How to Train Your Dog to Poop in a Designated Area

Medium
4-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Teaching your dog to poop in one designated area is beneficial for the grass in your yard as well as making clean up easy for you. You can reserve special spaces in your yard specifically for your dog to poop. Giving your dog his own bathroom space will keep the rest of your yard open and free of poop so you will not have to worry about children playing in or stepping in your dog's mess before you can clean it up. Keeping your dog's poop in one area of your yard can save your grass too.

You can train your dog to poop in one area of a grassy space, or you can teach your dog to poop specifically in rocks away from social spaces within your yard. City dwelling dogs or tiny breeds can also be trained to poop in one area of your home or apartment to avoid concrete walks outside or extreme weather conditions. 

Defining Tasks

Giving your dog a designated space to poop takes repetition, treats, and a little bit of time for your dog to get used to new routines. Plan a particular area before you begin to train your dog and avoid changing this particular pooping spot. Especially within your home or your apartment, be sure to designate a special pooping spot for your dog, so he does not have accidents elsewhere where you do not want him to go. If your dog is already house trained, teaching a designated area may require a little bit of extra time because you are retraining and asking your dog to forget old habits. However, if you have a puppy who is house training for the first time, setting your expectations with a place for your puppy to poop all the time instead of having free reign of your yard or home will be much quicker and part of the normal housetraining process.

Getting Started

You will need a leash to direct your dog to the proper location for designated pooping. Also, be sure to have on hand a supply of special treats specifically for training your dog. As mentioned above, have your designated pooping area already planned out and decided upon before you begin this training, so you do not confuse your dog by changing spaces mid-training. If you are training a new puppy, this may take up to six weeks to house train your dog. However, part of the house training process will include using this designated space specifically for going potty.  If you have an older dog used to having free reign of your yard or your home and you are trying to teach him one specific designated area for pooping, you may require a little more time and patience before he understands the new habit and comprehends exactly what you expect each time he needs to poop.

The Poop Spot Method

Most Recommended
9 Votes
Step
1
Pick a spot
Once you have picked your designated poop spot for your dog, place a scoop of your dog's poop in that spot and leave it in the area. Be sure other areas of your yard or the space where your dog will frequent for play are clean of urine and poop.
Step
2
Go potty
Take your dog to the spot where you have left the poop and use it command such as “go potty.” If your dog begins to sniff around, reward him with praise, repeating the command “go potty.”
Step
3
No play
Avoid letting your dog play in this area and avoid letting your dog into other areas to play until he has pooped.
Step
4
Scent
With the scent of the poop you have left in the area, your dog should begin to sniff around with interest and potentially poop there as well.
Step
5
Poop
If your dog can poop when you show him his designated spot, give him verbal praise as well as a treat.
Step
6
Redirecting
Avoid punishing your dog if he poops elsewhere. Offer verbal praise and a treat when your dog poops in his designated spot.
Step
7
One pile
While your dog is learning that this is his special place to poop, keep at least one pile of poop in the area. However, keep the area clean otherwise because too much poop will deter your dog from wanting to go there.
Step
8
Accidents
If your dog has an accident elsewhere, clean it up quickly so he does not sniff and relate the space as a spot to use. Give your dog zero attention, praise, or treats. Be sure you are consistently taking your dog to the right area every time he needs to go potty.
Step
9
After meals
Watch your dog after meals after waking and after playtime and be sure to visit the designated pooping spot with your dog during training, so he begins to understand that is his spot for pooping specifically.
Recommend training method?

The Leash Training Method

Effective
3 Votes
Step
1
Leash walk
With your dog on a leash, walk him to the designated poop spot and let him sniff around.
Step
2
One place
Every time you take your dog outside, use the leash and walk him to the designated spot. Avoid letting your dog play in this area and use the leash to keep him confined to the specific space you have designated as his pooping spot until he has pooped.
Step
3
Meals and naps
Be sure to take him to the designated spot on his leash after mealtime, playtime, and waking from sleep.
Step
4
Habit
Over time, your dog will get used to going to that specific spot every time he needs to poop. As your dog begins to walk himself to your designated pooping spot you may begin to let him go off his leash.
Step
5
Off-leash
The first few times your dog is off his leash be sure to walk with him, encouraging him to use his designated poop spot. After several days of escorting him to the poop area off leash, begin to let him go on his own.
Step
6
Playing
If your dog begins to play in that area, encourage him to go elsewhere to play, and if your dog has an accident in a zone that is not the designated poop spot, clean it up and take him to your designated area.
Step
7
Accidents
If your dog has accidents elsewhere, clean up and ignore the behavior.
Step
8
Reward
Reward your dog's positive behavior with praise and treats every time he poops in your designated spot.
Recommend training method?

The Desginated Area Method

Least Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Potty needs
Choose a space specifically for your dog’s potty needs. This area should be free of any distractions and kept clean. Take him to his specific area and use a verbal cue such as “Go potty.”
Step
2
Stay in area
Keep your dog in that area until he eliminates. Offer your pup a reward in the form of a treat and verbal praise.
Step
3
Reward
If you are trying to train your dog to go in one spot, bear in mind you may only want to offer the reward if he uses that spot.
Step
4
Rest and play
Carry on with your day allowing your dog to play and rest.
Step
5
After meals
After meals, when you return home from being away, and anytime your dog goes outside, take him to his special potty area.
Step
6
Go potty
Using your command words such as “go potty,” leave your dog for a few minutes in this area and wait for him to poop.
Step
7
Using area
The more your dog uses this space for pooping, the more the area will smell like him and remind him that this is his special potty place. However, be sure to keep it clean because if left with more than one pile of poop, your dog may begin to refuse the area and want to go elsewhere.
Step
8
Treat
Reward your dog for good behavior and repeat the steps above. Pay attention to your dog during normal activities and watch his body language. Your puppy may spin around, pace, or wag his behind a little more when he has to eliminate. Knowing these signs will help you to get your dog to his potty place within an appropriate time.
Step
9
Accident
If your puppy has an accident or poops outside of his designated area, clean it up quickly without punishing the dog.
Step
10
Special spot
Take your dog to his special potty place and repeat the steps above, rewarding him if he eliminates again.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 01/01/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Dozer
Mix (Corgie/Shepherd?)
5 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Dozer
Mix (Corgie/Shepherd?)
5 Years

We just adopted a dog. I want to make him a designated spot to poo in the yard but what size should I make it? He’s about 2 1/2 feet long and weight about 35 lbs. Thank you for you expertise.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tera, I suggest making the spot at least three times as long as he is, so at least 7.2 ft long by 3 ft wide, or about 5 ft x 5 ft. You can make it larger (an entire back portion of the yard or corner of the yard for instance) but making it at least three times as long as he is will give him at least enough room to circle around, walk it, and sniff. If you keep it small make sure you scoop his poop frequently or he may refuse to go potty on it if there are multiple droppings. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rex
German Shepherd
3 Months
0 found helpful
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Rex
German Shepherd
3 Months

Hello,
We've had our dog for about a month and he is well pee trained but our family does not approve of it when he poops in our yard. So we want him to poop in our unused bathroom that has a hole quite big enough for him to poop in but small enough so that he doesn't fall inside. Can we train him to poop right in that spot?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ume, You can likely train him to poop in that part of the bathroom near the hole within a couple of feet, any maybe even within a one-foot radius, but expecting him to poop in a hole that small will be very difficult. Some especially observant dogs could learn it with several months practice of you lining them up just right and rewarding with treats for getting closer and close, but many dogs need to be able to circle around, sniff and move around more than such a tiny small would allow. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Koleon
pit bull terrier
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Koleon
pit bull terrier
7 Months

My dog is already potty trained but I don’t have a fence so he wants me to take him all around the neighborhood to poop instead of pooping in my yard. I want to start taking him to one spot in my backyard but I’m not sure how to get him to go where I want him to go. How can I train him to go in my backyard instead of trying to go all over the neighborhood?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nydia, First of all, purchase a spray designed to encourage a dog to use the bathroom. It is usually called 'Hurry Spray', 'Puppy Training Spray', 'Go Here', or something similar. Spray that on the area where you would like for him to go right before you take him there. When you get to that area, tell him to 'Go Potty' and let him sniff where you sprayed. If he does not go there after a five minutes, then walk him up and down in a ten foot line in that area. This is to get his bowels moving. After you have done that, lead him back to the spot you sprayed, tell him to 'Go Potty', and let him sniff that area again. Repeat this every five minutes three or four times. If he does not go, then take him inside, place him into a crate, and try again in thirty or forty minutes. Be sure that when you try this it is at a time when he usually has to poop too. Start this process when you have a couple of days where you will be at home, like the weekend. When he finally poops, give him three or four of his favorite treats, one at a time. Make sure that you do not give in and take him for a walk to get him to poop. He can go for one as a reward after he poops but not before. If you give in, then he will simply continue to hold it until he gets to go for a walk. You want to break that cycle by teaching him that pooping in your yard gets him rewards and not going equals heading back inside rather than going on a walk. By telling him to 'Go Potty' when you take him everytime, he will eventually learn that when you say that, he should poop if he needs to go. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tyson
French Bulldog
5 Months
0 found helpful
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Tyson
French Bulldog
5 Months

hello,
I would like to know what can I do for my pup to defecate in the grass, he is well trained to pee on the same spot of grass every time we take him but he cant just seem to be able to poop, he always poop when we are not present or during the night, we have never mistreated him or yelled at him, and we always rewarded him when he did something good.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claudia, Follow the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below. When you follow that method, also use a potty encouraging spray, like the article mentions. Using a crate on a strict schedule, a potty encouraging spray, and rewards all together should force her to poop outside, and overtime teach her to want to poop outside. Once she is consistently pooping outside when you take her, then you can go back to a less strict potty training method if you prefer, as long as she does not begin having accidents inside when you do so. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Holly
Labrador Retriever
11 Years
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Holly
Labrador Retriever
11 Years

Hi! My dog is an 11 year old female lab who is extremely well housebroken. She uses the bathroom on command with the term "park." She recently hurt her back and we are instructed to limit movement during recovery phase. We have built a real-grass grass area on our balcony and are trying to train her to go on her grass. She wants to please, but does not understand. She will sit on her grass but will not eliminate there in any form.

We have tried:
1) Taking her out on the balcony on her leash as we would when going outside
2) Giving treats while she sniffs the grass
3) Spraying the grass with a potty training attractant spray
4) Collecting her urine and placing some on the grass
5) Encouraging her with positive reinforcement

We have had no success or any progress in 3 days and don't know how to proceed.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lauren, In your situation you are doing all the right things. Keep doing what you are doing but you also likely need to gate the area off so that she has to stay on the grass, take her out there into the gated grass area and tell her "Park", and then simply close the gate so that she cannot get out. Since standing is probably hard for her, let her lay down on the grass if she chooses to and make sure that she has water and possibly a fan blowing into the area if it is hot (Don't let her get too hot), and then simply wait. Since she might lay down, purchase potty encouraging spray rather than using her own urine to prevent her from laying on her urine. Eventually she will have to go there. While she is in the enclosed potty area, sit somewhere where you can see if she goes, but where she does not feel like you are hovering and she may get in trouble. When she does go, immediately praise her right when she finishes and give her five of her favorite treats, one at a time, then let her out of the area. Do this for potty trips until she will immediately go in the area when you take her and say "Park", like she does outside. To minimize the amount of time that she is on the porch for and to keep her cool, the best time to do this is first thing in the morning, after she has held her bladder all night and really has to go, so will give in sooner. She will feel like she is having an accident the first two times probably, but your response and rewards will show her that when she goes potty there that it is alright, and she should become comfortable going there with practice. If it seems to be too much strain on her and harder on her than outside potty trips, then only practice this first thing in the morning for a couple of days, until she learns to go potty there sooner and does not have to stay outside for as long. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Fozzy
Shih Tzu
6 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Fozzy
Shih Tzu
6 Years

My Shih Tzu has a very big backyard and I have been taking him around the block to go to the bathroom now I need him to use the bathroom in the backyard he’s so stubborn he’ll refuse to use the bathroom and less I go take him for a walk I’ve tried to walk him around the backyard but he’ll lay down when I tell him to go potty and if I ask him if he needs to go poop he’ll wag his tail park and head for that street how do I encourage him to use the restroom I followed all the steps but all he does is lay down try to get in our chairs or wine to be able to be walked on the street

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lee, It's time to be strict with Fozzy. When you have at least two days where you will be gone for no longer than four hours at a time use the crate to get him to go potty in your yard. When he wakes up in the morning take him outside to go potty in the backyard. When you take him tell him "Go Potty", if he poops, then give him three treats, one at a time. AFTER he poops and eats the treats, then take him for a short walk down the street and back. He has to earn his walk by using the bathroom beforehand. Do not resort to walking him down the street if he does not go. If he does not go, then take him inside and place him into a crate for thirty minutes. After thirty minutes, quickly walk him back outside into your yard again, spray a spray on the grass that is designed to encourage peeing and pooping, such as "Hurry Spray", "Go Here", or "Puppy Training Spray", and tell him to "Go Potty" while he sniffs that area. Give him ten minutes to sniff around. If he goes, then praise him and give him the treats, take him for a short walk, and let him be free again inside like he usually is until the next time to go potty. If he does not go, then take him inside and put him back into the crate for another thirty minutes. Repeat taking him into the backyard and putting him back in the crate every thirty minutes until he goes potty outside. Expect him to be stubborn at first. He can go outside, he simply is choosing to hold it so that he will get to go for a walk. Every time you take him for a walk to get him to go instead of after he goes you are rewarding his stubborn behavior so be firm with him and start this when you can follow through with the training and keep taking him out every thirty minutes. A walk is always a reward for peeing in the yard beforehand. If he views the walk as a reward he will be motivated to pee quickly so that he can get to the walk part. If he needs even more help physically getting his bowels moving, then encourage him to chase you around the backyard so that he will be moving. Also feed him ten to fifteen minutes before taking him, or play active, moving games with him in the backyard. After running around with him, pause the game, let him calm down, and tell him to go potty and spray the encouraging spray for him to sniff. When he finally does go, also give him treats so that he want to go again even without the play next time. If that still does not work, then take him back inside and put him into the crate and go back to the thirty minute potty breaks and crate time. When you go on a walk with him do not let him stop to mark while you are working on all of this. He gets one chance before the walk, then he needs to keep moving with you during the walk. Only take him for a walk after he goes potty and poops for the day while working on this training. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hello Caitlyn it’s me Lee again it’s day two of fuzzy holding his poop I now have to carry him to the designated potty area because he refuses to go he’s even gone so far as to feign peeing Because he knows we want him to go potty but he refuses to poop in the area

To fozzy’s owner. Cheez. I am having exactly to same problem. I adopted a six year old dog. He has no problem peeing. He will pee anywhere on the property. But won’t poop. We have been taking him either for a short walk or to a doggy Park here in our senior complex. And that being the problem: neither husband nor I walk too well as we are up in our years and we must get our dog Dillon to poop in yard. But he will simply hold it. You can tell he is miserable. I am fearful he will get impacted as another dog of mine had done in the past. Honestly I think before we got him his owners scolded him and he is afraid to go and when he does he tries to eat it maybe to hide what he did. All we can do is keep trying. Fortunately my neighbor lets the dog go on her grass. But he won’t go on ours. Crazy.

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Question
Tallulah
Labrador Retriever
18 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Tallulah
Labrador Retriever
18 Months

Trying to train her to go in specific area. She isn’t weeing or pooping and seems to be holding it in. Give commands and on the couple of times she has done it lots of praise and treats. If I shut her in area she barks like mad. Any tips or is it a matter of time. Area is clean, sectioned off etc. Any help much appreciated. Thank you Jacqueline

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jacqueline, Give Tallulah more time to practice it. The fact that she has done it a few times already is a good start, as long as she is not having accidents inside your home. To speed up the process I suggest using the crate training method and putting her in a crate for four hours, taking her outside to the designated spot on a leash after four hours, spraying a potty encouraging spray on that spot to encourage peeing, while telling her to "Go Potty". If she does not go potty, then bring her back inside, put her into the crate and take her back outside to try again in an hour. Repeat this every hour until she goes potty. When she goes potty, then give her two hours of free time, then put her back into the crate for two more hours until it is time to go potty again, four hours since she last went potty. After it has been four hours since she last peed take her outside again, tell her to "Go Potty", and then reward her and give her freedom if she goes, and crate her for an hour if she does not. Repeat this until she will consistently go in that spot whenever you take her potty and you know her bladder is full. Giving her treats when she goes potty there should also speed up the process. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Blake
Maltipoo
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blake
Maltipoo
8 Weeks

Hello,

I have an 8 week old puppy who just got his vaccines. since he can't go outside yet we're having trouble potty training him inside the house. We use training pads but have trouble making him go in his designated spot. He just releases wherever he pleases. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chloe, First of all, if you live in a house with your own private backyard, then with your vet's permission you should still be able to take him outside to start potty training. Most of the dangerous diseases that puppies can contract like Parvo and Distemper are spread by the feces of other dogs or animals. If your backyard is fenced, keeping other animals out, then you should be alright. Other dogs are your main concern. Even if your yard is not fenced, your risk is small as long as you are not taking him where other dogs frequent, like your neighborhood sidewalk or the park. Check with your Vet to find out if it is alright. If you decide to go directly to training him to pee outside with your Vet's permission, then check out the article that I have linked below. I recommend following the "Crate Training" method to make the process to faster and to minimize the number of accidents. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you still want to teach him to potty somewhere inside, then check out article that I have linked below. Follow either the "Exercise Pen" method or the "Crate Training" method. Don't skip any steps or it may not be as effective. Also, since you wish to train him to go potty outside later, then I highly recommend not using pee pads. Many puppies will have accidents on carpet, rugs, and other fabric type material once pee pads are removed, and since you want to remove them eventually, you will want to avoid that. The article below mentions using a litter box. You can use that, or I highly recommend using disposable living grass pads. These are pads with real grass grown on them. Each one is advertised to last two weeks. Using real grass should help Blake transition to peeing outside more easily. I also recommend keeping the grass pad inside of an "Exercise Pen", even if you are using the "Crate Training" method, so that he associates the pad with a designated toilet area, the exercise pen, and not being allowed to pee in the middle of a room on something. If you are using the "Crate Training" method, or he is ready for more freedom using the "Exercise Pen method, then you can simply leave the door to the exercise pen open, for him to be able to go to it as needed. The "Exercise Pen" method mentions phasing out the pen, but in your case you will keep it and then transition him to going potty outside. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Here is an example of a real grass pad you can purchase: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00761ZXQW/ref=psdc_3024225011_t2_B005G7S6UI Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Laura
Yorkshire Terrier
4 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Laura
Yorkshire Terrier
4 Years

Laura is 4 years old. She just arrived at her new home with us 2 days ago. She comes from another owner where his home offered her a big yard for playing and potty time.
Now, she is with us and we live in a small apartment with a balcony.
We also live in OHIO where now it’s time for winter, harsh weather.
She only wants to poop on the grass. But 1. I would like for her to poop on the pee pads outside on my balcony so when is snowing we don’t have to go out elsewhere.
2. Is that possible? Even though she was under the same routine for 4 years?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bruna, I suggest using a real grass pad to train her to pee on your balcony. These pads are made from real grass, are disposable, and are advertised to last for a couple of weeks each. They are more expensive than pee pads but each one lasts a lot longer. Using real grass you should be able to train her to pee on the balcony. As first, you might need to make a larger grass area out of four pads so that it will resemble a yard, but once she gets used to peeing in that location, then you can remove the extra pads and use just one. Using this type of material should maintain her potty training in the house. If you switch to pee pads, because they are made of fabric, you run the risk of her learning to also pee on carpets and rugs inside. Since you will be taking her to your balcony and not doing the training inside, you chance of that happening is decreased, but using a real grass pad should ensure that you do not run into that problem at all. Below is a link to a real grass pad. Some of them come pre-scented with a spray that encourages elimination there. If you buy one that does not have that, then you can also purchase a potty encouraging spray to spray on the pad to further encourage her to go potty there. https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI To train her to pee on it, first take her potty outside like usual, but whenever she goes start telling her to "Go Potty" and giving her a treat when she does. When she begins to understand what "Go Potty" means, then set up your grass pad area on the balcony. Take her there on leash like you would outside, tell her to "Go Potty", give her time to sniff the area, and when she goes reward her with several treats, one treat at a time. Do not skip the treats because that will help her learn that the balcony is now an acceptable place to go potty. If she will not go potty there even after several attempts, then crate her for five hours, put a leash on her, and quickly rush her to the grass pad area on the balcony. Tell her to "Go Potty" and reward her if she goes on the grass pad. If she does not go, then take her back inside after ten minutes of encouraging her to sniff the pad, place her back into the crate for an hour, and try again after an hour. Repeat this every hours until her bladder gets full enough that she will go when you take her. When you know her bladder is very full, then hurry her from the crate to the balcony so that she does not have an accident on the way. You can even open the door to the balcony beforehand to make the trip faster. The grass pads will by far be the easiest transition for her, but another good option is to litter box train her and place a litter box on the balcony. Simply keep the lid on the box if the balcony is uncovered, to protect against rain. Take the lid off whenever you take her to go potty, since dogs typically need litter boxes to be unenclosed, with the lids off, to pee in them. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Choppy
German Shepherd
Seven Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Choppy
German Shepherd
Seven Years

Hello. Our family dog Choppy lives with us inside a house with no yard space. We weren't allowed to walk him outside (because we are children) so he never learned to use the bathroom except for the old garage inside the house. We didn't have a car so the garage is all for him. This past year whenever he is upset with us (e.g. We didnt give him food from the table, we weren't home at night, we didn't let him play with the dog from upstairs) he would poop on the hallways surrounding the garage. He'd pee and poop along the WHOLE stretch of the hallway. Usually we just clean it up and ignore him but it has been going on and on and on and i just had enough. Today, at 6 am i woke up and swept the poop and brushed the pee (we also clean it with bleach to mask the smell; hasn't worked, so far) . Then at 1 pm i come home to MORE poop and pee, i swept it and ignored him. And tonight, at 11 pm when i go to get something downstairs and see MORE POOP AND PEE. AGAIN. So i calmly gave him attention again and tried to call him downstairs to the hallway and he hides under the table when he sees me looking at the poop and pee. He hides under the table because he thinks we can't see him when he stays there and we can't catch him doing anything wrong if he wasn't at the scene of the crime/if we can't see him. Anyway, i decided to leave him near his designated poop area... For a night (he has food, space, and water). Should i not have done that?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Selena, First, any remaining poop and pee smell where he had the accidents in the past will encourage him to use the bathroom in the same spots again, especially since the only thing that makes the garage floor very different from the hard floor in the house is the smell of his pee and poop in the garage from before. Bleach will NOT remove the smell. You have to have a spray that contains ENZYMES. Some pet specific sprays, like nature's miracle, will say on the bottle that it contains enzymes. Look for somewhere on the bottle that says enzymes. Use a spray that contains enzymes to remove the smell on the entire area that he has had poop and pee accidents at before. Second, if he pooped three or more times in one day, he may actually have an upset stomach right now. Keep an eye on how soft and frequent his poop is to see if his stomach is upset. It could also be a sign of anxiety. If he has an upset stomach, then the pooping is not on purpose. He can't help it until his digestive system is better again. Eating some type of people food, a new brand of dog food, or having worms are common causes for an upset stomach. Eating people food is the most likely cause if that happens often. If it's anxiety, then you will need to figure out why he is anxious. It sounds like being alone or yelled at could be the reason. If it's yelling at him, then that needs to stop. Your family can be firm with him but fair and gentle at the same time while your family teaches him - rather than yelling or being harsh. If being alone is causing the anxiety, then try giving him toys that contain his dog food when he is alone, like hollow chew toys, Kong Wobble Toy, an automatic treat dispenser, or a puzzle toy that is durable enough that he won't eat it. Also, spend some time teaching him new tricks and obedience commands for at least twenty-minutes a day to help him build trust, relationship, respect and feel stimulated mentally. Third, once you have addressed any tummy issues and anxiety issues, then you can work on the potty training by rewarding him whenever he goes potty in the garage where he is supposed to go. By keeping an eye on him when you are home by keeping him near you, and by either confining him somewhere safe and pleasant when no one can watch him (like the garage with a chew-proof bed and food stuffed toys to keep him busy) or by blocking off the areas that he is having potty accidents in. Make sure that he can easily get to the garage if there is a doggie door to it, or that you are taking him to the garage often enough if he needs you to open the door too. If he is having tummy issues, then he needs to be going every couple of hours until he is feeling better. Confining him in the garage for the night is alright as long as a couple of things have been done: 1. You have made sure that there is nothing dangerous in there, like anti-freeze or something he can chew up or hurt himself with or eat. 2.. You have given him something comfortable enough to sleep on - that he cannot tear up and eat. 3. It is not too cold for him in the garage overnight. 4. His sleeping spot is in a clean area, away from any poop and pee. 5. You have addressed any anxiety and given him something good to do, like chewing on a safe chew toy or a food stuffed chew toy. 6. He is not locked out there all the time, 24 hrs a day, during the day and night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucas
German Shepard/boxer mix
7 Months
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Lucas
German Shepard/boxer mix
7 Months

Due to our illness /we are senior citizens ,our puppy was allowed to go in the backyard. Now we are trying to train him to go outside and in the parks, we live in nyc. He has learned to pee outside but we walk and walk him but he will hold his poop till he gets back home and go in the backyard. Any suggestions ? Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jerry, He might be distracted or intimidated by the smell of other dogs and new places. I suggest starting by taking him to very boring places with potentially fewer smells and simply hanging out in those locations all day, such as taking a picnic and book and spending the day at a park often to get him familiar with it. When he pees or poos somewhere new, give him four treats, one at a time. You can slow purchase a potty encouraging spray like "Go Here", Hurry", "Potty Encouraging Spray", ect... And spray it where you want him to go but spending time in those types of places and giving treats will be the most important steps. Also, try taking him outside thirty-minute after he eats to encourage him to go even more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Fida
Labridor
3 Years
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Fida
Labridor
3 Years

My dog is poopy at the place he lives how to prevent poopy in his crate . I do take her for a walk just after the meals but instead she prefer to potty early in the morning .what don't suggest

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Frida, Most dogs need to pee when they first wake up and poop after they eat, which means they need to be taken outside twice in the morning and watched to make sure they go if they are having accidents inside. If she has been having accidents in the crate then I suggest taking her outside earlier in the morning, cleaning the crate thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes (it must contains Enzymes), and making sure her crate is only large enough for her to lay down, stand up, and turn around and not so big that she can use the bathroom in one end and stand in the other end to avoid the pee or poop. Also, make sure there is nothing absorbent like a soft bed or towel in the crate. Look into Primopad.com if you need a non-absorbent bed to put in the crate. You can also tie the primopad corners down to keep her from chewing the corners of the bed. If she is having frequent accidents during the day too, even in the crate, and this is recent, then have a vet check her out to make sure she does not have a urinary tract infection or other issue. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Turbo
German Shepherd
4 Months
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Turbo
German Shepherd
4 Months

I am crate training my dog and trying to teach her to go potty in a specific area. She has peeing down pretty well but I’m trying to teach her to poop in a specific spot as well. Should the areas be in a different location? Also, I know that pooping is obviously not as regular of an occurrence as peeing so do I still need to be strict with her and put her back in the crate if she doesn’t go poop? Or if she pees, do I allow her do play with our other dog for a while and then put her back?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, The pee and poop area can be the same area. There will be times when you want to crate her again and times when you can give her freedom after peeing. Pay attention to when she tends to poop. Most puppies will poop within 45 minutes of eating a meal two to three times a day. Some will poop mid-morning and late afternoon, ect...Pay attention to her schedule. Anytime you suspect she still has to poop or will have to poop soon, crate her again until she goes poop outside too. If she has already pooped during that part of the day and probably won't need to again until that afternoon or evening you can give her freedom after peeing even if she didn't poop then. When you are unsure what to do, attach her to yourself with a 6 or 8 foot leash so that she will stay close by for you to notice any signals that she has to go - like circling, sniffing, trying to sneak off, pulling hard on the leash, crying or squatting. This also prevents her from sneaking off to poop - which most puppies will do to have privacy. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Charlie
Dashalier
17 Weeks
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Charlie
Dashalier
17 Weeks

Hi there,

I am trying to housetrain our puppy however haven’t been that successful. He is still having accidents and is in consistent peeing on the puppy pads and the pet loo. He regularly goes to the toilet in the house as he is an indoor dog rather in the down stairs area which is where we at wanting him to go. More importantly I want to train him to not poo upstairs.

Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rachael, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method. The article talks about litter box training but you can use the same steps with a pee pad or real grass pad also. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy You can also attach him to yourself with a six to eight-foot leash when you are home instead, watch him very carefully, and take him potty on the leash every two- and-a-half hours. The key is to supervise him or confine him well enough that the accidents up stairs stop, then to take him to the area he is supposed to go on on leash to help him learn. Tell him to "Go Potty" once he is down there, then give him four treats, one at a time, when he goes potty - the treats will help him want to go there more often. The more accidents he has the longer it will take to teach him. The more times that he pees in the right spot and is rewarded, the quicker he will learn. Some smaller dogs also take longer to learn. The world is a lot bigger and traveling to his spot down stairs is a lot further if your legs are short, so try to stay consistent and not give up. Also, if he tends to have accidents on carpets and rugs, then he might be confusing the fabric of the pee pads with other soft items. If that's the case, I suggest switching to real grass pads instead. You can also switch to a litter box, but the pads tend to be easier for a dog to learn. Real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9306292971755485621&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=pla-568582223506&psc=1 Porch Potty also makes a fancier, more permanent grass pad. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Border Terrier blue heeler
2 Months
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Luna
Border Terrier blue heeler
2 Months

So my puppy goes in circles and backs up at the same time when she goes number 2 how can I stop her from doing that and just stay still to go on the puppy pad?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Part of this is learned on her own and she is trying to figure out how to get into a good position with pooping, and it partially may resolve on its own as she grows. Also, make sure she isn't constipated. I suggest taking her to the pad on leash and guiding her around the pad to sniffing, then when she begins to poop, gently keep the leash still so that she can walk forward if she chooses, and it isn't tight while she is standing still, but she doesn't have extra room to start backing up. The gentle leash guidance should help to encourage her to move forward instead of backwards if she feels the need to move a bit to get the poop out. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Reuben
cockapoo
6 Months
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Reuben
cockapoo
6 Months

Hi,

Our pup has always went to pee and poo on our grass out the back, we have now put a fence up which separates pavement from grass.

How can we get him to pee and poo on the pavement?

We tried this last week but he literally holds it in then we finally put him on the grass after hours trying to get him to go on pavement and he only goes on grass

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Glen, Try gradually transitioning him. Cover a section of the pavement with a disposable grass pad or a section of sod grass. Take him to the area on leash and tell him to "Go Potty" and let him sniff it. When he goes potty there, praise and reward him with three small treats one at a time. Once he will go potty on that grass spot on the pavement, gradually remove part of the grass pad over the course of a month, until he will go potty straight on the pavement. Disposable grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4628430177348674255&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=pla-568582223506&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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George
Golden Retriever
3 Months
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George
Golden Retriever
3 Months

Our three month Golden Retriever George has a potty corner and had been using it but now he decided to go in the middle of the yard. We go out with him at all times but he takes of on us and uses the yard. He is such a sweet dog but we are out of ideas how to get him to use his corner. I keep it clean at all times.
Thank you for your help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Martina, At this age, he needs to be taken to his potty spot on a leash. He needs to be taken potty on a leash so that the potty spot is the only option for several months. Dogs are very habitual and to teach a dog to go potty in one specific location you need to practice just that location primarily for so long that the dog forms a long term habit of going there and prefers it himself because of the familiarity as an adult. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
German Shepherd
10 Months
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Max
German Shepherd
10 Months

My dog, Max, has been living in a closed cage since he was one month old. Of course I used to let him out for 1- 2 hours daily. I trained him to poop in one area inside the cage. A few months later, when he became big enough, I started letting out in the backyard from evening till next day early morning. At the beginning, he used to poop in different soil areas, which was OK with me, but later on, he became pooping on on tile area, and it became his constant pooping area! How can let him keep pooping in his cage which I keep open at night? taking into consideration that he eats on different times every day and it's hard to expect when he poops!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Johnny, You would need to walk him over to the area that you want him to go potty at, tell him "Go Potty", and if he goes potty there reward him with treats frequently. You would also need to limit his access to areas that you do not want him going potty on until he was in the habit of pooping in the correct spot again, and clean the tile with a spray that contains enzymes - which will remove the smell well enough for him not to be attracted to going potty on the tile again. Only enzymes fully remove the smell for a dog. The above description is the best way to teach him to go potty there and not somewhere else. Some options that are less likely to work, but might still be worth trying, are: 1. Spraying the area that you want him to eliminate on with a potty encouraging spray consistently, like "Go Here" spray, "Hurry" spray, "Puppy Training" spray. 2. Block off the tile area and accept him pooping on the soil, and reward him with a treat whenever you catch him pooping in the crate - to help him get out of the habit of soiling on the tile, and to prefer the crate the most. 3. Clean the tile with a cleaner that contains enzymes - which are the only thing that will fully remove the urine and poop smell for his sensitive nose. Other cleaners do not remove it for the dog not to still smell and any remaining toileting smell will naturally encourage him to go potty there again. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hazel
Golden Retriever
3 Months
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Hazel
Golden Retriever
3 Months

Hes pooping everywhere i dont know what to do

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Remi
German Shepherd
2 Years
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Remi
German Shepherd
2 Years

We live on a farm and the previous dogs we had were used to pooping out in the field. Those dogs have passed away since then. Ever since we got our German Shepherd 2 years ago we struggled to get him to poop out in the field. Now he poops where ever he pleases. Pole barn, barn, on the lawn. My husband is tired of getting poop stuck in his lawn mower tires. Is it too late to train him to poop in the field??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lori, It is not too late but it will take a lot of work. You essentially have to prevent him from pooping anywhere but the field by either confining him inside (assuming he's potty trained) or attaching him to your self while you work around the yard so that he cannot wander off, then take him to the field on a leash to go potty every time. When you take him, tell him to "Go Potty" and reward him with five small treats if he goes, to encourage him to go there regularly. You will need to do this for long enough for him to form a new strong habit of going there, which will probably take months. It can be done, but requires commitment. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Quinn
German Shepherd
2 Months
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Quinn
German Shepherd
2 Months

I am bringing my new puppy home next week and would like to train her to go in one area of the yard, specifically a gravel area where we used to have a swingset. Though I have heard that dogs prefer grass to 'go' on? Is there anything wrong or harderabout training to go on gravel vs grass?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Due to the discomfort of standing on gravel and the lack of a grass smell it can be harder to train but many people do successfully train dogs to do it in cities where grass is limited. It will probably take a bit longer. You will need to keep taking her potty on leash (so she cannot wander over to the grass) for longer until she prefers the gravel out of habit. You should also reward her with treats when she goes potty there to help her want to go potty there each time - because it is associated with good things. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pepper
Bernedoodle
4 Months
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Pepper
Bernedoodle
4 Months

I've had my puppy for 3 weeks now. She is peeing and pooing pretty regularly in our designated outside spots. (she has a different one for pee and for poo, but at least they are both in our outside courtyard spot). She has no idea that she can go outside in the grass now that I've started to take her out on walks or to the park. How do I get her to start understanding that she can go outside in other spots other than her designated spot? Also, I'd like to eventually take her to work or go to a friends house. How do I teach her that those are 'inside" spots that she can't go in?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Theresa, First, when you take her to her designated spots tell her to "Go Potty" and reward her with treats when she goes potty. Once she understands what "Go Potty" means, take her to the other locations you would like her to go potty at also and tell her to "Go Potty" and encourage her to sniff. If she does not go potty either stay in that location until she cannot hold it any longer then reward her when she goes potty there. A good time to do this is a weekend morning when she has a full bladder so she will not be able to hold it for very long and you will not have to stay outside all day, or after you have been gone for a while and she has not pottied in a while. You can also take her on a walk at other times and if she does not go potty, return home without letting her go in her designated spot and put her in a crate for thirty minutes or an hour (depending on how badly you think she needs to go), and then take her on a walk again, telling her to "Go Potty". Repeat this until she finally goes potty when you walk her and tell her to "Go Potty," then reward her with treats after she goes so that she will know it was alright that she went potty there, for the future. The more places you practice the above routine in the more she should generalize that when she is told Go Potty it is acceptable to pee in that location, and go potty in other places too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year
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Lucy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year

How can i train my dog to pee and poo within minutes?

I'm a night shift nurse who's away from 7pm till 7am, 15 nights a month.


I don't always have the luxury of taking my dog to go potty 3+ times a day.
So i feed her on a schedule and give her the daily required amount of water (1L for 21kg)

I've had her for 5 days now, she pees within minutes of arriving to the designated potty spot, but poo takes much longer and several more attempts.
I don't walk her untill she poos. And try not to feed her untill she does. But I can't always wait 2hrs for her to poo, so I feed you anyway.

Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Roland, Most dogs actually need to poop within thirty minutes after eating. I suggest taking her potty AFTER you feed her. Make sure that still wait until AFTER she poops to take her for a walk though - like you are doing now. First thing in the morning you may have to take her to pee, then take her again to poop after she eats if she cannot hold her pee until after breakfast - the first pee trip can be quick though if she isn't ready to poop then and you are about to take her back outside after breakfast anyway. If she can hold her pee until after breakfast, I suggest taking her outside 10-15 minutes after she eats. Also, when you take her potty each time, tell her to "Go Potty" and when she pees and especially when she poops, give her several small treats in a row. Keep a small container of treats somewhere by the door our of her reach so that they will be convenient to grab on your way outside. Don't show her the treats until after she goes potty. Rewarding her after she goes potty after you tell her to "Go Potty" should help her learn to go potty faster. After she pees and you've rewarded her, tell her to "Go Potty" again if she might need to poop. Moving her around slowly and feeding her before taking her outside generally should help her need to poop. You can also temporarily use a potty encouraging spray, "Go Here" or "Hurry Spray" and spray it on the area you want her to go on to help her understand what she is supposed to be doing. Do this in addition to feeding beforehand and teaching her "Go Potty" with treats, not in place of those things though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eclipse
German Shepherd
1 Day
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Eclipse
German Shepherd
1 Day

Is it possible to have like a big bowl or a container designated for the dog to poop instead of just an area in the grass?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Luis, Yes it is possible to teach many dogs to go potty on or in something, but it will take time and work to get there. You first have to create a specific designated spot, like a large box, big enough for the puppy to walk around in to do his business in. You also want to make sure that the box is not slippery so that that won't be a deterrent. Don't go too small with the box at first, that will happen gradually. Once he is potty trained to use the box, then two things need to happen. 1. As a German Shepherd he will grow pretty big. This also means that the small box that he could walk around in before gets smaller in relationship to him. Instead of increasing the size of the box as he grows, keep it the same size. Whenever you take him potty, tell him to "Go Potty" and reward him with several treats in a row when he goes potty there. Later if he starts to get hesitant as the potty decreases in size proportionally, you can still tell him to "Go Potty" and reward him for pottying there to help him get over his concerns. 2. Once he is fully grown, completely potty trained, and has no problems going in the box with his full size, you can make the box smaller if you wish by either deconstructing it, cutting down boards, and putting it back together again (if wooden) or build or buy a new box that looks like the other box and has some of the elements of the old box added to it to make it smell the same at first. Only decrease the box by a few inches at a time though or he may refuse to go potty in it - it needs to be a gradual decrease done several times overtime, with enough time in between each decrease for him to adjust to the new box and like it alright (if you need to get it a lot smaller). In the end don't try to make it too small though. If you make it too small, it will be very difficult for him to go potty. Don't expect him to be able to aim well - if its small enough that he has to aim well, then it's probably too small. If he can just generally stand over it or in it without being too specific about aiming, that will be easier. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shadow
Greyador
10 Months
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Shadow
Greyador
10 Months

I adopted a dog about two weeks ago. I am having trouble getting him to go poop in a specific corner of the yard. After meals I walk him over (on a leash) to that corner but he refuses to poop there, he only pees there. Yet we notice that when we leave the house and he stays in the yard on his own he poops in the side of the house (where there is plenty of foot traffic).

How do I get him to stop pooping in one area and start getting him to go in a designated corner?? Thank you in advance for your help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ramiro, Check out the article I have linked below. Use the Crate Training method, take him only to the designated poop spot for potty breaks, tell him to "Go Potty" and reward with treats if he goes there. If he doesn't go, take him back inside and put him back into the crate if he likely still needs to go potty. You can also spray the spot with a potty encouraging spray like "Go Here" or "Hurry Spray". You want to make that spot his only option for pooping by using the crate inside, taking him potty on a leash, and helping him learn what you want him to do by using the "Go Potty" command, treats, and potty encouraging spray. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Expect to have to take him to that spot only in your yard on a leash for several months before you can trust him to go only there on his own- he needs to develop a long-term habit of it which takes time and repetition for a dog to create. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Toutou
Goldendoodle
4 Months
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Toutou
Goldendoodle
4 Months

Hi there!

We build a potty place for our puppy. She used to go in it so easily but since a couple of weeks she refuses to enter it. She pulls on the leash or completely stops. We are trying to attract her with some treats which works but we are worried because we want her to go potty in that place all by herself eventually. We clean her potty place often so I can't figure out what is the problem. What should we do? Is she simply in her "adolescent" phase?

Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marjorie, This could be an independent streak that simply takes some persistence and insisting she enters on your part, there may also have been something scary that happened while she was in there that she associates with that location, or the size might be too small for her to want to eliminate in there if the area is not at least twice as large as she is (dogs don't like going potty in confined spaces). Without being there to see her and work with her in person it is hard to say. If you have the option of temporarily removing the walls but leaving the potty area there and keeping it in the same location, you may want to try temporarily doing that. If she seems genuinely terrified to go there, then I suggest taking steps to help her overcome whatever fear has developed by sprinkling treats around the area and rewarding her several times in a row after she goes potty there. You may even want to smear some peanut butter on something that sticks up next to the potty area, so that she can lick the peanut butter while standing on the potty area. Unless she seems genuinely scared or you know of something scary that happened to her while in there, I would normally advise remove the sides of the enclosure right now and use the leash to move her onto the potty area. Jog up to the potty area so that her momentum will carry her onto it and she doesn't have time to stop in front. Once she is on it, give a treat, tell her Go Potty, and when she goes potty, give her four treats or pieces or her dog kibble, one piece at a time as a reward for going. (keep the treat stash out of sight though so that she doesn't just stare at your treat pouch the whole time). After a month or two - when she seems relaxed about going to the potty area again, then gradually re-erect the walls over the course of a couple weeks. Pause your progress with the walls if she seems to be doing a bit worse again and work with just some of the walls up first, before you add more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Miniature Australian Shepherd
4 Months
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Luna
Miniature Australian Shepherd
4 Months

We have trained our puppy, Luna, to go potty on a gravel pad in the backyard. She is fully house trained & rings a bell to go potty. When we take her out she goes right to her pad to pee & poop. However, she loves to spend time in the yard by herself during the day & I find dog poop in the yard. What is the next step for her to use the pad even if we are not there? We keep it clean of poop but always leave one behind. Thank you!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kathleen, Unfortunately, the only reliable way to teach a dog to only go potty in one spot in the yard, is to take them only to that spot on leash for about a year, before giving them access to other areas of the yard during times when they might have to go potty. This would essentially look like bringing pup to the gravel spot, waiting until they have completely finished going potty, including poop if they haven't gone yet during that part of the day, then giving freedom in the yard for up to an hour before repeating the same thing over again. If pup does't pee or doesn't poop when they may have to - no freedom in the yard. You have to treat the rest of the yard the way you would your house - no freedom in the house unsupervised unless you know pup doesn't have to go potty for sure. This process needs to be done for long enough for pup to create a long-term habit of it, in order for pup to instinctively do it on their own when you aren't managing. That can take up to a year for some dogs. Some can be sooner. If accidents are allowed to happen with any amount of regularity, then that's also counter productive and training may not make progress. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cody
Pomsky
8 Months
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Cody
Pomsky
8 Months

We just adopted a husky/pomeraian/? Mix from a rescue and we're finding it challenging to train him to go outside. We were told he was never outside before being rescued but that the Foster mom had gotten him to at least use the pads in the house. Since coming home he occasionally uses the pads just goes in the restroom or my son's room just as often.
We make sure to walk him after each meal but he wants to explore or play and if we try to get him to walk around his designated potty spot (where he has peed on several occasions now) he will lay down. He also needs to be trained to walk properly in a leash so I assume that's part of the challenge; is there any advice you can give us to conquer the bad habits from guys first home?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Renee, Because of his history with potty training he really needs to be crate trained for potty training to work. The crate will utilize his natural desire to hold his bladder and poop in a confined space, making it so that he is only free while he is empty and his only option for going potty is outside. If you intend to train him to go potty outside as your end goal, I suggest removing the pee pads because that can cause confusion if you do both, and lead to accidents on rugs. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Since he is older you can take him potty every 2-3 hours while home, giving him 1-1.5 hours of freedom (less if he has accidents then) after he goes potty outside, and putting him back into the crate whenever he doesn't go - and trying again after 1-2 hours in the crate. The goal is for him to only be outside the crate while his bladder is empty. If you want him to spend a little more time with you, then once he is in the habit of going potty well outside and isn't having accidents while sticking to the crate training schedule, then you can also use the Tethering method from the article linked below in combination with the crate training method, but use just the crate training method first to get him into the habit of going potty outside and to break the cycle of pottying inside. Crate Training method and Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Since your pup is older, when you are not home he can be crated for up to 5 hours, and eventually 7-8 once he adjusts to holding his bladder in the crate. When you are home, take him out every 2-3 at least though. Make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate like a soft bed or towel. If you need a non-absorbent bed, check out www.primopads.com The crate should also be just big enough for him to turn around, lie down, and stand up, and not big enough that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end away from it - too big and it won't encourage his instinct to keep it clean. To get him used to walking on the leash check out the article linked below. That article focuses on basic leash introductions, so that a dog learns to come toward you when they feel tension on the leash, instead of pull away. It doesn't teach a formal heel yet, but is the first step toward leash manners: Leash Acceptance article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash Heel Article - turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arya
Labrador Retriever
6 Months
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Arya
Labrador Retriever
6 Months

We rescued our dog from the humane society about 5 days ago. She has pooped inside every day regardless of ample time outside. She is very anxious and skittish and sometimes poops when crated. We can get her to pee outside when she is running to catch water from the hose. Otherwise she has had 2 accidents in the house with urinating as well. We need help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, It sounds like the real issue is her fearfulness. While chasing the water from the hose she is probably so excited that she forgets about her fear and relaxes enough to go potty - plus the activity encourages her body to need to pee. First, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate with her that may encourage her to potty in the crate. If you want to give her a bed in the crate, then use something like www.primopads.com . Crate her in a calm location away from windows and give her a food stuffed chew toy while in there to take her mind off of things. Use tips from the Surprise method from the article linked below if she seems fearful of the crate itself - the article says small dog but the training is the same in that method for any size. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If she can handle being close to you, then attach her to yourself (carefully so she doesn't drag you over) with a 6 or 8 foot leash to prevent her from sneaking off to potty. Use a combination of crate training and attaching her to yourself to prevent accidents inside. You can also have her wear a doggie diaper with a doggie diaper pad or human incontinence pad inside it while inside to prevent your home from smelling like urine while she is working to overcome fears and has more accidents - preventing your home from smelling like urine is important for teaching her to hold it inside either way. Introduce the diapers with a lot of treats, gently distracting her whenever she starts to chew at it until she gets used to wearing it. Check out the article linked below folllow the Tethering and Crate Training methods - since she is older the times will be a lot longer between potty trips. Pay attention to how long she tends to go between pottying and take her potty more often than that during the day. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Work on potty training by doing what I mentioned above, but your main focus should also be getting her over her fear of being outside and around you so that she can relax enough to potty there. Without getting over the fear of pottying outside, she will struggle with accidents inside. If she has an accident inside, quickly rush her outside, but don't yell or rub her nose in it or use tons of punishment because that could make her not want to potty in front of you while outside too and we are trying to overcome her fear of that and not make it worse. If she already seems afraid of potty in front of you, then take her potty on a thirty foot leash and let her wander away from you to go potty. Tell her to "Go Potty", and after she goes, toss treats over to her that are large enough for her to see in the grass as a reward for pottying outside. Spend time simply hanging out with her outside and sitting in the grass or ground - if she was never socialized outside, one of the things she needs is just to have time outside to get used to it. Keep the area calm and relaxed and avoid super busy places for the first couple of weeks - until she relaxes enough to improve with potty training. Continue doing things outside with her that she loves too, like playing with water. You want her to look forward to going outside, but you also want her to learn to associate it with pottying and not just play - so take her potty on a leash for potty trips so that you can keep her focused - using a long leash if needed right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cristina
Rottweiler Mix
8 Weeks
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Cristina
Rottweiler Mix
8 Weeks

My pup is an outside dog. I am trying to learn how to train him to do potty in one spot. We have a big yard and he tends to do poop all over the yard. I never see when he is about to use the bathroom. So I am always seeing the poop around the yard. How do I teach him to go in one spot?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cristina, Honestly, training a dog to go potty in a certain spot only requires taking the dog potty only to that spot (on a leash usually), and limiting access to other areas he may potty in while his bladder is full. Since he is loose in your yard all the day and unsupervised a lot of those time I cannot guarantee it can be trained under those circumstances. You can try adding attractant "Go Here" type train to a certain area regularly so that the scent will encourage him, block off the areas you most want him not to go potty in, and reward him anytime you catch him pottying in the correct location. Those things will help him but likely not give full consistency with it. An extreme option would be to cover all of your yard you do not want him to potty on with something that she doesn't want to potty on, while leaving the area you do want to train natural and a desirable place to go potty...Very few people want to cover their yard with gravel and create a wonderful grassy area to attract pup though. If you did decide to do so, you could later remove the gravel and regrow grass in other places too once the habit has been established for a year. The only real option here is to have him live indoors for the next 6 months and take him potty outside on a leash to his designated area outside, then reward him for pottying in that spot while he is still learning, so that he prefers going potty in that area later in life. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
German Shepherd
8 Months
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Leo
German Shepherd
8 Months

I am trying to teach leo to go potty in a specific spot instead of going where he pleases which is poop everywhere for everyone. But when I put him on his leash and take him to the spot and I say go potty on a stretch leash he just stands there. I've started this today early in the morning and he hasn't gone since the morning where I first tried meaning he is holding it in . He is a inside dog and usually we let him out and go but he does it all over the yard and I'm trying to train in 1 spot but he just stands there and acts like he isn't listening to me. Then I take him back in the house and soon as I take his leash off he's wimping at the door to go potty but I put the leash on and I lead him he shys away! Help me please.all day today he hasn't even pissed!! Nothing.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jeffrey, Most dogs need movement and scent to get help them feel the urge to go. First, I suggest using a potty encouraging spray and spraying the spot where you want him to go right before you take him each time. You shouldn't have to do this for more than a week once his own scent is in that area from pottying there in most cases. Second, keep your leash shorter, like 6 to 8 foot at first, and slowly walk in around in the area where you want him to go while saying "Go Potty". Be patient - at first it will take some time moving him around and him smelling the ground before he decides to go - he should get quickly as he improves though. When he does finally go, give him four small treats or pieces of his dog food if he likes his own food. This is to encourage him to go faster in the future and to teach him what "Go Potty" means - which should help him focus and learn to go faster in the future also, even after phasing out the food eventually. Walking him around slowly on the leash is a step that can't be skipped for this to work for many dogs - he needs to movement to feel the urge to go most of the time, and until he learns to sniff around in that area himself, you will have to encourage it. The area you walk him around doesn't have to be huge, but the walking around slowly - encouraging him to sniff is what's important. After he pees, if he could need to poop (when in doubt do this), then tell him to "Go Potty" again and slowly walk him around for twice as long as you did to get him to pee. Most dogs will learn to pee more quickly but need extra encouragement and reminders to learn to poop quickly. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jules
Pointer
5 Years
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Jules
Pointer
5 Years

We rescued our dog 9 months ago, and she has suddenly decided to start holding her poop/pee only for long walks or dog parks. We're working the "go outside every 15 minutes and reward with treats" method, but worry she'll out-stubborn us. How long is too long to allow her to hold it while training this way? She has no problem waiting 48 hours sometimes.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erin, I am not a vet but there is an ask a vet section on wagwalking under the medical articles section - it may be worth asking there. My general guidelines as a pet owner myself would be watching to make sure: 1. the urine is not dark colored when he does finally go. 2. He is still eating and drinking normally. 3. His poops are not hard or liquid diarrhea (which can be a sign of bad constipation also rarely), but are normal consistency. If all of those things are met and he is being given regular opportunities to potty, then I wouldn't be super worried about long holding times. It's not good long-term because your body needs to get rid of waste and not put constant extra pressure on your bladder, but temporarily until you get over a training hump I would just watch more for the signs he is eating, drinking, pooping, and peeing normally still. Ask a vet though to see if their answer is different and go with their medical advice above my recommendations. To help things along, be sure that pup isn't afraid of anything in the area where you take him potty, is taken on leash to decrease distractions (a long leash if he does better further from you), is told to "Go Potty" when you take him, then rewarded with treats after he goes (this will teach Go Potty to make future trips go faster), and walk him around slowly while on the leash to help him feel the need to go due to the movement. Also, taking him potty 15-45 minutes after eating can help get a poop. Spraying a potty encouraging spray where you want him to go in the yard, like "Go Here", "Hurry!" or "Puppy Training" spray can help encourage things along or adding another health dog's poop to the yard (just one so the scent will encourage elimination but not be too dirty). If your dog is smart he may have learned that if he goes potty in the yard the fun ends and he doesn't get to go on a walk, or that you turn around during the walk right after he potties...So he holds it to prolong a walk or get to go on a walk. The movement of running at the dog park and walking during a walk, along with the smells of where the other dogs have gone also encourage the need to potty. that's why simulating that movement and scent in your yard also can help. From a training perspective you will need to switch the order. Before he gets in the car or goes on a walk, require a potty in the yard, then the trip is a reward for pottying there first. Be willing to skip the walk or dog park for a few days at first while switching this order if you can't get a pee or poop out of him first. He will probably always naturally tend to poop more after running at the dog park though simply because of the movement - as long as he is pooping in the yard too when he has the urge to go, pooping at the dog park should be fine, it's just the withholding at home you want to get past (as I'm sure you know). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
German Shepherd and malamute
3 Years
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Luna
German Shepherd and malamute
3 Years

Hi there! We rescued our dog back in January and have since moved from an apartment, where she learned to pee/poo on walks, to a house with a fenced yard. We let her outside without a leash every 4 or so hours to pee/poop, but recently she’s been going outside and not eliminating. She’ll play or lay in the sun or dig. When we try to call her in, she runs from us. The issues are 1) we want to her pee/poop first, then play in case we need to leave (ie. before work) and 2) we want her to come when we call her back in and not run from us (it’s a playful/stubborn thing—she’s not scared). These issues feel related since they both happen in the yard but need help figuring it out. She’ll sometimes not eliminate after 30 mins, we’ll chase her down to come in, and she’ll pee inside later. Also, she is not food-motivated. She loves walks and belly rubs. In fact, when she doesn’t want to come in, she’ll sometimes flip on her belly across the yard as if saying “belly rub first.” Thanks, Ashley

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, Is she toy motivated? If she likes to play tug or fetch, use that for your reward instead of food. Right now she needs to be taken potty on a leash in your yard. I know that seems annoying considering you have a yard but its the best way to teach her until she learns to go quickly on her own. Take her potty in the yard on a six or eight foot leash. Tell her to "Go Potty" and slowly walk her around in your yard, encouraging her to sniff. Keep her focused and not playing using the leash to redirect her away from distractions. When she finally goes potty, praise her enthusiastically and take off the leash. Have a ball or toy ready and play a quick game with her. Eventually just freedom to run around can be used as a reward but you need something more specific at first - like a few ball throws or tug games (it doesn't have to be long play sessions - just five minutes, but it can be longer). Play is a reward for "Go Potty" - teaching her what Go Potty means and motivating her to go potty FIRST to earn play second. You will likely need to take her potty this way for 2-4 months to really cement pottying quickly outside - dogs are very habitual so it needs to be long enough for it to become a long-term habit. After that, take her off leash but still go with her until she does well with that too, then add distance between you and her, so that you are staying closer to the house door and you are sending her out to go potty on her own, but you are still there to tell her to "Go Potty", reward and praise afterward, and make sure she actually went. Finally, tell her to "Go Potty" from when you let her out the door, watch her through the window to make sure she goes, and go outside and redirect her or clip on a leash if you see she is getting distracted - the consistency of going outside to redirect her should teach her to stay focused on the task even when you aren't there. After she goes potty, she can play or come back inside and be praised - depending on what she wants to do and what your schedule allows. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harli
Terrier chihuahua
2 Years
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Harli
Terrier chihuahua
2 Years

I adopted Harli 3 months ago. I took her home and we got ourselves on a regular potty schedule. We go out every 4 hours during the day and we sit in the backyard with her on a very long 50-foot line and she goes potty. In two months she only had two poops inside and those are on days where I was gone an extendedtime I have now moved into a much smaller home and I have a dog door with a 4-foot by about 15 ft dog run for her to go out and potty outside the back. Then we frequently go out in the front and play. She will go pee in either the front area or the back through the dog door but she will only poop in the house. I can sit outside with her for up to two hours and we will then come in the house and I will put her leash away and she will poop inside. What am I doing wrong?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Becky, First, many dogs will feel the urge to poop when they walk or run around. Scent can also trigger the urge. What material is in the kennel run floor. If it's concrete or a synthetic material pup might not be associating it with pottying. If the kennel run is too small she may not be moving around enough to get things going. While playing with you in the front yard, despite it being a natural material I am assuming and moving around, pup is probably too distracted to go potty because of the play. I suggest crate training pup. Whenever pup hasn't pottied outside and may need to, confine pup to a crate. After an hour try taking pup back outside to go potty. Every time you take pup outside, walk her around on a leash (even in the kennel at this stage) so that the movement will encourage her to go. Tell her to "Go Potty" and if she pees, give one treat. If she poops give several small treats (you can also use her dog food for treats if she likes her food). If the kennel run is concrete or something synthetic, you may need to place a piece of grass sod or a few real grass pads on top in there while first training. Spraying a potty encouraging spray on the area right before you take her potty can also help. If she doesn't go potty, return her to the crate and try again later. Repeat doing that after every potty trip until she finally goes potty. Once she goes potty she can have more freedom until it's the time of day when she may need to poop again. Pay attention to what times of the day she usually goes. Many dogs will need to poop after breakfast and after dinner, meaning if she poops in the morning she may be fine until late afternoon. To introduce the crate, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Also, be sure to clean up any accidents new and old (that you can remember) with a cleaner that contains enzymes - only enzymes will remove the smell fully and any remaining smell will encourage up to go potty in that spot again later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chole
Chichuhua
5 Years
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Chole
Chichuhua
5 Years

I am gone for 8hrs during the weekdays. How can I train her to use pee pads until I get home? She was in a shelter for 3months. She has separation anxiety and doesn't do well in rooms or kennels without a way out of them. I strongly suspect her former owners did not treat her well and that is why she goes ballistic when cofined in a room or a pet taxi carrier. Any suggestions to try to help her when she is comfined. She does try to bite when put into it even though she will voluntarily go inside and she is possessive of the chew toy and chew bone she has hidden in it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Henry, For the pad training, I suggest using the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. That will still involve some confinement but less than a crate would. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy To help her get used to the exercise pen, check out the surprise method from the article linked below. That method was written for crate training but the principles can be used for an exercise pen also. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Oliver
Rottweiler
6 Years
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Oliver
Rottweiler
6 Years

We have just rescued a 6 year old rotti who spent his whole life in a tiny run area where he pooped and peed. We take both our dogs on 2 walks a day out in the woods so they can poop outside of the yard. We have had Oliver for about three weeks and we have had limited success with him pooping outside of the yard. When he does poop on a walk we give him lots of praise and you can tell he is so proud of himself. When he poops in the backyard we just clean it up quickly so it doesn't encourage him to do it again. Do you have any tips or tricks that will help us in this process of eliminating all poop from the backyard? We are very routine walkers and all our others dogs were trained very quickly in this area. This is the oldest dog that we have ever rescued though.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tricia, Honestly, you probably need to avoid letting pup hang out in the yard for a couple of months while taking pups on a walk to go potty. Tell pup to "Go Potty" when you take him, praise and reward with five small treats (or pieces of dog food is he likes that), one treat at a time, when he does go potty on the walk. If you continue letting him into your yard and also asking him to potty while on walks, he may get comfortable pottying on walks also, but he won't stop pooping in the yard as his preferred place until you stop that habit by limiting access to the yard while at the same time rewarding him for potty during the walk. Once pup is doing well pottying on the walk, in the future you will need to take him for a walk to potty before letting him into your yard for a few more months - to ensure pottying on the walk becomes the new habit - at this point he can be back in the yard again though, just take him potty first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ozo
German Shepherd
1 Month
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Ozo
German Shepherd
1 Month

I don't know how to teach my dog to poop in one place

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this guide has several excellent tips and steps to follow for teaching your dog to poop in one place in the yard. I won't recommend one in particular because you will determine which one suits you. https://wagwalking.com/training/poop-in-one-place/. As you train Ozo to go in one place, keep the area clean - don't allow the poop to remain there because dogs often do not want to go potty in a dirty spot. At first, you can leave a bit there so Ozo has the scent for direction, but then keep it clean. You can buy a spray from the pet supply store to encourage Ozo to poop in that spot and always take him there on the leash. But read the guide I suggested, so that you have instructions. Good luck!

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Chin Chow
toy poodle
6 Months
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Chin Chow
toy poodle
6 Months

Hi so we recently adopted our puppy from a friend and we need to train her to poop outside. It seems that she doesn’t like water as she refuses to go on the grass when it’s wet, resulting in her pooping in our house instead of outside. She keeps peeing and pooping inside our house because it’s the rainy season. How do I solve this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nia, Honestly, the solution to this is a bit of stubbornness on your part. You want to teach her that the quickest way to get back inside and away from the wetness is to poop quicker - not avoid it. To teach this, you need to walk pup around in the grass for even longer on leash. Each time you take her potty in general (when not wet also), tell her to "Go Potty" and give a treat after she goes - especially when she poops. She will learn what "Go Potty" means, then you can use that command the next time its wet to communicate to her what to do. Walk her around and tell her to "Go potty". It will take her a bit to go at first in the wet grass - be patient and keep walking her around slowly - the movement will naturally encourage her to poop. Tell her to "Go Potty" while you walk her. If she finally goes, praise, give a treat if she wants it, then quickly go back inside with her - going inside is the main reward for finally pooping - the best way to avoid the wet is to go quicker, not hold it - is what you want her to learn. If you absolutely cannot get her to poop outside, bring her inside, carry her to a crate and put her inside for 30 minutes. After thirty minutes, take her back outside on a leash to try again. Repeat the outside trips and crating until she finally goes - then she gets to come back inside. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Artymis
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
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Artymis
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

I have a grass patch in the apartment for my dog to go pee and poop and she does but she still finds random spots to go pee and poop in the apartment

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Adorable! Artymis is learning but has a ways to go. I would set up an exercise pen area for the times when you cannot keep a complete eye on her. See the litter box guide here (you will sub the grass pad for the litter)https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Exercise Pen Method. The grass pad is an excellent idea, to help her transfer to peeing outside when you are ready. Clean up all accidents with an enzymatic cleaner so that the smell is gone completely. You may not notice the odor but she does. This is a good training guide, too: The Timing Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside and as well, the Crate Method. All the best!

