla bone-type toy that he can put in his mouth as a distraction to not nip and jump. Give it a try and see if that serves the purpose of distraction. Be sure to praise Beethoven for his good behavior and walk him as long as you can to tire him out. I hope he gets rescued soon!

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Broly
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year
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Broly
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year

I have had Broly for about two weeks now, adopted him from a shelter with no bite history very sweet dog, recently he has been jumping and biting at random times and we tell him no or to stop but he just keeps on going and my family is now scared of him because of that. I need help to find a way for him to stop thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Oscar, Does the biting seem to be pup trying to play roughly and get attention, or aggressive in nature? If pup is jumping and biting to gain attention as a way to play, check out the articles and video linked below. Jumping - step toward method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump#method-1 Mouthing biting - leave it method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Rude jumping and mouthing, play behavior: https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg If pup's biting is due to aggression, him trying to dominate or harm, or something else that's also more serious, it's time to hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression to help in person. Pup will likely need to be desensitized to wearing a basket muzzle if aggression is an issue. Use pups daily meal kibble to reward pup for touching the muzzle, eating treats from inside it, and eating multiple treats, fed through the basket muzzle's holes as pup holds their face in it for longer, then given multiple treats as you buckle and unbuckle the muzzle. Practice all of this until pup doesn't mind wearing the muzzle because they associate it with food. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Casper
Pit bull mix
9 Months
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Casper
Pit bull mix
9 Months

My mom and I (16) adopted Casper about four weeks ago from our local shelter. They told us that he had some past biting issues but we did not know to what extent... thought it was just issues being too rambunctious around children in past household. However, we have learned that he bites a lot and very hard. He has broken my moms’s skin on multiple occasions. We have concluded that he bites for attention or for play. If he gets too excited during play or we stop, he bites. If we’re sitting on the couch watching tv and he feels he is not getting enough attention, he bites. Even when we invite him to sit with us, he sometimes still bites. He rarely listens when we say no. He grabs arms and holds on. If arms are not an option he goes for your ankles, feet, legs, or honestly whatever he can reach. He ripped my jeans the first day we got him. We have tried the redirection of toys when biting occurs, which he usually stops biting us, but he then just thinks we gave into his ask for play. We also tried the yelping/ouch method, but he just took that as us playing back, and seemed to go even harder. Most recently we tried the vinegar water spray mixture, which he ironically enjoys, and proceeds to lick the bottle to get extra drops off. He knows basic commands; sit, stay, lay down, shake, and we have worked on leave it some. However, when he is in attack mode he does not obey any commands, and more often than not we have to physically make him sit and hold him until he calms down. No matter what method we use, we always say no bite in the hopes he will learn. He really is a great loving dog, so I highly doubt this is an aggression/ dominance issue. He sleeps with me at night, gives lots of kisses, and always wants to be close to us. It is hard to see a dog with so much potential have such a roadblock. I’m hoping you will be able to help us!! We have had many other dogs and never had an issue like this, I’m sure any advice will help. Also, I see in other feedback recommendations of hiring a professional. This is something I have considered, but I am not sure how that would work considering the current COVID19 situation. Thank you so much for any advice you have to give, I love him so much and we desperately want to help him past this, because he is such an amazing boy!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hayden, I would recommend hiring a professional in this case. Because of Covid I would actually recommend looking for someone who specializes in behavior issues and offers Skype training sessions. The trainer won't be there to help in person, but they would still be able to demonstrate how to do things over video, answer questions, ask more about pup's behavior to ensure the methods they recommend are a good fit, tailor the training along the way depending on what's working and not working, and give guidance overall. Check out Sean O'Shea from the Good Dog at the link below. He has several free videos and resources online, specializes in behavior issues like biting, and also offers Skype training sessions. He may not be an option, but a trainer with that type of experience is what I would recommend. You also need someone who can safely guide how to go about working with pup while keeping you safe - since pup is likely to protest anything he doesn't want to do with more biting. For that reason I recommend getting pup used to wearing a basket muzzle. The basket muzzle will allow pup to open his mouth still while wearing it and be more comfortable than a standard muzzle, but will allow you to practice the things that usually trigger the biting without pup being able to use his mouth to protest it and bite you. Pup needs his ability to use his mouth to protest taken away during training - in the past, biting probably got him what he wanted - which was to not have to do something he didn't like or to get attention. He needs to find out that biting is no longer successful for him as part of the process to break the habit. Once that happens, then pup can be rewarded for more appropriate behavior by passing treats through the muzzle's holes to him when he is obedient and responsive. The desensitization process should happen in a way that makes the muzzle a bit boring, and not something scary. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Sean O' Shea from the Good Dog: https://www.thegooddog.net/ Example of him working with a dog with a similar issue to what it sounds like your pup may have going on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maple
Labradoodle
7 Months
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Maple
Labradoodle
7 Months

My dog Maple (she is a labradoodle) has these moments outside and sometimes inside where she will start barking, jumping and nipping at me out of the blue. This has been going on for about 4 months and we have tried almost everything. From ignoring to rewarding good behavior and much more. nothing has worked. What should we do.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Maple is a cutie! She is a combination of two very energetic breeds and that translates to a lot of walking and exercise. Every day - runs when possible, too. She is super smart as well so will need mental stimulation to keep her content. She could be acting up because she needs structure and direction. She will excel at obedience classes and if you are the one to take her, she will learn to respect and listen to you. Right now, it seems as though she does not. The behavior could be out of frustration too. I suggest looking for dog training right away. Also, buy interactive toys that present a mental challenge. She would do well in agility but will need to know her basic commands for that. Take a look at the Obedience Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-be-calm. Keep Maple well exercised and tired. Good luck training!

