How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump and Bite

Medium
2-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Jumping is a natural behavior for dogs. Dogs will typically jump when they want your attention or if they want something you have, like a toy or a treat. If your dog thinks you have something he must have, he may jump on you and bite to get what he wants. Dogs will also jump out of excitement when meeting somebody new. Having a dog who jumps and nips at you can be scary and also dangerous. Puppies typically bite because they use their mouths to taste and feel the world around them. They do not know how much biting hurts; it is just a natural reaction for them. If you have an adult dog who is jumping and biting, it is possibly because her behavior was not corrected as she aged, leaving her with a bad habit.

Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog not to jump and bite is imperative if you plan on taking your dog anywhere or if you plan on having company at your house. A dog who has bitten someone could potentially be in trouble with the law. So, you are going to want to have a dog who is well-trained, under your control, and not jumping and biting anyone around. For a puppy, teaching him not to jump and bite could potentially require several training sessions and reminders through repetition. However, for an older dog, you are changing habits they have built up over time. Either way, you are going to require some patience. Expect to spend several minutes a day, every time your dog is tempted to jump and bite, teaching her to forget this kind of behavior.

Getting Started

Along with patience, time, and commitment to your dog's obedience training, expect to have treats, toys to offer, and the idea of the habits you would like to see your dog have such as sitting when a guest comes to visit instead of jumping and nipping at your guests. 

The On His Level Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Attention
If your dog jumps and bites you when he is excited, it's because he wants attention from you. One trick is to get down on his level instead of having him jump up to yours.
Step
2
Consistent
With consistency, every time your dog jumps up and bites you, squat down to his level to give him affection and a treat to bite instead of you.
Step
3
No touching
Without touching him while you are standing, only show affection once you are at his level.
Step
4
Command
With this method, you can use a command such as 'down' if your dog knows it. If your dog needs to learn 'down', this is a good opportunity to teach him so he knows to lie down and wait for you to come to his level when he wants attention.
Step
5
Tell friends
Teach anyone around your dog if they would like to pet your dog, he needs to be calm sitting or lying down and not jumping up before they are allowed to touch him.
Recommend training method?

The Expectations Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Tempt
To tempt your dog, hold treats in your hands and stand in front of your dog.
Step
2
Jump and nip
When he jumps up and nips at your hands, cross your arms, hiding the treats.
Step
3
Key phrase
Use a command word or a key word such as "ah ah” or a command such as 'sit'.
Step
4
Treat
When your dog sits, offer him a treat.
Step
5
Step away
Stepping away, try the process again with treats in your hands that your dog can see.
Step
6
Repeat keyword
When he jumps up and bites, use your keyword, “ah ah” and “sit.”
Step
7
Attention
When your dog diverts his attention away from your hands and sits for you, offer him a treat and verbal praise.
Step
8
Guests
Your dog will need to associate this with guests coming into your home as well as greeting you. When guests come over, use the same process holding the treats and the verbiage, so your dog associates the jumping, no matter the occasion, with the need to sit and be still followed by the reward of a treat.
Step
9
Practice
Practice several times a day for several weeks before you expect your dog to be able to sit calmly and quietly without jumping and biting.
Recommend training method?

The Teach Early Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Ouch
Letting your dog know that jumping is uncomfortable and biting hurts is a crucial part of training your dog not to jump and bite.
Step
2
Jump and bite
When your dog jumps and bites, turn your back to your dog and use the key word such as “ouch” or “ah ah.”
Step
3
No attention
Don't give your dog attention to your dog until he calms
Step
4
Follows
If your dog follows you around when you turn away from him, turn around again.
Step
5
Commands
Using a command such as “no,” “ouch,” or “ah ah,” keep your arms crossed and your back to your dog.
Step
6
Calm praise
Once your dog calms, reach down to pet him and praise him.
Step
7
Guests arrive
If your dog jumps at bites when guests arrive in your home, consider leaving a treat bowl near the door and offer your dog a treat each time he sits before opening the door and once your guest is inside.
Step
8
Repeat
You will need to repeat this process every time your dog jumps up and bites to let him know jumping is not okay.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Bentley
Labrador Retriever
10 Months
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Bentley
Labrador Retriever
10 Months