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Wanda
Chiweenie
3 Months
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Wanda
Chiweenie
3 Months

Hi, I have received a dog as a gift from my teacher which I love very much. During her first few days, I noticed she keeps pooping and peeing in her cage (which she never used as a cage or sleeping place as she always want to be beside me), and every morning I will place her there and she will poop and pee immediately. But after a few days she stopped doing that and just started pooping and peeing wherever in the house which makes my family frustrated. I began using diapers on her during the night as she sleeps beside me. I really do not want to keep her in diapers and train her to poop and pee at the same spot. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lorvy, If she is no longer going potty in the crate, then check out the crate training article linked below and follow that strictly. Pay attention to the times. One of the issues could be that pup isn't being taken potty often enough. The maximum amount of time a pup can hold their bladder for is the number of months they are in age plus one - meaning no longer than 4 hours right now during the day. When you are home, for potty training to be effective a puppy should be taken out twice that often though - so every 2 hours or sooner at this age. Pup can only hold it for 4 when absolutely necessary and while in a crate - if pup is motivated to hold it in the crate again. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If she is still going potty in the crate even after cleaning it well with a cleaner that contains enzymes, making sure it's sized correctly per the article linked above's directions, and remove everything absorbent from the crate (including a soft bed or towel - that will encourage pottying in the crate. You can use something like www.primopads.com in the crate instead)...If she is still having accidents in the crate despite addressing those things, you won't be able to crate train for potty training right now. Instead, check out the Tethering method from the article I have linked above. Follow that method whenever you are home during the day. At night and when you are gone off, have an exercise pen set up in an area where you can close it off later on (because pup will learn to go potty in that room so you don't want that later). Choose an area without carpet or rugs such as a guest bathroom, laundry room with the washer and dryer NOT running, guest bedroom with hard floors, ect... Set up the exercise pen in there and place a disposable real grass pad on one end and a non-absorbent bed such as www.primopads.com or a cot type bed on the other far end of the exercise pen. Check out the article linked below and follow the tips in the Exercise Pen method for teaching pup to go potty on the grass pad. The difference between what you will do and what the article specifies is that since your goal is outside potty training, you won't phase out the exercise pen and continue the grass pad without it (ignore that part of the article). Once pup is potty trained while in the rest of the house and can hold their bladder for as long as you have to be away for during the day and overnight, you will simply close off access to the exercise pen room and remove the exercise pen and pad completely, so that pup is only going potty outside and holding it while inside at all other times. If pup can be crate trained, that will be a much quicker route in the end though so I suggest going that route if it's an option. Be firm, it will pay off with years of benefits and more freedom for pup as an adult. Giving too much freedom too young is what leads to dogs who have to be crated forever. A few months of being strict and careful with a schedule can prevent everything from potty training issues, destructive chewing habits, separation anxiety (it teaches pup to cope with being alone while young), easier travel, easier boarding, ect.. All of this means pup can't sleep with you in the bed at night. There is no successful way for pup to be potty trained doing that right now. She either needs to sleep in the crate or in the exercise pen with access to the grass pad. As soon as you begin tethering and exercise pen or crating with pup, stop using the diapers completely and don't use them anymore. They are a good way to keep things clean when you don't have another option (like with an old dog with urinary incontinence who can't help it), but they do not teach pup to hold their bladder until they are in the right location - pup just continues going potty wherever she is at, so the longer you use the diapers or allow her to have lots of accidents in the house, the harder potty training will be in the future. Don't feel bad for using them so far. You did what you needed to, just make sure they don't hinder your efforts going forward now. Exercise Pen method - this article mentions litter box training but the same steps can be used with a disposable real grass pad. When choosing a grass pad, use the real grass kind, not Astroturf if your goal is outside potty training ultimately. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - also found on amazon.com www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com - this one is more expensive. I only recommend it if you plan to use long term. I know this stage of puppyhood is a lot of work. Stick with the work and it generally does pay off and get easier eventually if you put in the work. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tokyo
Bichon Yorkie
6 Months
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Tokyo
Bichon Yorkie
6 Months

I have a dog. She turning 6 months. She toilet trained already but few weeks ago she started peeing at the edge of her puppy pad. i tried to put het at our balcony but it did not work. There's just a lot of distraction for her. She is an indoor dog so I would prefer if she does her business inside the house. We tried the faux grass but it did not work as well.. What should I do.. Thank you so much for your help on this!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. I am sure the peeing at the edge of the pad can be remedied. Do you keep the pads in the same place all of the time? Where she has missed the pad will now have an odor so be sure to clean that spot with an enzymatic spray that will fully remove the smell. You can purchase this at a pet supply store. While there, look for a pee training spray that can be sprayed on the pads to encourage Tokyo to pee there. These guides also have great tips (the litter box guide can be used with pee pads also): https://wagwalking.com/training/use-a-pee-pad-2 and https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. Do make sure that Tokyo gets outside often for walks and mental stimulation; if she gets used to peeing on the grass outside, she may learn to use a grass litter box that could be kept on the balcony (you could try the pee spray there, too.) Good luck!

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Jimmy
Patterdale
6 Years
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Jimmy
Patterdale
6 Years

We've had Jim for 5 years and he has never pooped in the garden. He's house trained and will go for a wee in the garden but he has to go for a walk to poo. This isn't usually a problem as were an active family and he gets out at least twice a day for a walk but if the weather is horrible or on the odd occassion he needs a bowel move in the middle of the night we have to take him for a walk. Can we now train him to do his business in a spot in the garden when it's not convenient to take him on a hike?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Jim is a handsome boy! I think you should be able to train him to poop in the garden. I like The Designated Area Method described in this guide; I think that it's important to watch his scheduled time and try to take him to the new area when you know it's about time for him to go. This guide has great suggestions, too: https://wagwalking.com/training/poop-in-one-place. I suggest buying a potty training spray that will encourage your dog to eliminate when he smells it. The product can be purchased at a pet supply store, Ask the staff if there is one they recommend and give it a try. Spray the area right before you take Jim out so that the scent is fresh. Work on this training when you will be home for a few days so that you can work at it consistently. This is also an excellent guide that may help: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Good luck and be firm but kind as you encourage the change.

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Zion
Pomeranian
5 Years
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Zion
Pomeranian
5 Years

What if he refuses to poop in the area that I want him to poop. I’ve been trying to teach him to poop in the toilet.It’s been whole day I confined him in that area so that he will poop there but he refuses to poop whole day and I’m not sure to either put him out or not. Cuz if I put him out I’m sure he’s going to poop in my living room again.. he made my living room a toilet. Help me. It’s sad to see him in that small place And I wanted to let him out, but I know if I let him out before he could eliminate won’t help solve the problem.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about cute little Zion. How does Zion make out when he is out on walks? Does he poop when on a walk? Try using a grass litter box. He may associate this with pooping and peeing on the grass when out on walks. You can also try using a spray that encourages elimination. You can buy it at the same place as the litter. There are great tips here for litter box training: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. The article has very good tips, so please read the entire thing. I suggest trying the Exercise Pen Method; give Zion toys and a cushy spot to rest while in his special area so that he does not feel punished. Being in the bathroom with nothing to do as he is now, he may feel like he is on a time out for using the living room - and will be anxious so may not do anything. Keep your attitude positive and be sure to praise him highly when he poops. Clean the other areas of your house with enzymatic cleaner; it is the only thing that will remove the odor from previous accidents. You can also try taking him outside extra often to help him get the idea that outside is a good place to poop. All the best!

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Booster
mixed terrier
5 Years
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Booster
mixed terrier
5 Years

Hi Caitlin, hope you can help us. We adopted Booster last November. He is incredibly well-trained to eliminate outside only, and during walks (2x a day, about 30 mins each). We'd like advise on how to train him to go potty indoors instead, while we are all required to stay at home due to the Coronavirus. We want to train him now as we have been feeling unwell and are preparing in case this escalates and we are physically unable to go outside.

We've begun to shorten his walks to 15 mins. We praise him each time with 'good boy, good potty'. One day though, he was unable to eliminate, and the following morning he vomitted rather violently. Looking to your expertise on how to handle this! Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Trina, Check out the exercise pen method from the article linked below. Instead of using a litter box I suggest using a disposable real grass pad to more closely mimic being outside. Set up the exercise pen in an area without carpet or rugs under it. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - also can be purchased on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Use the same good potty command while they are in the exercise pen, and give treats after they go if they go potty on the grass pad. If you have a balcony or patio, try doing this method out there first - to get them used to the concept but make them feel like they are more outside. Once the are doing well on the balcony or patio consistently, move the exercise pen inside and continue. I also suggest purchasing a potty encouraging spray that you can spray on the grass pad right before you take them potty there - to help the process along as much as possible. if you aren't having luck with the above methods (which is generally the quicker route, you can also place the grass pad outside near a grassy area but on concrete and walk pup over the grass pad slowly for several minutes (circling around), encouraging pup to sniff and "good potty". Give treats when pups go potty on the grass pad while its outside also, and continue giving treats for going after you bring it inside once pups are used to going on it there. If you are coming down with something now and do not have time to transition pup by using a balcony or outside first, Simply place pups in exercise pens (or one big one, but make sure it's not too small if they are together or that will discourage pottying in there) and give treats whenever they go potty on the grass pads; going this route, unfortunately you may have some periods where they hold it long the first couple of days and do get sick for a couple of days (hopefully not though), but this is likely the quickest way to teach indoor potty training and given that you may not have much time to teach, your best option. Once they go potty on the grass pad a couple of times and are rewarded for doing so, they should begin going on the pads more easily gradually. If you place a bed on the other end of the exercise pen (away from the grass pad), use a non-absorbent bed like www.primopads.com or a coty type bed, or cover their normal beds with something waterproof to discourage peeing there instead of the grass. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Monet
Maltese
1 Month
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Monet
Maltese
1 Month

Hello! My mini maltese is 2 months old and i have had him for 3 days. We live in an apartment, so i can't take him outside for eliminating. I use pee pads and i take him there after waking up, playing and eating. He has no problem with peeing, but for pooping he goes alone somewhere and does it there. I know that it is early yet, but i would really like some advice about pee pad training.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Miriam, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the Exercise Pen method for training. If you plan to teach pup to go potty exclusively outside once older, I highly suggest switching from pee pads to disposable real grass pads to make the outside transition later less confusing for pup. I also suggest placing the exercise pen in an area of your home that you can close off later when pup is older and ready to begin outside potty training - so that pup doesn't continue having accidents where the pad used to be once it is removed and outside potty training taught. If you plan to continue pads permanently, you can follow the exercise pen method as is. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - use real grass pads, not astroturf if you plan to transition to outside later: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI When puppy is older and you are ready to teach outside pottying (if you don't plan to use pads permanently that is), I suggest using the Crate training method from this article linked below and removing all pads at that point. As a general rule, a puppy can hold their bladder during the day for a maximum of how many months they are in age plus one - meaning a 3 month old pup can hold it no more than 4 hours, a 4 month old puppy 5 hours, a 6 month old puppy 7 hours, until you reach the 8 hour max for an adult dog (Those numbers are maximums - take puppy potty twice that often when home). Crate training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Steeer
English Bulldog
8 Weeks
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Steeer
English Bulldog
8 Weeks

Hello we just got our puppy and our back yard is split with Turf and cement however we also have a pool, so my husband doesn’t like the idea of the puppy pooping on the cement especially when we will be barefoot outside and he doesn’t want him to go potty on our turf either. We only have grass out front. Do you recommend we just take him out front or do you recommend to put a patch of artificial grass in a certain area on the cement? My only concern with that is, will he then think it’s okay to go potty on the rest of the turf area? Also, do you recommend taking it to the potty in the middle of the night ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mayra, Teaching pup to go potty in the front yard only will be simplest training wise. You can certainly teach pup to potty in only one area in the backyard though - just expect that pup will need to be taken to that location on a leash each time for a full year to create a solid-long term habit of only pottying in that spot and not in others. It will be location-based training instead of based on the surface pup is going on. At 8 weeks of age a pup will definitely need to go potty 1-2 times during the night for the next 2-3 months. I suggest crating pup at night, and either having pup somewhere you can hear them or setting up an audio baby monitor to listen out for them. When they wake and cry to go outside, take them out then. Some puppies have to be woken up to go, but most will ask to go if the crate is setup properly - the correct size and without absorbent material in it. Taking pup when they ask to go will help pup learn to sleep through the night soonest generally, since pup's bladder will be what's waking them and as their bladder capacity increases with age, they should learn to also sleep longer, so long as potty trips are kept calm and boring, pup is crate trained, and no food is given at night. After pup goes potty, immediately return pup to the crate to go back to sleep and ignore any crying - that should help them learn to settle sooner after 2-14 days (most pups learn in 3 days but up to two weeks adjusting is still normal). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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robin
Jack Russell Terrier
5 Years
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robin
Jack Russell Terrier
5 Years

Ive been working on trying to get my dog to go pee and poo on a tray in my closet and he keeps on peeing on carpet which is getting awful Ive used special enzyme cleaner and a spray to discourage not to go on carpet near tray but he still does it Ive used pee attractant on tray to also encourage but no luck?? what am I not doing??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cara, Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. The carpet is an absorbent surface - which most dogs prefer to keep themselves cleaner. The tray is not a very natural surface for a dog to go potty on - so it needs to be pup's only potty option at first. You will either need to initially move the training to an area without carpeting - using the exercise pen method so that pup can't just wander off to choose an absorbent surface. OR switch to a more absorbent potty surface if you are still struggling with the training - such as a disposable real grass pad and combine that with crate training or the exercise pen method (both found in the same article I have linked below this message). OR teach a litter box and combine that with the exercise pen method or crate training method. I don't suggest teaching a pee pad though - since many dogs confuse those with carpet and rugs and you are already having that issue. Be sure to clean all old and new accidents up with a cleaner that contains enzymes. Only enzymes will completely remove the smell to the level needed for a dog - even bleach won't, and a dog is attracted to a potty spot by smell. Exercise Pen method and Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad brands - most are also found on Amazon.com: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Weeks
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Lucy
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Weeks

We got Lucy 3 weeks ago. We have a designated spot in rocks for her to do her business. Overall she does pretty good with cueing at the door when she needs to go out. She will have a day To two with no accidents in the house then today she pooped twice in the house. Once after I had just taken her outside and the second time hind sight says she was sniffing but went to the next room and pooped didn’t even go to the door like she usually does. Is this just normal puppy training behaviour? Also how many times in the night should we expect to take her out at this age? It seems like we are consistent at twice but I feel like I am waking her to take her out about 4 hours after the last time I take her out at bedtime. She’s never had a accident in her crate which is where she sleeps at night.