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Garlicc
Jack russell mix Australia cattle dog
4 Months
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Garlicc
Jack russell mix Australia cattle dog
4 Months

Garlicc will always jump and bite when he wants attention. Had used the method of turning away and ignore him but he will continue to jump and bite. Been like this since I have him for 2 months. Please advice. thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cecilia, Check out the article linked below and use the Step toward method with you, and the leash pressure method with guests. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Also, check out the article linked below and use the Leave It method for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Finally, teach the Out command, which means leave the area, and have pup leave the area completely whenever they are overly excited and can't respond to other commands. Check out the section on using out to deal with pushy behavior once you have followed the section on how to teach out. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eli
Golden Retriever
5 Months
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Eli
Golden Retriever
5 Months

I am my dogs main caregiver. I train him, feed him, exercise him and am home with him all day. When he is overstimulated, he will nip at my thighs or he will jump up and bite my arms but never my spouse. He has done this twice in a public place (dog park) where I have no toy to replace my hands. Is there a reason he only does this with me and not my spouse? How do I correct him?
Overstimulation is caused by playing in water

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am a firm believer in obedience training classes. You are the prime caregiver and Eli should respect you but he does not. Taking him to obedience classes will further cement your bond but also teach him to follow your leadership. Until you get to classes, take a look here. To get Eli to not bite: The Verbal Cue Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-your-hands. To listen to you: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. Heeling is a way to develop respect: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Eli is of working lineage and obedience classes will give his keen mind a good workout and make him well-behaved. Good luck!

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Dekker
Australian Shepherd Dog
1 Year
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Dekker
Australian Shepherd Dog
1 Year

Hello, This dog showed up under our deck half starved and very scared/shy. After more than a week, we got him to come out and eventually interact with us. He’s had no socializing but is learning to trust us and is becoming very playful and thus hard to handle. He jumps and nips and doesn’t know any commands and just wants to play, won’t listen. We’d like to know how to start working with him. He seems smart and will make a great addition to our acreage. We also have a small spaniel that he would really like to play with, but he runs and jumps at her so she’s afraid of him. We can’t get him to settle down when he sees her because he’d really like to play with her. He’s not at all aggressive, just no manners or social skills. What’s our best options.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anna, Start by teaching pup commands so that you can better communicate with them. Step Toward method for jumping: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Leave It for biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - leave the area - to give the older dog or people space when needed: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place - have pup work up to a 1 hour Place with a dog food stuffed chew toy to work on, for times when pup needs to be calmer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Heel - Turns method - have pup work on obedience during walks to wear them out not only physically but also mentally, to help with calmness: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Australian Shepherds are an intelligent breed who often need mental and physical stimulation - especially mental. Regularly practicing commands or tricks that challenge pup a bit mentally, incorporating training into exercise, like heeling during walks, Sit and Down during Fetch, games like Round Robin or Hide and Seek for Come, and feeding part of meals in durable hollow chew toys like Kongs, puzzle toys, Kong wobbles, and other things that keep pup occupied, can help pup feel more fulfilled. You can teach most dogs an "Off" switch however. That involves working on things like Place and Heel, that require pup to learn self-control, and gradually building up the difficulty of training by progressively practicing around harder and harder distractions, to help them grow. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocky
Chow, Lab,Husky
9 Months
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Rocky
Chow, Lab,Husky
9 Months

My dog is a very sweet dog, but I am struggling very much to train him. He does not listen to my commands when I have tried teaching him to not jump or stay unless their is food or treats. As soon as they both run out, he stops listening to me. He is at a phase where he is jumping and nipping the moment I am around him. He does not leave me alone to even walk without doing this. When I attempt to play with him, he gets overly excited and starts to nip and jump. I am stuck at how to train my dog and sometimes feel afraid that he will bite me.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This will be a 2 part answer and will be a little long. But you will get all of the information you need for a more peaceful environment. Dogs may nip/bite/mouth for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or a form of aggression. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Now onto jumping. When good behavior is consistently rewarded and jumping is ignored, dogs can quickly learn that keeping four feet on the ground is a preferable posture. No Rewards Allowed Training books and videos offer a number of creative methods for teaching a jumping dog to stop. Why, then, do so many dog owners continue to be subjected to this often unwelcome advance. The most important reason lies in the way that dogs learn. Any behavior that results in a reward is likely to be repeated. Rewards may be obvious or may be quite subtle. When dogs are excited, they naturally jump up onto their “target.” Over the course of time they are met with hands petting them or pushing them away – with voices sometimes warm, at other times stern or surprised. All of these responses can be rewarding – and, therefore, all of them may reinforce jumping up behavior. When such rewards are scarce and intermittent – they are even more powerful reinforcers. So even if the family is working hard to ignore jumping up, the occasional reward supplied by a long-lost, third cousin can undo all the good work. Take Action What can be done to plant those four feet firmly on the ground? First, inform all family members and visitors that, from this day forward, jumping of any kind is banned. Peoples’ only reaction to jumping should be no reaction. Everyone should remain utterly silent, averting their gaze and adopting an indifferent posture. Enlist the help of a neighbor or friend who can knock and enter repeatedly. Leash your dog and arm yourself with small food treats (perhaps placing a jar of treats near the door for visitors to dispense) Tell your dog to sit before he jumps up, while he’s still calm enough to comply. Reward non-jumping behavior with food treats. Persistent attempts to jump can be corrected by saying, “OFF,” walking your dog briskly in a circle, then telling him to sit (followed by a reward). Repeat the exercise as needed. Unlike pushing, petting or begging your dog to “get down,” this exercise is unambiguous and rewards an alternative behavior – sitting. Your chances of success will be far greater if you work with others who can “provoke” your dog by entering the house or passing you on the street, time and time again. You should set up the training. At each pass, tell your dog to sit and reward this preferred behavior. In time, shift the control from yourself to the “visitor,” who supplies attention only when your dog sits. Before you know it your dog will earn your heartfelt praise by sitting calmly instead of jumping up. A properly fitted head halter, such as the Gentle Leader, can be an invaluable tool for facilitating this type of retraining. All that is required is to pull forward and up to position the dog in a “sit” position. Then immediately release tension on the lead and praise the dog lavishly for sitting. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Gus
Border Terrier
1 Year
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Gus
Border Terrier
1 Year

When my dog gets excited, he jumps excessively and will not get down until I push him off of me. If I try to turn around, he jumps on my back and if I get down to his level, he puts his paw up on my shoulders. What should I do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Since you have already tried the ignoring technique with no success, I have an alternative method for you. Show the jumper no attention when you walk in or whenever he's jumping. Don't say "No" or "Down." Even these kind of words are giving the jumper attention, which to him is a signal to keep jumping up. Pull your arms close to your chest while he's jumping on you. Don't push him down or use your hands in any fashion, as this is signaling some sort of attention. Turn and walk away, such as back out the door you came in, if he's jumping on you when you enter. As you're walking, be sure not to give him any attention. Simply pull your arms up, turn around and walk away. This may be slightly annoying at first, as a jumper that's not accustomed to this may at first not get the hint you're trying to drop. Give a firm "sit" command during the jumping process. Training your pup to sit instead of jump can ease your dog's confusion regarding what he's really supposed to be doing. Give the dog attention only when all four of his paws are on the ground where they're supposed to be. When Meeting Other People Follow these procedures when you're walking your dog. If a person comes by that your dog wants to greet, make him sit. Let the other person know what's going on in the training process. Handing the other person a treat and having them give the "sit" command will help tremendously; your dog will come to understand that sitting for a nice stranger or guest equals yummy treats.

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Reyna
Mix
7 Months
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Reyna
Mix
7 Months

Reyna gets very excited pretty easily. She has a tendency to jump on you and nip at your hands at any opportunity. She’s getting older so the bites are starting to hurt more. I know she is still fairly young but I’m worried this will become a habit. It’s hard to get her to stop because when you say “off” or push her off she thinks we’re playing. After a back and forth of “no” or “off” she gets frustrated and starts whining and barking. I don’t know what to do and I’m worried she may seriously hurt me or someone I know.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While this is fairly common for dogs her age, you are right in the sense that she is getting older and it sounds like this is becoming a habit, it is no longer a playful puppy phase. I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Sal
Mutt
6 Months
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Sal
Mutt
6 Months

My dog keeps biting us hard, and when we say no or try to take him out to calm him down, he will show signs of aggression, biting harder, jumping us and growling

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While this is fairly common for dogs his age, he is getting older and it sounds like this is becoming a habit, it is no longer a playful puppy phase. I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. And it sounds like he is acting out because he isn't getting that attention. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Willie
French Bulldog
13 Weeks
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Question
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Willie
French Bulldog
13 Weeks

Twice a day he will jump up and bite legs sometimes breaks skin

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Athena
pitbull
2 Years
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Athena
pitbull
2 Years

My dog keeps jumping and nipping at people she even tried to jump and nip at the neighbors kids how can I stop this?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While this is fairly common for younger dogs, he is a bit older and it sounds like this has become a habit. I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The tips below are geared towards puppies, but the process is exactly the same. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Ari
Pit bull
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Ari
Pit bull
5 Months

jumping and biting when excited

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Maverick
Siberian Husky
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Maverick
Siberian Husky
3 Years

We just adopted this dog and he lacks critical training. He only sits for food but not on command. He doesn't know the lay down command, or stay or any other basic commands. He likes to jump and nip at various body parts. He likes to grab our sons toys and chew them up as well as shoes and basically anything he can get his paws on. Any advise on training is welcomed.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you information on the jumping and biting. Both behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors often seen in puppies. But if left uncorrected, they become habits as dogs become adults. The information is geared towards puppies, but the process is exactly the same. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Bekky
Malinois Greyhound
8 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Bekky
Malinois Greyhound
8 Months

Hello .... I just got a new dog and i tried to introduce her to my dog ... But everytime they get close to each other she tries to bite him ... She's showing some agressive behavior towards him ...What should I do !?!? My old dog "Fury" 10 months old malinois and my new dog "Bekky" is also a malinois

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you will have to work on getting the two dogs used to each other on neutral ground maybe by walking them together often, keeping them separated and gradually letting them walk closer together as the weeks go on. Take a look here for tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. Make sure that Fury knows he is still important and give him extra attention. Do not let Bekky bother Fury - keep them separate in the house if you have to until they are friendlier with each other. Work on training commands with both of them every day so there is structure in the home for them to follow:https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-whippet. If after exercising them a lot together on neutral territory and using tips from the Accept a New Dog guide, they still don't get along, you may have to get a trainer in to help you. The bigger they get, the more of a problem you will have. All the best!

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Zak
Cavachon
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Zak
Cavachon
10 Months

Constantly trying to jump up biting and pulling my clothes

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like he hasn't quite learned that boundary. Because that is an attention seeking behavior, the quickest and easiest way to stop that behavior is to completely get up and leave when it happens. Or walk out of the room so he can't reach you. No reaction. No eye contact. Just fold your arms and go. He will quickly learn to stop doing that because it is causing the opposite of what he is wanting.

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Aarya
Beagle
8 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Aarya
Beagle
8 Months

We play with him for about half an hr every day and we also can't do it more than that. The problem is when we are playing with him and suddenly we stop the activity (because someone might want to have a small convo with me) he jumps and bites me. Sometimes it's really scary.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like he hasn't quite learned that boundary. Because that is an attention seeking behavior, the quickest and easiest way to stop that behavior is to completely get up and leave when it happens. Or walk out of the room so he can't reach you. No reaction. No eye contact. Just fold your arms and go. He will quickly learn to stop doing that because it is causing the opposite of what he is wanting.

