How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump and Bite

Medium
2-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Jumping is a natural behavior for dogs. Dogs will typically jump when they want your attention or if they want something you have, like a toy or a treat. If your dog thinks you have something he must have, he may jump on you and bite to get what he wants. Dogs will also jump out of excitement when meeting somebody new. Having a dog who jumps and nips at you can be scary and also dangerous. Puppies typically bite because they use their mouths to taste and feel the world around them. They do not know how much biting hurts; it is just a natural reaction for them. If you have an adult dog who is jumping and biting, it is possibly because her behavior was not corrected as she aged, leaving her with a bad habit.

Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog not to jump and bite is imperative if you plan on taking your dog anywhere or if you plan on having company at your house. A dog who has bitten someone could potentially be in trouble with the law. So, you are going to want to have a dog who is well-trained, under your control, and not jumping and biting anyone around. For a puppy, teaching him not to jump and bite could potentially require several training sessions and reminders through repetition. However, for an older dog, you are changing habits they have built up over time. Either way, you are going to require some patience. Expect to spend several minutes a day, every time your dog is tempted to jump and bite, teaching her to forget this kind of behavior.

Getting Started

Along with patience, time, and commitment to your dog's obedience training, expect to have treats, toys to offer, and the idea of the habits you would like to see your dog have such as sitting when a guest comes to visit instead of jumping and nipping at your guests. 

The On His Level Method

ribbon-method-3
Most Recommended
5 Votes
Step
1
Attention
If your dog jumps and bites you when he is excited, it's because he wants attention from you. One trick is to get down on his level instead of having him jump up to yours.
Step
2
Consistent
With consistency, every time your dog jumps up and bites you, squat down to his level to give him affection and a treat to bite instead of you.
Step
3
No touching
Without touching him while you are standing, only show affection once you are at his level.
Step
4
Command
With this method, you can use a command such as 'down' if your dog knows it. If your dog needs to learn 'down', this is a good opportunity to teach him so he knows to lie down and wait for you to come to his level when he wants attention.
Step
5
Tell friends
Teach anyone around your dog if they would like to pet your dog, he needs to be calm sitting or lying down and not jumping up before they are allowed to touch him.
Recommend training method?

The Expectations Method

ribbon-method-1
Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Tempt
To tempt your dog, hold treats in your hands and stand in front of your dog.
Step
2
Jump and nip
When he jumps up and nips at your hands, cross your arms, hiding the treats.
Step
3
Key phrase
Use a command word or a key word such as "ah ah” or a command such as 'sit'.
Step
4
Treat
When your dog sits, offer him a treat.
Step
5
Step away
Stepping away, try the process again with treats in your hands that your dog can see.
Step
6
Repeat keyword
When he jumps up and bites, use your keyword, “ah ah” and “sit.”
Step
7
Attention
When your dog diverts his attention away from your hands and sits for you, offer him a treat and verbal praise.
Step
8
Guests
Your dog will need to associate this with guests coming into your home as well as greeting you. When guests come over, use the same process holding the treats and the verbiage, so your dog associates the jumping, no matter the occasion, with the need to sit and be still followed by the reward of a treat.
Step
9
Practice
Practice several times a day for several weeks before you expect your dog to be able to sit calmly and quietly without jumping and biting.
Recommend training method?

The Teach Early Method

ribbon-method-2
Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Ouch
Letting your dog know that jumping is uncomfortable and biting hurts is a crucial part of training your dog not to jump and bite.
Step
2
Jump and bite
When your dog jumps and bites, turn your back to your dog and use the key word such as “ouch” or “ah ah.”
Step
3
No attention
Don't give your dog attention to your dog until he calms
Step
4
Follows
If your dog follows you around when you turn away from him, turn around again.
Step
5
Commands
Using a command such as “no,” “ouch,” or “ah ah,” keep your arms crossed and your back to your dog.
Step
6
Calm praise
Once your dog calms, reach down to pet him and praise him.
Step
7
Guests arrive
If your dog jumps at bites when guests arrive in your home, consider leaving a treat bowl near the door and offer your dog a treat each time he sits before opening the door and once your guest is inside.
Step
8
Repeat
You will need to repeat this process every time your dog jumps up and bites to let him know jumping is not okay.
Recommend training method?
author-img

Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 11/30/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Patricia
Siberian Husky
14 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Patricia
Siberian Husky
14 Months

At first he would mouth my hands now he actually will bit me. I bought gloves that go up to my elbows. Now if he can’t bite my arms he goes after my legs or any part of my body he can get ahold of. My arms and legs are all bitten up and bruised. If I can’t stop this I will have to re home him.