Thanks Jen

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jen, First, pup likely needs more supervision and management with a strict potty training schedule at this age. Don't expect her to be able to alert you when she needs to go yet - she is actually ahead of the game to be doing that at all. Typically that behavior comes closer to 6 months, if the dog was potty trained well during the first couple of months - potty training at this age means that the dog will hold it between scheduled potty trips that you initiate, so be vigilant to take her out every two hours still (or sooner if accidents are happening sooner). The more accidents you can prevent through careful management, the sooner potty training actually happens. At night, it will vary at this age. Typically 1-2 potty trips is normal still. At this point, crate pup at night (as you are) and either have her crate somewhere where you can hear her when she wakes and cries to go out, or set up an audio baby monitor to listen out for her. Wait until she wakes up and cries to go potty - in a crate puppies will typically ask to be let out at night when they wake to pee (but only expect that while they are crated). If you are a heavy sleeper and don't wake up when pup cries, then you will have to set an alarm instead. Keep night potty trips super boring - on the leash, no treats, no play, not a lot of talk, then straight back to bed. If trips are kept boring and you are giving them the opportunity to sleep past their normal wake up times the nights when they don't have to go, then as pup's bladder capacity increases, they should naturally begin to wake less at night to go out. Once awake, they will have to go potty sooner than if they had stayed asleep though - the bladder functions differently while asleep versus awake. Be encouraged that it sounds like it is going well overall though - just don't expect alerting too soon or that might set you back. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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JC
Malti-Poo
1 Year
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JC
Malti-Poo
1 Year

My dog from a rescue would only potty (pee & poo) during walks but not at our backyard. We've had him for a month now.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Herminia, Start by telling pup to "Go Potty" right before they go potty while on the walk. After they go, give a treat. Do this to teach pup the Go Potty command. Practice this for a few days until pup seems to go more quickly when told to go. After pup knows the command, take pup potty in your yard on a leash. Walk pup around the yard slowly, telling pup to "Go Potty". Do this for up to 15 minutes, keeping pup moving and encouraging sniffing. The movement and sniffing will help pup feel the urge to go. You can also place one of pup's poops, or spray a potty encouraging spray on the area right before taking pup out, where you want pup to go, so that the smell will also help trigger pup to go. Only one poop though - too dirty and that will discourage it. If pup doesn't go potty within 15 minutes, bring pup back inside and crate for one hour. After the hour (or less if pup acts like they need to go potty), take pup back outside to the yard and repeat the same potty trip in the yard on leash. Repeat taking pup outside every hour, and crating between trips if pup doesn't go, until pup finally goes potty when you take them. When they do finally go, praise genuinely and give five treats or pieces of dog food - one piece at a time to make it more exciting. The first couple of days that you do this pup may hold it for as long as 10 hours before finally going. Try to stay patient and consistent. After pup goes potty in the yard the first few times and is rewarded for it and praised for it, they should begin going more quickly. Don't take pup for a walk until AFTER they go potty in the yard. The walk is a reward for going potty in the yard, not something pup holds out going potty waiting for. This may mean pup doesn't go for a walk for a couple of days - try to stay consistent about pup having to go potty in the yard before starting a walk each time - then the walk will actually become something that motivates pup to go faster in the yard - so they can start the walk; instead of something pup holds their bladder until, waiting to go on one. The easiest time to start this will likely be when you have 1-2 days off work, to be able to take pup potty frequently at first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bentley
Pomeranian
7 Weeks
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Bentley
Pomeranian
7 Weeks

I have a 7 week old Pomeranian and I am trying to potty train with the pads in a designated area. He doesn’t pee or poop on the pads. Instead he lays and plays on the pad. We take him to the pad after eating and drinking water and/or when he is sniffing in one spot as if he wants to “go”. Also, we recently realize that he has an area in our home that he poops at more frequently than other areas. My question is, is he too young to potty train or are we doing something wrong?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laura, It sounds like you are giving pup too much freedom too soon. Check out the article linked below. Start by following the Crate Training method - which will only give him freedom in your home after he has gone potty on the pad and require you to bring him to the pad each time at first. When he doesn't go, you will crate for a bit, then try taking him again - thus limiting his freedom to only times when you know his bladder and bowels are empty. Once pup is going potty well on the pads using the crate training method, you can switch to the exercise pen method, found in that same article. You can certainly continue with the Crate Training method indefinitely, but the Exercise Pen method tends to be a lot less work for the people involved - so switching to that once pup understands to go on the pad instead of next to it, is an option. Start with the crate training method first though because pup needs to be taken directly to the pad to learn how to go on the pad instead of just next to it. Crate Training and Exercise Pen methods - the method mentions litter box training. The method can be used with a doggie litter box, pee pads, or disposable grass pads. If you plan to transition pup to pottying outside later, I suggest grass pads instead of pee pads to avoid potential carpet confusion. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Memphis
German Shepherd
4 Months
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Memphis
German Shepherd
4 Months

Hi! I have a 4 month old german shepard that is pretty smart.ive only had him for a week and ive been trying to train himto be an outside dog, sit, laydown, and jump up. Im currently have Trouble potty training him. He pees randomly anywhere and poops in corners of the yard. We feed him then walk him then place him in the designated area but i feel like he thinks im punishing him and he holds it. I can't tell when he's goingto poop or not. I leave him in the area for a while and he tries to get out or fallsasleep. Please help with tips

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danielle, Is pup primarily an inside or outside dog? If pup is an inside dog primarily and you are saying that you are trying to teach pup to go potty outside, I suggest using the Crate Training method from the article linked below, and every time you take pup potty, take pup to the same designated spot in the yard on leash. This will need to be done on leash for several months before pup will begin to prefer that spot on their own without you taking them on leash. When pup doesn't go potty in that spot within 15 minutes, the article will detail how to bring pup back inside, crate for a bit, then try again, and repeat the potty trips and crating when pup doesn't go, until pup finally goes - then you will reward with treats. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup is primarily an outside dog, it will be extremely difficult to teach pup to go in a designated area because that requires supervision and limiting pup's access to the yard at times when their bladder isn't completely empty. Having pup stay in a small part of the yard and rewarding pup when you do catch them pottying there, and doing that for several months before expanding to the full yard access, can sometimes work, but not always. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Golden Retriever
20 Months
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Daisy
Golden Retriever
20 Months

We have been taking her to her potty spot for 4 days, and so far has only pooped three times, when usually it’s twice a day. She only has peed maybe once a day, but we feel she should be going more. She has had one accident in the house while we were at work, and so we have blocked her into a more confined area when we are not home. We have not taken her for her walks as of yet, as when she does go to the bathroom it has been at bedtime. How long would you say the training hurdle would be? Is there something more we can do? We have been leaving one pile of poo in the pen, and she goes right in, just isn’t using it the way we hope. In addition we have just adopter her 3 months ago.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tim, I would normally expect it to take pup a couple of weeks to adjust, with the first week being the hardest, it taking even up to 4 weeks for things to be completely smooth is less common but still in the realm of normal; however, scent, movement, space, and pup knowing that going potty in a certain area is acceptable all effect how readily a dog will go potty. A lot of it will just be consistency and giving it time. You have already added the scent - just make sure it's not multiple poops, because a dirty area will actually discourage pottying, just one poop is normally enough. Try walking pup around and across the area slowly on a leash to add movement. Even though the space you are walking in is very small, keeping pup moving in circles and lines slowly in that area, and encouraging sniffing, will help pup's digestive system feel the need to go - that's one reason pups tend to go more easily during walks - the smells AND movement trigger it, especially with pooping. Pup doesn't need to walk far though, just move. If the space you are taking pup to is too small that can also discourage going potty in it. Pup will typically need an area at least 4 times their size to go in. If your area is very small, making it larger at least temporarily, may help. Each time you take pup potty, tell pup to "Go Potty", then after they go, give three small treats or pieces of kibble, one piece at a time (so it seems like 3 separate treats, not one big one). Keep a bowl or baggie of treats next to the door you take pup out through to make this convenient and help you remember. Telling pup to "Go Potty" and giving the treats will help pup learn that command, and trigger them to go potty when they hear it once it's learned. The rewards will help them learn the command but will also motivate them to go quicker, and let them know that the area you are taking them to potty in is and acceptable place to go in. Keep the treats hidden behind your back or in a pocket while walking pup around so that pup doesn't just stare at the treats the whole time you are out there. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jake
Labrador Retriever
1 Month
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Jake
Labrador Retriever
1 Month

We have kept our hall's bathroom as his designated spot but we have to physically take him there everytime he bends to pee or poop.How to make him automatically go there.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Honestly, at four weeks of age pup will likely still need to be taken there or kept in that area in order to remember, until pup is a little older. Pup simply doesn't have much control over when they go at 4 weeks of age. Check out the exercise pen method from the article linked below. As pup approaches 8 weeks, they will be more ready to start learning all of this. Until then, go ahead and start laying a good foundation through careful management and taking pup there or having pup stay in the bed by the potty when you can closely supervise. To pave the way for outside potty training, I would also recommend using a disposable real grass pad above using a pee pad or litter box. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable grass pad brands - amazon also: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com When pup is close to 8 weeks of age, I also recommend beginning the crate training or tethering methods (or a combination) for outside potty training as well. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside You can start getting pup familiar with the concept of the crate now too though. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below for ways to introduce a crate gradually - pup likely won't be able to physically hold it well enough for true crate training for potty training yet at 4 weeks, but it will make outside potty training and crate training later easier, if you introduce the crate as a fun place right now. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Grizzly
Shorkie
16 Weeks
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Grizzly
Shorkie
16 Weeks

My new pup will pee on his wee wee pads but won’t poop there unless I catch him in the act and place him there. How do I get him to poop on the training pads? Being a whooping 2 lbs, he will most likely use the wee wee pad 90% of the time since he has to use the bathroom much more frequently than a larger dog

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question and the picture. Grizzly is an adorable munchkin! You have half of the battle won and that is the pee. Good for you. The poop may take a little longer but it is great that you catch him in the act occasionally and put him on the pads. He will eventually get the idea. Make sure the pee pad is not heavily soiled - he may not like to poop on a wet pad. You can also try a litter box with natural grass; that way he can transition outside to do his business if you choose to make the switch. Take a look here:https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy The exercise pen method may do the trick. Good luck and have fun with Grizzly!

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Hank
French Bulldog
12 Weeks
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Hank
French Bulldog
12 Weeks

Hello, we have a 'fresh patch' of grass on our terrace and our puppy knows to pee there. However, he loves to poop ANYWHERE else on the terrace. After he has peed, he walks off the grass. Occasionally he has walked back on to the grass right afterwards to poop, but when he doesn't need to, he starts to hang out on the terrace, and when he finds a cozy spot under a chair or behind a planter, starts to try to poop. We quickly pick him up and move him to the grass when we see him start to poop, but what can we do to get him to ALWAYS poop on the grass instead of elsewhere on the terrace? We have been doing this for so long and can't figure out why he wants to poop elsewhere and won't poop consistently on the grass!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Some dogs don't like an audience and that may be why he is moving behind the planter or under the chair. Can you block off access to behind the planter or under the chair as a temporary measure? I suggest buying an encouragement spray called "Hurry Up" or "Go Here" and make sure that you spray the grass before you all go out on the terrace. Hopefully it will encourage Hank to poop there as well as pee. When he does, give him a few treats and lots of verbal praise every time. (Even when it is just pee, because he may poop there, too, knowing a treat is on the way.) If the spray and blocking access to other areas does not work, you can try the Exercise Pen Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. Or, you may have to crate train him. Take a look at the Crate Training Method here:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Good luck and enjoy little Hank!

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Tokyo
Labrador Retriever
1 Month
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Tokyo
Labrador Retriever
1 Month

How do I train 35 day old puppy to pee and poo on one spot?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Tokyo is adorable! I assume the potty training is going well and you are looking to have Tokyo do his business in one spot in the yard. The Signs and Times Method here may do the trick:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-husky-where-to-poop. The Fence it Off Method here may help https://wagwalking.com/training/poop-in-one-place. You can spray the area with a puppy potty encouraging spray before you take Tokyo outside. Make sure the area is kept clean of poop, otherwise he may not want to go there. However, sometimes leaving a bit there for a day or two allows Tokyo to smell the scent and poop in the same place. Take a look at these methods, and have fun training!

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Gracie
Mixed terrier ans shih tzu
3 Years
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Gracie
Mixed terrier ans shih tzu
3 Years

Trying to train her to go potty in one spot outside and too not take all day about it.