How do I stop my dog from jumping on me and other people?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amish, Check out the article linked below and follow the Step Toward method and Leash method. The leash method is especially useful for when pup is jumping on people other than yourself, so that you can enforce the training, and not have to have all your guests do so. Instruct guests and those living with pup not to give any attention until pup is sitting or at least calm also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Homie
Pit Bullmastiff
6 Months
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Homie
Pit Bullmastiff
6 Months

When he wants to play he jumps on me he bites but not hard

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A
Dane x
7 Months
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A
Dane x
7 Months

From shelters,large but still puppy. Keeps launching and grabbing arm and hand biting hard and shaking, hard to distract or get his attention when get one arm free he grabs at other one. If turn back and ignore he jumps onto my back and bites at hair. When on lead has perfect manners, off lead can't keep him calm and focused

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello MB, First, I suggest teaching the Leave It command from the "Leave It" method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also suggest working on obedience commands that require self-control like Place, Sit Stay, Down Stay, Watch Me, and Heel, in general. At home I suggest keeping a drag leash on him so that you can train in the moment. Check out something like VirChewLy chew proof leash. https://www.amazon.com/VirChewLy-Indestructible-Leash-Medium-Yellow/dp/B004HIM4XM When he understands what Leave It means then you can use that command and rewarding calmness, in combination with corrections, like the video below demonstrates. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg If you feel at all unsure how to do the training yourself I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you, or if you feel like the biting stems from true aggression instead of just over-excitement. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bagel
cattle dog/shepherd mix
10 Months
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Question
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Bagel
cattle dog/shepherd mix
10 Months

I have already been turning my back and ignoring when she jumps and bites, but she just grabs my legs and jumps and bites the back of my leg. How do I deal with that?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, Check out the article linked below and try the 'Step Toward" method. When you do this be firm. You are using your body language to convey that you want her to respect your space. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump If the jumping continues after two weeks of practicing the Step Toward method, or you are seeing zero improvement after one week (improvement may be gradual but you should see some pretty quickly), then check out the video below and work on building respect in general and adding in more structure. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cami
Toy poo
10 Years
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Cami
Toy poo
10 Years

Cami is been with me for 3mths now. When I go to pick up my other dog (who I had first) , Cami runs from wherever she is and jumps up and tries to bite my arm. I know it’s jealousy but don’t know what to do about it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elxyis, First, this is a behavior that I suggest you hire a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and behavior issues to help you with in person. I suggest starting by increasing the dogs' respect for you. Check out the following videos and articles for a overall doggie bootcamp, working on commands and daily boundaries to address pup's respect for you and overall attitude. Also, don't tolerate pushiness or guarding you. If pup nudges your hand, climbs into your lap uninvited or gets between you and the other dog, make pup leave the room. I suggest keeping a drag leash on him while you are home to supervise, so that you can quickly enforce commands with less drama. I also suggest getting pup used to wearing a basket muzzle as a standard thing during the day when you are home while you are dealing with this issue, and crating pup when you are not home or need a break. This dog needs a lot of structure and boundaries in life right now. Don't feel bad about being a bit of a drill sergeant with him for a while - It won't hurt him, it's a lot better than pup being re-homed, and biting you is unacceptable. Working and Consistency method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Out command - this command should be done with the help of a professional trainer to avoid being bitten: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Finally, you may need to set up scenarios where he tries to rush you around your other dog - while wearing the basket muzzle for your safety, and correct the behavior in real time also. If you work on his overall respect for you doing the above training I mentioned the behavior may stop on its own without having to address it directly. If that doesn't happen, a correction needs to take place as soon as he moves toward you to bite. To get the timing right without being close to pup you may need an e-collar or a second person to correct pup. For this part of the training I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with aggression to help set up the appropriate scenario and decide on the best way to do this based on you and your dog. This can be done with or without rewards. A correction for starting to push - with intent to bite when he got to you, needs to happen first, but after a few repetitions of the situation, once pup stops rushing, if he ignored you being near your other dog and stayed calm, you could reward him for that correct response also. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Russell
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
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Russell
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