Add a comment to Patricia's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Atlas
Siberian Husky
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Atlas
Siberian Husky
6 Months

He has a problem with jumping and biting guest or while on walks.
He won’t listen. He is to focused on what he is doing he doesn’t hear me.

Also, he has separation anxiety. It forces me to stay home because while my boyfriend and I are gone he manages to tear up everything he can see including a metal trash can.

Add a comment to Atlas's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Draco
Siberian Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Draco
Siberian Husky
9 Months

Draco has suddenly started to jump and try to hump me and then either bite me or try to chew his lead. This is only happening on walks and only after at least 25 minutes of a walk. This has all suddenly developed in the last week. He's previously tried to hump me at home, but was fairly quick to train out of that by ignoring/not giving attention. However, that hasn't been working well during walks because he starts nipping or biting his lead.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
945 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tim, I recommend teaching Leave It, Out and using the Step Toward or leash method from the articles below for the biting and jumping. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Step Toward and Leash methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Depending on how hard pup is biting, you may need to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle in general - so pup doesn't mind it and so that it's not only associated with situations pup jumps in. After pup is desensitized, then set up scenarios where pup commonly jumps and bites and practice your commands like Leave It and stepping toward. When pup doesn't jump when you do things that normally cause them, then reward pup with a treat hidden in your pocket through the muzzle's holes. Correct with the Step Toward or Leash method if pup attempts to jump. A basket muzzle should allow you to address the jumping and mouthing without having to get bitten in the process. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Since this is mainly happening on a walk, pup may be getting overly aroused during the walk, if smelling another dog that's getting him excited, especially if pup isn't neutered or there is a female in heat in the area. Neutering may help, but even that would also need to be combined with training too. I would see if walking in another area improves the issue. If not, it's likely not related to another specific dog in the area. The humping can be a sexual behavior from pup's hormones increasing at this age and pup not knowing where to direct those, or it can be a dominance sign, with pup testing boundaries with you at this age, or an arousal issue - where excitement or frustration is triggering it, especially when pup is already tired so their impulse control is lower. For any issues with respect, I recommend the methods from the article I have linked below. Respect and listening: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you You may also need an interrupter if pup is persistent, depending on why pup is doing the behavior. Check out the videos below for examples of interruption. I would use a basket muzzle in combination, since pup seems to think it's okay to use his mouth to get his way right now, until pup's behavior improves and pup isn't mouthing anymore. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcwvUOf5oOg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Draco's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Rex
Male jack russell
14 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rex
Male jack russell
14 Months

Constantly jumping and nipping..also chewing things

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
945 Dog owners recommended

Hello Betty, Check out the two articles linked below. If pup is biting to try to get your attention, opposed to true aggression, then I would work on teaching pup Leave It to build their self-control and understanding of what you want, as well as use the Step Towards method to move into pup as soon as they are about to jump, or the Leash method when you have a leash on pup or when guests visit, and finally the Out command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Step Toward and Leash methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Depending on how hard pup is biting, you may need to desensitize pup to wearing a basket muzzle in general - so pup doesn't mind it and so that it's not only associated with situations pup jumps in. After pup is desensitized, then set up scenarios where pup commonly jumps and bites and practice your commands like Leave It and stepping toward. When pup doesn't jump when you do things that normally cause them to, like jump up and down, turn away from them, hold a toy, first get home, ect...then reward pup with a treat hidden in your pocket through the muzzle's holes. A basket muzzle should allow you to do this, opposed to a standard muzzle. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Rex's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Dovor
Golden Retriever
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dovor
Golden Retriever
6 Months

My dog won’t stop jumping on and biting me. It is not teething, he has his adults teeth now. I’ve tried the “teach early method” and to teach him to sit, but this does not work in the backyard or when he is excited. I try distracting him with a toy and everything.
He bites harder as he grows and i can’t take it anymore.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
240 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

Add a comment to Dovor's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd