How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump and Bite

How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump and Bite
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon2-4 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

Jumping is a natural behavior for dogs. Dogs will typically jump when they want your attention or if they want something you have, like a toy or a treat. If your dog thinks you have something he must have, he may jump on you and bite to get what he wants. Dogs will also jump out of excitement when meeting somebody new. Having a dog who jumps and nips at you can be scary and also dangerous. Puppies typically bite because they use their mouths to taste and feel the world around them. They do not know how much biting hurts; it is just a natural reaction for them. If you have an adult dog who is jumping and biting, it is possibly because her behavior was not corrected as she aged, leaving her with a bad habit.

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Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog not to jump and bite is imperative if you plan on taking your dog anywhere or if you plan on having company at your house. A dog who has bitten someone could potentially be in trouble with the law. So, you are going to want to have a dog who is well-trained, under your control, and not jumping and biting anyone around. For a puppy, teaching him not to jump and bite could potentially require several training sessions and reminders through repetition. However, for an older dog, you are changing habits they have built up over time. Either way, you are going to require some patience. Expect to spend several minutes a day, every time your dog is tempted to jump and bite, teaching her to forget this kind of behavior.

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Getting Started

Along with patience, time, and commitment to your dog's obedience training, expect to have treats, toys to offer, and the idea of the habits you would like to see your dog have such as sitting when a guest comes to visit instead of jumping and nipping at your guests. 

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The On His Level Method

Most Recommended

6 Votes

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Most Recommended

6 Votes

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1

Attention

If your dog jumps and bites you when he is excited, it's because he wants attention from you. One trick is to get down on his level instead of having him jump up to yours.

2

Consistent

With consistency, every time your dog jumps up and bites you, squat down to his level to give him affection and a treat to bite instead of you.

3

No touching

Without touching him while you are standing, only show affection once you are at his level.

4

Command

With this method, you can use a command such as 'down' if your dog knows it. If your dog needs to learn 'down', this is a good opportunity to teach him so he knows to lie down and wait for you to come to his level when he wants attention.

5

Tell friends

Teach anyone around your dog if they would like to pet your dog, he needs to be calm sitting or lying down and not jumping up before they are allowed to touch him.

The Expectations Method

Effective

1 Vote

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Effective

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1

Tempt

To tempt your dog, hold treats in your hands and stand in front of your dog.

2

Jump and nip

When he jumps up and nips at your hands, cross your arms, hiding the treats.

3

Key phrase

Use a command word or a key word such as "ah ah” or a command such as 'sit'.

4

Treat

When your dog sits, offer him a treat.

5

Step away

Stepping away, try the process again with treats in your hands that your dog can see.

6

Repeat keyword

When he jumps up and bites, use your keyword, “ah ah” and “sit.”

7

Attention

When your dog diverts his attention away from your hands and sits for you, offer him a treat and verbal praise.

8

Guests

Your dog will need to associate this with guests coming into your home as well as greeting you. When guests come over, use the same process holding the treats and the verbiage, so your dog associates the jumping, no matter the occasion, with the need to sit and be still followed by the reward of a treat.

9

Practice

Practice several times a day for several weeks before you expect your dog to be able to sit calmly and quietly without jumping and biting.

The Teach Early Method

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1 Vote

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1

Ouch

Letting your dog know that jumping is uncomfortable and biting hurts is a crucial part of training your dog not to jump and bite.

2

Jump and bite

When your dog jumps and bites, turn your back to your dog and use the key word such as “ouch” or “ah ah.”

3

No attention

Don't give your dog attention to your dog until he calms

4

Follows

If your dog follows you around when you turn away from him, turn around again.

5

Commands

Using a command such as “no,” “ouch,” or “ah ah,” keep your arms crossed and your back to your dog.

6

Calm praise

Once your dog calms, reach down to pet him and praise him.

7

Guests arrive

If your dog jumps at bites when guests arrive in your home, consider leaving a treat bowl near the door and offer your dog a treat each time he sits before opening the door and once your guest is inside.

8

Repeat

You will need to repeat this process every time your dog jumps up and bites to let him know jumping is not okay.

By Stephanie Plummer

Published: 11/30/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Archie

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Mixed

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One Year

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Question

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I have my dog for a month .He won't stop nipping me .I slap and stole him.I'm 67 and to May bruisez.need help

July 29, 2022

Archie's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the two articles linked below. If pup is biting to try to get your attention, opposed to true aggression, then I would work on teaching pup Leave It to build their self-control and understanding of what you want, as well as use the Step Towards method to move into pup as soon as they are about to jump, or the Leash method when you have a leash on pup or when guests visit, and finally the Out command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Step Toward and Leash methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Depending on how hard pup is biting, you may need to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle in general - so pup doesn't mind it and so that it's not only associated with situations pup jumps in. After pup is desensitized, then set up scenarios where pup commonly jumps and bites and practice your commands like Leave It and stepping toward. When pup doesn't jump when you do things that normally cause them to, like jump up and down, turn away from them, hold a toy, first get home, ect...then reward pup with a treat hidden in your pocket through the muzzle's holes. A basket muzzle should allow you to do this, opposed to a standard muzzle. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s If he is biting out of aggression that is something I recommend hiring a professional trainer to work with you in person because they will need to assess him to determine what type of aggression and what is triggering the aggression, then address not only his manners and obedience commands but also the underlying reason for the aggression. There should also be additional structure and safety measures, like a basket muzzle, crate training, teaching Place, and having pup work for everything they get by doing a command like sit first, to calmly build listening, self-control, and obedience most likely. Make sure you choose someone who has a lot of aggression experience. Ask about their experience with aggression and look for reviews or referrals from their previous clients who the trainer specifically helped with aggression issues with their dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 1, 2022

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Honey

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Dogue de Bordeaux

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10 Months

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Question

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Jumping

April 18, 2022

Honey's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elle, Is the jumping aggressive in nature, or more excitement and greeting based? If the jumping is due to excitement and friendly or playful in nature, check out the article I have linked below, and the Leash method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump If pup is play biting when they jump, you may want to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle and practice with pup wearing that once they are comfortable with one, to keep you safe until pup learns to have more self-control. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle her meal kibble around it. Do this until she is comfortable eating around it. Next, when she is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward her with a piece of kibble every time she touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed her her whole meal this way. Practice this until she is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that she has to poke his face into it to get the kibble. As she gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that she has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until she is comfortable having her face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while she holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until she can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when she can hold her face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while her face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed her a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until she is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while she is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As she gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long she wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give her a treat, until she can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

April 19, 2022


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