Lately when we get ready for a walk he lunges at me He wants to bite if I try to ignore him he goes for my legs and shoes if I stand still he goes for my arms he’s 55 lbs hard to ignore

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, Check out the video linked below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I am having very similar issues with a 5 month old lab retriever. Has anything been successful for you and Russel?

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Malakai
Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Malakai
Husky
1 Year

How do I get him to stop jumping and biting? Especially when it’s bed time or he doesn’t get attention, he attacks me

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Roger
Golden Retriever
13 Weeks
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Roger
Golden Retriever
13 Weeks

Roger bites me, mostly arms and clothing. Won’t let go unless I can get to a treat. By then, I’m bleeding, or my sleeves are ripped. I take blood thinners, but the bites are deep and bleed a lot. I now wear long sleeves to hide the bites and bruises. I’ve tried: Kong’s (filled/unfiltered/frozen), frozen, damp washcloths rolled, teething toys, bully sticks, carrots. He walks well on leash, but is stubborn about when we go or not. I play games with him, ball, hide a treat under a couple cups. Then he bites and jumps. So into his crate. Help. I’m desperate. Everyone says to take him to a trainer but it not affordable for me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lucy, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal - especially for a retriever. It's not fun and pup is biting way too hard but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but they can also be a great way to create your own puppy class with pup. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ If you decide to host a puppy class or want to practice more on your own, here are some additional resources: check out these videos of a puppy class. Follow along with your puppy at home and practice the exercises to help with general basic obedience: Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Morticia
French Bulldog
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Morticia
French Bulldog
8 Months

My dog lunges and nips at us for attention, she will stop when we play with her but when we stop she continues. We want to play with her, but she will do this for hours at a time. She knows "sit" "down" and a few other tricks but chooses to completely ignore these commands unless theres food involved.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Louise, Check out the video linked below. https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg I also suggest practicing additional commands that work on impulse control, calmness, and building respect. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ruby
English Bulldog
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Ruby
English Bulldog
10 Weeks

My dog gets so excited she jumps and nips at peoples feet and faces and can break skin. Kids are becoming afraid of her. How can I correct this behavior? We put her in time out when she does this so she won’t get attention from us.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jordann, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
beethoven
spanial
4 Years
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beethoven
spanial
4 Years

He is in a rescue compound and we are dog walkers.
we can only walk him once a week so I understand the difficulty of not beingh able to be there everyday.He is obviously very exited when we arrive and will jump up and nip until he has calmed down after 5min or so. he is ok while we put a lead on but then
back to jump & nip.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
66 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about Beethoven. Lovely of you to be dog walkers and helping out dogs in need! It's understandable that this energetic Spaniel is acting the way he does because he is unable to get the exercise that he needs. My suggestion would be to bring a toy along with you, perhaps a tug toy or a Nyla bone-type toy that he can put in his mouth as a distraction to not nip and jump. Give it a try and see if that serves the purpose of distraction. Be sure to praise Beethoven for his good behavior and walk him as long as you can to tire him out. I hope he gets rescued soon!