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Archie
Portuguese Water Dog
5 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Archie
Portuguese Water Dog
5 Months

My dog leaps up and bites me. I’ve tried turning away and not reacting, but he merely bites my back instead. I’ve tried using a toy, or throwing treats in front of him, he’s not interested, he only wants to bite my arms. He is great with other people and dogs, very deferential. His behavior towards me comes out of the blue, usually outdoors, he might be in the leash or off the leash. If I yell ‘sit’ at him that sometimes works but only for ten seconds or so or until he’s eaten the treat. Then he starts leaping and tearing at my clothing again.
He doesn’t do it when anyone else is present, and, as I say, he is quite gentle with other people and dogs. I’m am at my wits end. It’s hard to love a dog who attacks you every day and if we don’t get this behavior under control within the week I am going to have to give him back.
I’ve had dogs from this breed before, and never had a problem.
Anything you can suggest will be gratefully tried.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. It sounds like you have tried the techniques that most of us recommend and nothing is working. It seems like he views you as a play mate. He is young enough for this behavior to turn around quickly, but it might take a little bit longer than a week. If you have the desire to go a little longer, then you can try implementing some boundaries in a passive way. We often scold in the moment and that doesn't work very well on dogs who are head strong. It tends to make them continue with the unwanted behaviors. When behaviors like this arise, I typically have my customers use a "nothing is for free" approach. It's simple yet super effective in helping the humans in the pack regain their leadership position, without any harsh techniques or punishments. You do simple things like make him sit before feeding, sit and stay while you exit doorways first, sit before putting on the leash, sit and be calm before giving any attention. All these things he loves. But now he has to work for them. They are no longer given freely. Also, in a pinch until he calms down a bit, if he starts jumping on you while he is leashed, you can step on the leash to leave him with no space to jump on you. I really hope some of this helps you. He sounds pretty great otherwise. Please feel free to message again if you need more help.

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Oliver
Boxer
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Oliver
Boxer
3 Months

jumping at me and biting and barking

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Milo
Labernand
1 Month
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Milo
Labernand
1 Month

What injections does he need right now?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi, depending on where you live, he needs a 4 or 5 way vaccination which includes canine parvo virus and bordatella. It is a good idea to contact your veterinarian or a local clinic or pet store that provides vaccinations.

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Dinky
Labrador Retriever
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dinky
Labrador Retriever
7 Months

Really excitable when someone comes to visit and when his out on lead I dread someone coming towards me as I know his going to jump on them,I find when his on his own with me in a field his usually very good I have him thought to sit like down roll over but most of the time gets too excited in the presence of others any solutions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Richard, For the pulling, check out the article linked below and the Turns method. Practice it with pup's muzzle slightly behind your leg and as soon as pup starts to move their head past your leg, turn directly in front of pup. Timing is important here - if you wait until pup is further ahead this will be hard to do. Practice in an open area like your yard, calm cul-de-sac free or cars, park, or field at first. If pup is pulling you forward, you may need to use a training collar at first, until pup responds to the training with practice. A gentle leader or prong collar tend to work best for strong dogs. Look up how to properly fit both though, since they are often worn wrong and ineffective and less safe when put on incorrectly. Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel For the jumping, work on teaching pup a sit. Practice with family and friends coming to your home first. Each time have them sit. Open the door a bit and command Sit. If they obey, open the door all the way and let the guest in. If they disobey and try to rush the door, close it more so they can't get through and wait until they sit before opening it again. Once the guest is inside, practice the Step Toward method with those who live with pup and won't be thrown off balance (step toward pup as soon as paws start to leave the floor. Don't wait until pup has jumped onto you). And the Leash method with guests. Once pup is consistent at home, recruit friends and family to practice approaching you on a walk you have set up - so pup thinks its someone unexpected coming up to you. When pup chooses to sit (having practiced that at home), have the person feed pup a treat below their chin (don't hold the treat above pup or they will jump to get it). If pup jumps, use the Leash method or Step Toward method. With pup being so excitable this will take a lot of intentional repetition so that it becomes habit to sit to get attention, rather than jump. Sit helps in addition to other training, because pup can't jump and sit at the same time, and needs another way to ask for attention besides jumping. Step Toward and Leash method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23zEy-e6Khg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Molly
Golden Retriever
14 Months
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Molly
Golden Retriever
14 Months

when walking Molly, after a bit she starts jumping and growling at me and chews her harness. She can get quite vicious with me.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. It seems like she views you as a play mate. She is young enough for this behavior to turn around quickly, but it might take a few weeks of consistent work to see progress. If you have the desire to go a little longer, then you can try implementing some boundaries in a passive way. We often scold in the moment and that doesn't work very well on dogs who are head strong. It tends to make them continue with the unwanted behaviors. When behaviors like this arise, I typically have my customers use a "nothing is for free" approach. It's simple yet super effective in helping the humans in the pack regain their leadership position, without any harsh techniques or punishments. You do simple things like make her sit before feeding, sit and stay while you exit doorways first, sit before putting on the leash, sit and be calm before giving any attention. All these things she loves. But now she has to work for them. They are no longer given freely. Also, in a pinch until she calms down a bit, if she starts jumping on you while she is leashed, you can step on the leash to leave her with no space to jump on you. I really hope some of this helps you. Please feel free to message again if you need more help.

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Rex
Rottweiler
12 Months
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Rex
Rottweiler
12 Months

Everytime i go outside he jumps and bites me the whole time im outside i have to be hard on him to stop it's getting tiresome he to aggressive

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Kylo
German shepherd husky catahoulla
9 Months
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Kylo
German shepherd husky catahoulla
9 Months

How can I keep my dog from jumping and biting my younger kids

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, Is Kyro jumping up and trying to playfully nip them and being too rough? Or acting aggressive toward your kids, like they intend to harm them? If pup is being aggressive toward your kids and not just excitable, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression to help you with this in person. I also recommend desensitizing pup to wearing a basket muzzle for your kids' safety and to help pup learn that they can't use their mouth to get what they want. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s If pup is simply overly excitable and trying to be playful, I recommend teaching several commands and enforcing the commands on behalf of your kids with pup. Leave It method - once pup is doing well with this, if pup is excitable but not aggressive, with pup on leash for kids' safety, help the kids also practice this command with pup with you present, so pup will learn to respond to them saying Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area. Once pup knows Out well, you can use Out to deal with pushy behavior, and be the one to enforce the command on behalf of your kids, moving pup out of the area, away from your kids when they don't respond to just the verbal command. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Jumping - Leash method and Sit method with you holding the leash to prevent pup from jumping on kids during practice, practicing pup sitting when kid's command and kids tossing treats at pup's paws when pup is gentle with greetings. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Astro
Weimaraner
7 Months
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Astro
Weimaraner
7 Months

He gets aggressive very quickly when playing. He also bites on corners of walls and scratches up the backyard door. When he has something that he shouldn’t have he’ll put it in his mouth and if we try to take it he’ll growl and bite our hands.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laila, Because of the resource guarding and biting specifically I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to help you in person with his training. Look for someone who has experience with resource guarding and aggression and comes well recommended by their previous clients. With the help of a trainer I would work on building pup's overall respect and trust for you. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you I would work on teaching pup Drop It using treats or toy trades - Drop It: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-to-fetch/ I would work on deterring the chewing through commands like Leave It, Out, deterrent sprays, and confinement when you can't supervise pup: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Finally, I would work on things that build impulse control like Place, Heel, Stay, and Wait. There are likely other things that need to be addressed to help with the aggression and need for better impulse control. A trainer with the experience in the areas needed who can evaluate pup's body language and evaluate what safety measures need to be in place while training and giving more boundaries (which pup may protest at first), and show how to calmly and confidently lead pup can help with tailoring the training to pup and you best. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Marlow
Labrador Retriever
9 Months
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Marlow
Labrador Retriever
9 Months

He has started to jump and bite us when we take him for a walk - we know it's when he's excited but the bites are getting harder and it doesn't stop when we turn around and cross our arms. He is also now doing this to our 12 year old children. He is also a terrible thief! Food/clothes/shoes/ jumping up on surfaces etc.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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HARLY
BELGE MALINOIS
1 Month
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HARLY
BELGE MALINOIS
1 Month

my dog dont like treats he likes toy more how can i get him to accept treats

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. At this age, puppies aren't interested in a variety of foods. The best thing you can do is to keep introducing him to the treats, and he will likely become more interested in them. Also, until then, if you are wanting to use treats for training, you can just use his food in place of treats.

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Sena
Bernese Mountain Dog
6 Months
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Sena
Bernese Mountain Dog
6 Months

Hello! My 6 month old dog is not puppy sized anymore, but she jumps on us snd bites us to the point it hurts. She also gets mud all over us, seeing as she is an outdoor dog. We also have her mother, who is so much calmer then her, and sometimes punishes her when she is too energetic, but it doesn’t seem to do much. We don’t know what to do. She already destroyed everything in our yard. What should we do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While this is fairly common for dogs her age, you are right in the sense that she is getting older and it sounds like this is becoming a habit, it is no longer a playful puppy phase. I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Alfie
Beagle Harrier
10 Months
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Alfie
Beagle Harrier
10 Months

He jumps up on a walk and bites his lead then bites my hands and arms.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jane, Check out the jumping article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Check out the Leave It method for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also have pup obey obedience commands throughout the walk to keep their energy calmer, so they become less aroused while walking, and help gently increase respect. Commands like Heeling behind the leg, Sit, Down, Stay, and Watch Me. For the leash biting, you can try spraying the leash with bitter apple, but also work up to pup being able to obey leave it and keeping their focus on working during the walk. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bandit
australian shepherd mix
23 Weeks
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Bandit
australian shepherd mix
23 Weeks

He's very stubborn and continues to jump and bite when trying to get him to stop. If you turn your back he will bite your back. He's just really high energy and stubborn. He's very smart and I love him dearly but am needing advice on this bad habit. Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, Check out the two articles linked below. If pup is biting to try to get your attention, opposed to true aggression, then I would work on teaching pup Leave It to build their self-control and understanding of what you want, as well as use the Step Towards method to move into pup as soon as they are about to jump, or the Leash method when you have a leash on pup or when guests visit, and finally the Out command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Step Toward and Leash methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Depending on how hard pup is biting, you may need to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle in general - so pup doesn't mind it and so that it's not only associated with situations pup jumps in. After pup is desensitized, then set up scenarios where pup commonly jumps and bites and practice your commands like Leave It and stepping toward. When pup doesn't jump when you do things that normally cause them to, like jump up and down, turn away from them, hold a toy, first get home, ect...then reward pup with a treat hidden in your pocket through the muzzle's holes. A basket muzzle should allow you to do this, opposed to a standard muzzle. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I don't see your reply to my question. I can see the others but not mine.

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Teddy Bear
Rottweiler x gsh
18 Months
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Teddy Bear
Rottweiler x gsh
18 Months

Teddy jumps up and trys to bite upper arms and wellies when on a walk sometimes - mainly when he first steps onto grass

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, For this behavior at this age, I do recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to help you in person with this. Look for someone who comes well recommended by their previous clients. It sounds like pup may be becoming overly aroused, then doing the behavior as a way to release that pent up energy - sort of like pup wanting to wrestle with another dog; however, the issue could also be related to aggression and that arousal during towards a form of aggression, which is more serious and needs to be addressed more carefully, likely including the use of a basket muzzle right now as well. If the behavior is pup being excited and not aggressive in nature, I would work on the following with a trainer's help, but again I don't recommend working on it on your own without having a trainer evaluate and oversee things. Check out the jumping article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Check out the Leave It method for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also have pup obey obedience commands throughout the walk to keep their energy calmer, so they become less aroused while walking, and help gently increase respect. Commands like Heeling behind the leg, Sit, Down, Stay, and Watch Me. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Miya
German Shepherd
3 Months
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Miya
German Shepherd
3 Months

She is very very excited always and keeps nibbling or catching our feet or runs around all the time in the house. I have tried teaching her sit, down and stay but she listens to these commands only when she knows she will get a treat. She keeps jumping at us and in return our clothes get torn

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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chloe
Giant Schnauzer
13 Weeks
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chloe
Giant Schnauzer
13 Weeks

cant seem to break the biting, nipping and jumping.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello, For the biting, check out the Leave It method from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the jumping, check out this article, especially the Step Toward or Leash method for an exuberant pup. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump I suggest practicing something called "Jazz up and Settle Down". Which is a bit like red light, green light for dogs. During training, get him a little excited, then command "Stop" or something he knows like "Sit", and freeze. Wait and completely ignore him until he calms back down. As soon as he gets calm or sits, praise and give a treat. Tell him "Let's Play!" again, and start playing and getting him a bit excited again. As soon as he starts to get a little worked up (not too much at first), command "Stop" or "Sit" again, then wait, reward with a treat when he calms down, then continue the game after he is rewarded. Repeat this a few times each training session, then end the session (have lots of frequent shorter sessions throughout the day at his age). As he improves, and can really calm down quickly, let him get a bit more excited before calling Stop. Gradually work up to him becoming more and more excited and having to calm down quickly from a higher level of excitement as he improves. Also, understand that this will take some time and practice. Puppies have to learn self-control just like any other skill, while young. This game can help him develop it sooner though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bruno
English Springer Spaniel
10 Weeks
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Bruno
English Springer Spaniel
10 Weeks

Bruno is my 18 year old daughters puppy. Unfortunately it's her that he seems to become very very giddy around. She can just be walking and he will jump and bite at her feet, nip at her hands and face and when she tells him NO, he simply carries on. She has tried removing herself from the situation, ignoring his behaviour but he continues to do this with her and I'm concerned it is starting to upset her and will eventually effect how she feels about him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karen, First, if you can find a puppy kindergarten or puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite The Out command can also be helpful to teach pup to give space. After pup knows this command, you can follow the section in the article below on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behavior. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bella
Labradoodle
7 Months
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Bella
Labradoodle
7 Months

My seven month old dog jump up and pull the leash. He wants to go every person when I take him outside

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Corey
pitbull
10 Months
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Corey
pitbull
10 Months

My dog is always excited to see me but likes to bite and jump. I figured out that giving him a toy combats the biting a lot but he still likes to jump. I want him to be able to be a great house dog but I don’t want my guests to be afraid of him because of his bad habits. Also, he isn’t that great at walking on the leash he walks crisscross and sometimes doesn’t want to walk at all I live in Georgia and I would love to take him to the dog park to interact with other dogs.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Milson
Bull Terrier
7 Months
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Milson
Bull Terrier
7 Months

Our dog continues to jump and bite whenever she gets excited. It's becoming a real problem. We are completely unsure of the best way to stop her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the articles I have linked below Jumping: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to help you in person with this. The issue could be true aggression, or it could be pup simply trying to initiate play by treating you like another dog. At this age the second is most likely, but you would want someone to evaluate in person to be sure. If it is the second issue, I would work with a trainer to build pup's impulse control with things like the Leave It and other directional commands. I would also build pup's overall respect and trust for you through things like the obedience command practice. If there is true aggression present, more safety measure and a more intensive training program will be needed. Obedience method https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kringle
Labrador Retriever / shep / mailoise
6 Months
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Kringle
Labrador Retriever / shep / mailoise
6 Months

1) Biting & jumping
2) walking - he's like having a marlin on a fishing line!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michele, Is pup biting out of excitement and play - rough puppy mouthing, or is pup acting aggressive, with intent to harm you? If pup is aggressive, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, comes well recommended by their clients with similar aggression needs, and will work with you one-on-one to help in person. If pup is overly rambunctious and biting because they are excited and try to play rough, check out the articles I have linked below. Jumping - Leash method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Biting - Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I would also have pup work during the walk - sit before opening your door, making pup wait at the threshold until calmer first, opening the door a bit and closing it again whenever pup doesn't wait and tries to rush,. Heel while walking, Sit, Down, Watch Me periodically throughout the walk. Keeping pup's mind in working mode can help with some of the listening and respect needs, as well as keep pup from getting as aroused with all the exciting stimuli along the walk. Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you For the actual walk, check out the Turns method from the article linked below. Start this method somewhere calm like an empty cul-de-sac, yard, or field. You walk somewhere with space that's calmer at first. Don't worry about not going as far with pup at first. You will still be exercising them with all the walking, turns, and mental stimulation of learning to heel - pup may even be more tired after the practice at first. Expect walks to look like going in squares and circles in those areas for a while right now - that's okay. As pup improves, you will work up to the distractions of the rest of your walking route. Heel - Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Melinda
French Bulldog Cross Staffy/Bull Mastiff
6 Months
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Melinda
French Bulldog Cross Staffy/Bull Mastiff
6 Months

Marsha has begun jumping up and biting.
The first time I was scared and tried to stay still and firmly saying no but ended up tricking her to get her outside and locking her out cause she was relentless. I know that was the wrong thing to do, but I was scared.
Since then I'm no longer scared but she does it every day. And at first it was only to me but now to anyone.
I feel like it's when she has too much energy before we've gone for a walk. I can tell she is trying to play, her tails wagging, she's down on her front legs, she brings me a toy. But it's so agressive and does not stop.