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Broly
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Broly
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year

I have had Broly for about two weeks now, adopted him from a shelter with no bite history very sweet dog, recently he has been jumping and biting at random times and we tell him no or to stop but he just keeps on going and my family is now scared of him because of that. I need help to find a way for him to stop thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Oscar, Does the biting seem to be pup trying to play roughly and get attention, or aggressive in nature? If pup is jumping and biting to gain attention as a way to play, check out the articles and video linked below. Jumping - step toward method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump#method-1 Mouthing biting - leave it method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Rude jumping and mouthing, play behavior: https://youtu.be/EcwvUOf5oOg If pup's biting is due to aggression, him trying to dominate or harm, or something else that's also more serious, it's time to hire a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression to help in person. Pup will likely need to be desensitized to wearing a basket muzzle if aggression is an issue. Use pups daily meal kibble to reward pup for touching the muzzle, eating treats from inside it, and eating multiple treats, fed through the basket muzzle's holes as pup holds their face in it for longer, then given multiple treats as you buckle and unbuckle the muzzle. Practice all of this until pup doesn't mind wearing the muzzle because they associate it with food. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Casper
Pit bull mix
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Casper
Pit bull mix
9 Months

My mom and I (16) adopted Casper about four weeks ago from our local shelter. They told us that he had some past biting issues but we did not know to what extent... thought it was just issues being too rambunctious around children in past household. However, we have learned that he bites a lot and very hard. He has broken my moms’s skin on multiple occasions. We have concluded that he bites for attention or for play. If he gets too excited during play or we stop, he bites. If we’re sitting on the couch watching tv and he feels he is not getting enough attention, he bites. Even when we invite him to sit with us, he sometimes still bites. He rarely listens when we say no. He grabs arms and holds on. If arms are not an option he goes for your ankles, feet, legs, or honestly whatever he can reach. He ripped my jeans the first day we got him. We have tried the redirection of toys when biting occurs, which he usually stops biting us, but he then just thinks we gave into his ask for play. We also tried the yelping/ouch method, but he just took that as us playing back, and seemed to go even harder. Most recently we tried the vinegar water spray mixture, which he ironically enjoys, and proceeds to lick the bottle to get extra drops off. He knows basic commands; sit, stay, lay down, shake, and we have worked on leave it some. However, when he is in attack mode he does not obey any commands, and more often than not we have to physically make him sit and hold him until he calms down. No matter what method we use, we always say no bite in the hopes he will learn. He really is a great loving dog, so I highly doubt this is an aggression/ dominance issue. He sleeps with me at night, gives lots of kisses, and always wants to be close to us. It is hard to see a dog with so much potential have such a roadblock. I’m hoping you will be able to help us!! We have had many other dogs and never had an issue like this, I’m sure any advice will help. Also, I see in other feedback recommendations of hiring a professional. This is something I have considered, but I am not sure how that would work considering the current COVID19 situation. Thank you so much for any advice you have to give, I love him so much and we desperately want to help him past this, because he is such an amazing boy!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hayden, I would recommend hiring a professional in this case. Because of Covid I would actually recommend looking for someone who specializes in behavior issues and offers Skype training sessions. The trainer won't be there to help in person, but they would still be able to demonstrate how to do things over video, answer questions, ask more about pup's behavior to ensure the methods they recommend are a good fit, tailor the training along the way depending on what's working and not working, and give guidance overall. Check out Sean O'Shea from the Good Dog at the link below. He has several free videos and resources online, specializes in behavior issues like biting, and also offers Skype training sessions. He may not be an option, but a trainer with that type of experience is what I would recommend. You also need someone who can safely guide how to go about working with pup while keeping you safe - since pup is likely to protest anything he doesn't want to do with more biting. For that reason I recommend getting pup used to wearing a basket muzzle. The basket muzzle will allow pup to open his mouth still while wearing it and be more comfortable than a standard muzzle, but will allow you to practice the things that usually trigger the biting without pup being able to use his mouth to protest it and bite you. Pup needs his ability to use his mouth to protest taken away during training - in the past, biting probably got him what he wanted - which was to not have to do something he didn't like or to get attention. He needs to find out that biting is no longer successful for him as part of the process to break the habit. Once that happens, then pup can be rewarded for more appropriate behavior by passing treats through the muzzle's holes to him when he is obedient and responsive. The desensitization process should happen in a way that makes the muzzle a bit boring, and not something scary. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Sean O' Shea from the Good Dog: https://www.thegooddog.net/ Example of him working with a dog with a similar issue to what it sounds like your pup may have going on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maple
Labradoodle
7 Months
1 found helpful
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Maple
Labradoodle
7 Months

My dog Maple (she is a labradoodle) has these moments outside and sometimes inside where she will start barking, jumping and nipping at me out of the blue. This has been going on for about 4 months and we have tried almost everything. From ignoring to rewarding good behavior and much more. nothing has worked. What should we do.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
66 Dog owners recommended

Maple is a cutie! She is a combination of two very energetic breeds and that translates to a lot of walking and exercise. Every day - runs when possible, too. She is super smart as well so will need mental stimulation to keep her content. She could be acting up because she needs structure and direction. She will excel at obedience classes and if you are the one to take her, she will learn to respect and listen to you. Right now, it seems as though she does not. The behavior could be out of frustration too. I suggest looking for dog training right away. Also, buy interactive toys that present a mental challenge. She would do well in agility but will need to know her basic commands for that. Take a look at the Obedience Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-be-calm. Keep Maple well exercised and tired. Good luck training!

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Garlicc
Jack russell mix Australia cattle dog
4 Months
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0 found helpful
Garlicc
Jack russell mix Australia cattle dog
4 Months

Garlicc will always jump and bite when he wants attention. Had used the method of turning away and ignore him but he will continue to jump and bite. Been like this since I have him for 2 months. Please advice. thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cecilia, Check out the article linked below and use the Step toward method with you, and the leash pressure method with guests. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Also, check out the article linked below and use the Leave It method for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Finally, teach the Out command, which means leave the area, and have pup leave the area completely whenever they are overly excited and can't respond to other commands. Check out the section on using out to deal with pushy behavior once you have followed the section on how to teach out. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eli
Golden Retriever
5 Months
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0 found helpful
Eli
Golden Retriever
5 Months

I am my dogs main caregiver. I train him, feed him, exercise him and am home with him all day. When he is overstimulated, he will nip at my thighs or he will jump up and bite my arms but never my spouse. He has done this twice in a public place (dog park) where I have no toy to replace my hands. Is there a reason he only does this with me and not my spouse? How do I correct him?
Overstimulation is caused by playing in water

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
66 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am a firm believer in obedience training classes. You are the prime caregiver and Eli should respect you but he does not. Taking him to obedience classes will further cement your bond but also teach him to follow your leadership. Until you get to classes, take a look here. To get Eli to not bite: The Verbal Cue Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite-your-hands. To listen to you: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. Heeling is a way to develop respect: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Eli is of working lineage and obedience classes will give his keen mind a good workout and make him well-behaved. Good luck!

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Dekker
Australian Shepherd Dog
1 Year
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Dekker
Australian Shepherd Dog
1 Year

Hello, This dog showed up under our deck half starved and very scared/shy. After more than a week, we got him to come out and eventually interact with us. He’s had no socializing but is learning to trust us and is becoming very playful and thus hard to handle. He jumps and nips and doesn’t know any commands and just wants to play, won’t listen. We’d like to know how to start working with him. He seems smart and will make a great addition to our acreage. We also have a small spaniel that he would really like to play with, but he runs and jumps at her so she’s afraid of him. We can’t get him to settle down when he sees her because he’d really like to play with her. He’s not at all aggressive, just no manners or social skills. What’s our best options.

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Rocky
Chow, Lab,Husky
9 Months
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Rocky
Chow, Lab,Husky
9 Months

My dog is a very sweet dog, but I am struggling very much to train him. He does not listen to my commands when I have tried teaching him to not jump or stay unless their is food or treats. As soon as they both run out, he stops listening to me. He is at a phase where he is jumping and nipping the moment I am around him. He does not leave me alone to even walk without doing this. When I attempt to play with him, he gets overly excited and starts to nip and jump. I am stuck at how to train my dog and sometimes feel afraid that he will bite me.

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