So at the moment we are grabbing her and pinning her on her back to try and assert dominance.That works some times but not all the time - also it's extremely hard to catch her as one tiny move from me and she sprints away.
I've tried distracting with a treat then asking her to sit.
But she sits takes the treat and goes straight back to it.
I've tried ignoring her but if I turn my back she lunges and bites. I've tried clapping or a loud uh-uh to shock her but it just makes her more excited.
Right now I locked myself in my room until she calmed down cause I didn't know what to do. Thankyou.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Molly
Golden Retriever
14 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Molly
Golden Retriever
14 Months

When walking Molly, she likes to stop and greet other dogs and people. If we stop for too long she will start biting on her leash and jumping up on me and growling and grabbing her leash or me. She is very strong and I am afraid of her pulling me down. I am pretty strong myself, but I am 69 years old.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Molly is a friendly breed and will love walks where she can meet lots of people and other dogs! But yes, I can imagine she is strong and she will only grow more. I think it is important to teach her the "sit" command, along with all of the other basic obedience she needs to know. I'm an advocate for obedience training - it really helps to form a bond between the pet parent and the dog. When you train with an instructor, you also learn a lot about dealing with Molly in every situation. So, my recommendation is to sign her up for classes. She'll have a great time! In the meantime, start working on her obedience training on your own. Practice her sit" (and other commands) at least 10 minutes per day. Praise her highly and always end on a good note, meaning stop the training before she has had enough. Take a look here for sit and stay, both effective to control jumping. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-basic-commands. You can also teach Molly the "leave it" command and use it when she bites the leash: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-his-leash. She'll benefit from the "heel" command when walking as shown here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel (all methods are good). Good luck and have fun training!

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Beba
Molossus of Epirus
6 Months
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Beba
Molossus of Epirus
6 Months

Hello there,last days i ve encountered a big issue with my dog.She starts showing some "dominant" behavior.For example when i put food in her bowl and she starts eating i can't approach it she starts jumping on me and biting me ...same when she wants me to play her with her toy and i ignore her or if she is chilling and i go to pet her...i ve started to do some things like commands before she gets something etc but i dont know how to handle these 2-3 minutes until she calms down when she is jumping on me and biting me..if you have any suggestions i would higly appreciate it..thanks in advance

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like you are dealing with territorial aggression. Because this issue is complex, I am sending you an article with lots of information on how to correct it. https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-behavior-training/territorial-aggression-toward-people-in-dogs/

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Paxton
Maltipoo
4 Months
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Paxton
Maltipoo
4 Months

How to keep get puppy used to separation from owner

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Taneisha, Are you trying to get pup used to you being away at work, or leaving pup with other people during trips? I would first crate train pup. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once crate trained, I would practice leaving pup in the crate every day for an hour with a dog food stuffed chew toy while you are in the other room, then begin going on walks and shorter errands without you. Expect some crying at first, specifically during the first two weeks, while pup adjusts. To build more independence from you in general, you can also practice things like Down-Stay and Place, where pup learns to stay while you are in other parts of the house, instead of following you around all the time. A dog food stuffed chew toy can also be given to pup while they stay for longer periods as well. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ For staying with other people, I would pursue regularly socializing pup around other people, carrying treats with you to reward pup and have others give pup when they are confident, curious, or friendly with people. You can practice short stays places like doggie daycare or at friends' homes for a few hours if you really need pup to be used to being left for longer periods with others. If a specific person will be keeping pup, having that person develop a relationship with pup ahead of time through treats for saying hi, walks, play, and other generally fun interactions, can help pup feel more confident with that person when left, if that's an option. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buddy
French Bulldog
3 Years
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Buddy
French Bulldog
3 Years

When guests come over, he is anxious. Anytime someone bends over to tie a shoe or put their hand in a bag, he tries to nip. How do I stop this? Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Genette, First, I will say that working with a training group that has several trainers so that people who are experienced with fear can practice being "strangers" during the session will help the training go a lot faster than doing this on your own, so that might be worth considering. I would start by desensitizing him to walking past strangers using the concepts of the passing approach method from the article linked below - this method is related to dogs, but the concepts of passing someone over and over again while working on obedience and rewarding good responses of calmness, tolerance, and focus on you, rather than fear responses. Gradually decreasing the distance between him and the people who are helping you as he improves - the important part is to look for not only a lack of fear aggressive response but specifically for times when pup is actually in a calmer mindset and reward that. This walking can be done in your yard and even around the inside of your home. As pup improves and can handle being close to people, then people can practice being in closer quarters (with safety measures as needed to avoid a fear bite), and tossing treats to pup when he is responding calmly around them. Have the people toss treats while acknowledging him very little when he does well. Check out the section on shy dogs and humans, taking additional safety measures in your case because of the history of trying to bite. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ When pup can handle being around people in general in a variety of situations, then have people give him commands and let him work for the treat rewards to further build trust. Finally, have them go on walks with you, where you can hand off the leash to the other person and pup will follow them also, so that pup is working with and following more people in a calm, respect and trust, based relationship. I would also specifically have people practice bending down, then tossing pup a treat when pup stays calm each time (have pup back tied with a leash so pup can't charge them to bite when they do this). You want to repeat the reaching down to do things like tie shows or search in a bag intentionally very often around pup, rewarding pup each time they stay calm, starting with pup far enough away that they stay calm the majority of the time, then practicing with pup closer up gradually as pup improves and can stay calm when the person is closer also. This process helps desensitize pup to the act of someone bending over and putting their hands low, which seems to be something pup dislikes right now. If pup chooses to move away from the person when they bend over, you can also reward that, moving away when pup feels uncomfortable is a good response from pup - that is them trying to handle their fear in a more acceptable way and they should be allowed to move away in that case. I can be hard to do all of this at the pace need, with the right body language and speed pup needs to keep everyone safe and improve, so this is often much easier when working with a great training group who has a staff of trainers for pup to get used to lots of people, not just the one trainer. Always take safety measures like back-ties, going at a safe training pace, reading body language, and using a basket muzzle if needed, to keep everyone involved in training and interactions safe. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nyla
Yorkie mix
4 Years
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Nyla
Yorkie mix
4 Years

My dog is extremely hyper . I believe she has adhd . She pays attention to every noise and movement . When I try to walk her she gets of her leash or warpes my legs with the leash . Can can I get her to stop barking ,jumping and biting ,and clam down ? Should I get a professional train if so who should I call and is it expensive. She is a certified emotional support dog however she was never trained .

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aramay, Is the biting pup being excited and playful or due to aggression? Is it's due to aggression, I would highly recommend hiring professional help. If you do look for a trainer, look for someone who specializes in behavior issues and comes well recommended by their previous clients. Often a Private in-home-trainer is what's needed for addressing behavior issues, opposed to teaching commands or tricks alone. A class tends to be the cheapest training option, a private in-home trainer the second cheapest, and board and train programs the most expensive. Specific prices depend on where you live and how much training is needed. You can download the wagwalking app, create a profile, select that you want training and get more specific information about the price for training in your area, and whether wag has trainers in your area working in person. If not, you can google things like "trainer (your city or county or state)", then check out their reviews and websites, look for someone who advertises that they work with behavior issues, who comes well recommended by their previous clients and lives within driving distance to you. For private training expect somewhere between 4-12 training sessions to be needed, with you practicing the training yourself at home between sessions. The exact number of sessions depends on how much improvement you want to see, how much you practice the training between sessions, and pup's own ability to learn. At the first training session you can ask the trainer what their best guess for number of sessions to accomplish the specific goals would be, to get a more exact idea. Unfortunately, I can't recommend a specific trainer in your area since I do not know where you live, and likely don't have experience with trainers in your area anyway unless you are local to me. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bowie
Shepsky
5 Months
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Bowie
Shepsky
5 Months

When out walking Bowie can get excited with other dogs or birds and then starts to jump and bite at my arm. I have tried several techniques but it can be difficult to get him to calm down.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicky, I would start by stimulating pup more mentally during the walk to help keep their arousal level down - giving pup jobs to do throughout the walk, like a structured heel, Down Stay, Sit Stay, Sitting at curbs, Watch Me, and starting the walk out more calmly by making pup wait at thresholds before exiting your front door. Turns method for Heeling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Sit https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit For the biting behavior, I would work on teaching things like Leave It. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Check out this article and methods for jumping specifically. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump You may also find that you need an interrupter once pup is highly aroused, like an unscented pet convincer. Once pup's arousal is interrupted, run through several obedience commands like heeling with lots of turns to get their mind in a calmer state again. For the excitement, I would recruit friends with well mannered, friendly dogs, or a training group, and practice the Passing Approach method - if pup is overly excited about dogs and not aggressive. If aggressive, additional safety measures will be needed. Passing Approach: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs If pup is causing damage when they bite, I would desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle using food rewards, ahead of time, also, and have pup wear that during walks right now to keep pup from being able to bite you when they attempt to redirect toward you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harrah
Labrastaff
13 Months
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Harrah
Labrastaff
13 Months

My dog is from a humane society, we just got her a few days ago. She is jumping and biting people out of over excitement. She is wagging her tail the whole time. She wont stop and don't want to give her back. what do we do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Charlotte, Is pup acting playful or aggressive? Is the wag stiff and quick, or loose and relaxed looking? A stiff short wag is a sign of arousal and not always friendly or happy, but tense and can be related to fear or aggression at times. Pup's whole body language should look bouncy, relaxed, loose, and happy if this is done in fun. If pup's biting is aggressive in nature, I highly recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and will work with you one on one to help in person for this. Specific safety measures need to be in place and underlying fear or aggression or issues with arousal need to be addressed too. If pup is biting due to playfulness while excited, I would start by stimulating pup more mentally during play or walks or other times of excitement, to help keep their arousal level down - giving pup jobs to do, like a structured heel, Down Stay, Sit Stay, fetching things, Watch Me, training sessions, puzzle toys, dog food stuffed kong's, and calming exercises like starting a walk by making pup wait at thresholds before exiting your front door. Turns method for Heeling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Sit https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit For the biting behavior, I would specifically work on teaching things like Leave It. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Check out this article and methods for jumping specifically. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump You may also find that you need an interrupter once pup is highly aroused, like an unscented pet convincer. Once pup's arousal is interrupted, run through several obedience commands like heeling with lots of turns to get their mind in a calmer state again. If pup is causing damage when they bite, I would desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle using food rewards, ahead of time, also, and have pup wear that during walks right now to keep pup from being able to bite you when they attempt to redirect toward you. Check out trainers like Thomas Davis from the Canine Educator. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harley
King Charles Spaniel
8 Months
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Question
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Harley
King Charles Spaniel
8 Months

Is jumping up & biting & barking at us for no reason pulling on your sleeve
Iv tried to ignore & fold arms & turn away but he bites you from behind😔

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nella, First, it's important to determine why pup is doing this, to know how pup needs to be trained. If pup is doing this out of aggression, the underlying aggression needs to be dealt with and additional safety measures taken during training. If pup is simply trying to get you to play and trying to rough house with you, pup needs to be taught manners and this is a simpler issue. If this isn't aggression, check out the articles linked below for building manners. Jumping - Step Toward method and Leash method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Out - and sections on how to teach a dog Out and How to use Out to deal with pushiness, especially: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method for biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place - for times when pup simply needs to calm down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s If pup isn't already crate trained, I would also do that, and crate pup with a dog food stuffed chew toy when he is overly excited and needs to calm down: Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Finally, pup would probably benefit from more mental stimulation, like incorporating training into walks with things like Heeling, Watch Me, Sit-Stay, Down-Stay, ect...incorporating training into fetching, feeding part of meals in puzzle toys, kongs, kong wobbles, treat dispensers, and other devices pup has to work for, and having 20 minute training sessions a day, where pup practicing learning something new or something a bit harder than what they already know to improve current skills - mental exercise can do wonders for tiring a dog out, sometimes even better than physical exercise. When mental and physical exercise are combined it tends to be most effective at helping dogs be calmer afterwards. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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