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Pola
Great Pyrenees
12 Weeks
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Pola
Great Pyrenees
12 Weeks

Pola joined the family 2 days ago we are potty/crate training as I found on this website. We are seeing small steps a. My concern/ question is often she dose not want to walk and will just lay as we bring her in and out of the yard. After she poopt on the way in and on the way out. We don't want to pull forcefully. Should we pick her up in and out?. We have a big yard when we let her of the harness she will run around but as soon as she is on the leash she will just stop

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. I am actually going to send you information on leash training, as it sounds like she needs to become comfortable on leash. The advice you are reading about potty training on here is great. So I will just bypass the potty training information, and get into leash training. The first step in training your new pup is to introduce them to the collar and leash. You should try to make your pup enjoy being on the leash by using positive reinforcement when they’re on it. Treats work great as a tool for positive reinforcement. Once your puppy has gotten used to wearing a collar and leash you should start by practicing walking indoors. Hold a treat out and walk backward while you have your puppy follow you on his leash. After you feel he’s comfortable with this you can move things outdoors. It’s best to keep the first few walks shorter to get the dog used to walking on a leash outside. Feel free to bring your treats with and make sure to get ahead of any problems he might cause by distracting him from lunging or pulling on the leash with a treat, or rewarding him for good behavior with one. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Fluffy
Chihuahua
2 Years
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Fluffy
Chihuahua
2 Years

Hello, I have a question. My friends they have a Dog and they are trying to teach him where to poop exactly. The cage him for almost entire day and they only take him outside his cage with a leash to the washroom and thats it. They will reward him if he poops there but again they will put him in the cage. He’s been in the cage for about 5 days and gets out for the washroom twice a day. Is it a proper way? Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amir, Is pup only being let out 2 times in 24 hours, or 2 times during 8 hours? While at work, unfortunately many dogs do need to be crated most of the day during the 8 hours someone cannot enforce potty training, and at 2 years of age, 2 potty trips in 8 hours is acceptable; however, pup can be given more supervised freedom in the evening and morning outside of work time by keeping pup close to them using a hands-free leash when pup's owners are home. Pup should be given attention and mental and physical stimulation when people are home - so that they are emotionally, phyiscally, and mentally healthy overall, even though they will need to be crated when someone is not home. If pup is going longer than 8 hours between potty breaks (ideally pup would be given a potty break every 4 hours while learning) and not being given any interaction during 24 hours, other than brief trips outside twice a day, their needs are probably not being met. Below is generally what I recommend for potty training. Do to work schedules some things may need to be adjusted, but this is what I suggest pursuing in most cases. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 2.5- 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. If he hasn't gone poop yet during that half of the day, he needs to be tethered to you or returned to the crate, then taken back outside again in 30-45 minutes if you know he likely needs to go, less frequently if he likely doesn't need to poop. Pooping outside equals more freedom. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you are home you can follow the Tethering method found in the same potty training as the crate training method linked above, to allow pup a bit more supervised freedom out of the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zeke
Lab Dalmatian mix
2 Years
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Zeke
Lab Dalmatian mix
2 Years

Zeke is killing our grass with his urine. He still squats and this is second year we have replanted almost the entire lawn. We have a front yard with rocks that I would like him to urinate in but I can’t get him to go there. We not out back where I trained him. We already have spots on the section of the lawn we just replanted even after watering it down. Very frustrated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tami, First, I would consider adding a small dirt, mulch, or straw area to your front yard to train pup on, since some dogs find rocks unpleasant to go on because their paws tend to get wet, the pee splashes up, the rocks are often hot, and the surface is unpleasant to walk on. It's not impossible to train it, but adding another non-grass surface to an area you can take pup to that pup can go on will likely be the easiest solution. I suggest acting like pup isn't potty trained for a month and crate training, only taking pup potty to the front yard, telling pup to "Go Potty", walking them around slowly on the leash to encourage the need to go, then rewarding with seven small treats or pieces of kibble, one at time, when they do go, to help them learn "Go Potty" and motivate them in the future. Do this until pup will quickly go potty in the front yard where you want them to when you tell them Go Potty. You can also spray a potty encouraging spray onto the area right before you take them out. When pup doesn't go potty when you take him at 3 hours, return him to the crate calmly, wait an hour, then try again. Try again every hour until he finally goes and you can reward. Withhold time in the backyard or walks until after he has pottied in the front yard. This will take a lot of attempts most likely, the first day. You may want to begin on a weekend. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 2.5- 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home.

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Cid
Shiba Inu
10 Weeks
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Cid
Shiba Inu
10 Weeks

My puppy seems to be afraid of the grass where I prefer for him to go poop. He has no problems pooping or showing that he’s ready to poop if I walk him anywhere else, down the street. I first had him poop while walking because I was worried that he may have a problem. But now he prefers to poop on other lawns that aren’t my own.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leanne, It's not unusual for a dog to hold their poop and pee until they are out on a walk because the movement and smells help trigger the need to go, but also pup learns that that's a way they can get to go on a walk - and that's more fun. First, have the walk come after pottying in your yard - no potty in the yard, no walk yet. Go potty in the yard, reward with a treat and a little walk when there is time for a walk then. The walk becomes the reward instead of something pup wait to go potty to get. Second, check out the article linked below and follow the Crate Training method from the article linked below, or the Tethering method and Crate Training methods both. That method will have tips to help pup go potty - such as walking pup around slowly on a leash, using a potty encouraging spray, sprayed on the area right before taking pup to that spot, temporarily, teaching the "Go Potty" command and rewarding with a couple of treats after they go potty. Return pup to the crate after a potty trip if pup won't go to prevent an accident while pup's bladder is still full, then take pup outside again in about 40 minutes. Repeat this process until pup finally goes potty in the yard. If pup truly seems afraid of your yard, spend time simply hanging out in your yard with pup. Teach fun tricks with treats, read a book and hang out (being aware of shade and water needs if hot, for pup), and play fun games with pup. Do all of this for 30 minutes to an hour often to simply help pup feel confident in the yard, so they are no longer afraid and can relax enough to go potty there. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shy
Terrier mix
11 Weeks
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Shy
Terrier mix
11 Weeks

We adopted a puppy 2 weeks ago, she was crate trained but we want to train her to start pooping and peeing at a designated spot. She is having accidents including peeing inside her crate but peeing inside her crate was after her 2nd vaccine. Do we allow her to pee inside her wee wee pad still if we training her to go outside? How can we train her to stop peeing inside her crate? Thank you.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you a crash course in potty training. Some of this you may know, but it's always good to refresh and essentially start over once you start having issues, so those issues don't become habits. House-training your dog or puppy requires patience, commitment and lots of consistency. Accidents are part of the process, but if you follow these basic house-training guidelines, you can get the newest member of your family on the right track in a few weeks’ time. Establish a routine Like babies, puppies do best on a regular schedule. The schedule teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play and times to do their business. Generally speaking, a puppy can control their bladder one hour for every month of age. So if your puppy is two months old, they can hold it for about two hours. Don't go longer than this between bathroom breaks or they’re guaranteed to have an accident. Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot. While your puppy is relieving themselves, use a specific word or phrase that you can eventually use before they go to remind them what to do. Take them out for a longer walk or some playtime only after they have eliminated. As your puppy gets better at going outside, the same method can be applied to the potty pads. Reward your puppy every time they eliminate outdoors. Praise or give treats—but remember to do so immediately after they’ve finished, not after they come back inside. This step is vital, because rewarding your dog for going outdoors is the only way to teach what's expected of them. Before rewarding, be sure they’re finished. Puppies are easily distracted and if you praise too soon, they may forget to finish until they’re back in the house. Put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule. What goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. Depending on their age, puppies usually need to be fed three or four times a day. Feeding your puppy at the same times each day will make it more likely that they'll eliminate at consistent times as well, making housetraining easier for both of you. Pick up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime to reduce the likelihood that they'll need to relieve themselves during the night. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without needing a bathroom break. If your puppy does wake you up in the night, don't make a big deal of it; otherwise they will think it is time to play and won't want to go back to sleep. Turn on as few lights as possible, don't talk to or play with your puppy, take them out and then return them to bed. Supervise your puppy Don't give your puppy an opportunity to soil in the house; keep an eye on them whenever they’re indoors. Tether your puppy to you or a nearby piece of furniture with a six-foot leash if you are not actively training or playing. Watch for signs that your puppy needs to go out. Some signs are obvious, such as barking or scratching at the door, squatting, restlessness, sniffing around or circling. When you see these signs, immediately grab the leash and take them outside to their bathroom spot. If they eliminate, praise them and reward with a treat. Keep your puppy on leash in the yard. During the housetraining process, your yard should be treated like any other room in your house. Give your puppy some freedom in the house and yard only after they become reliably housetrained. When you can't supervise, confine When you're unable to watch your puppy at all times, restrict them to an area small enough that they won't want to eliminate there. The space should be just big enough to comfortably stand, lie down and turn around. You can use a portion of a bathroom or laundry room blocked off with baby gates. Or you may want to crate train your puppy. (Be sure to learn how to use a crate humanely as a method of confinement.) If your puppy has spent several hours in confinement, you'll need to take them directly to their bathroom spot as soon as you return. Mistakes happen Expect your puppy to have a few accidents in the house—it's a normal part of housetraining. Here's what to do when that happens: Interrupt your puppy when you catch them in the act. Make a startling noise (be careful not to scare them) or say "OUTSIDE!" and immediately take them to their bathroom spot. Praise your pup and give a treat if they finish there. Don't punish your puppy for eliminating in the house. If you find a soiled area, it's too late to administer a correction. Just clean it up. Rubbing your puppy's nose in it, taking them to the spot and scolding them or any other punishment will only make them afraid of you or afraid to eliminate in your presence. Punishment will often do more harm than good. Clean the soiled area thoroughly. Puppies are highly motivated to continue soiling in areas that smell like urine or feces. It's extremely important that you use these supervision and confinement procedures to minimize the number of accidents. If you allow your puppy to eliminate frequently in the house, they'll get confused about where they’re supposed to go, which will prolong the housetraining process.

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Rocket
Jack Russell/schauzer
2 Years
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Rocket
Jack Russell/schauzer
2 Years

Hello, I am trying to get my dog to poop in one area of the back yard, he goes everywhere and pees everywhere. How can I get him to poop in one area of the back yard?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would suggest using the Methods as described in the guide on the page where you submitted your question: https://wagwalking.com/training/poop-in-a-designated-area. In particular, the Leash Training Method may work. Allow Rocket an area of around 5 x 5 ft. He needs to be able to sniff, walk around a bit, and circle, if that is his habit. Keep leash training him until you are confident that he has learned where you want him to go. Alternatively, you set up a temporary exercise pen area and put Rocket in there (it has to be big enough that he can wander a bit). Stick close by so that when he pees or poops you can walk over to give praise and a treat. You can allow a little bit of poop to remain in the pen for a day or so, to remind him this is where to go. But do not let it accumulate, as Rocket will be turned off of the idea altogether. So, read the guide and choose a method - it will take time. Just keep trying and good luck!

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Remy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year
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Remy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year

I bought an outdoor cage, 5 by 10 as an area for them to poop in. With training, will they go poop here? It’s been a day, they all pooped once but usually they go 2 or 3 timeS. Want to know your opinion to see if I’m doing it wrong. Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! What a great idea. You can definitely train them to go in a specific area. A general guide as far as timelines when you are changing up a dogs routine is, it usually takes dogs about 30 days to become consistent in whatever you are training or re-training. So for now, continue to take them to their new potty area, and do not give them opportunities to potty elsewhere. Not even on a walk. They go potty in their spot before any walking. Start taking some treats out with you and praise the heck out of them after they go to the bathroom. Consistency and patience are key with this one. But they will get it!

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Luna
Pomsky
4 Years
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Luna
Pomsky
4 Years

Any tips on training multiple dogs in the household to eliminate on a designated area of the yard? Should they each have separate spaces? Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It is totally possible to train them each to have a designated space for eliminating. There are a few tricks to do this, and sometimes you have to just try until you find one that works for you. So I will try to keep it simple with my suggestions. The first place to start is to take them out on leash and keep them in that area until they go. Praise the heck out of them and reward them with treats. You are essentially starting over with potty training. You will want to do this until they are consistently going in that area. I have heard people having luck with utilizing visual markers in a specific area like small traffic cones. You can also leave their poo in that area for a few days so they get the hint also. But treats seem to be the best way to go!

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Jasmin
French Mastiff
1 Year
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Jasmin
French Mastiff
1 Year

She is 1yr and 6 months. We had her potty trained to one area. In our rock bed. It was easy to train her to to that potty Area. Our last massive that past away Would go in that spot. In the last 3 months she has changed her spot. She now goes in front of our bbq or in front of our back door steps. How do I get her to go back in the rock bed?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Sometimes dogs just need a refreshment. One weird experience (in your case it could be something as silly as a bug that spooked her) and they change their habits. Your best bet is to spend a week taking her to the desired spot on leash. Give her lots of treats and praise for going in that spot. Hose down the areas she has been going in to get rid of the scent. Re-training her shouldn't take much longer than a week to a week and a half.

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Libby
Black lab/hound
3 Years
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Libby
Black lab/hound
3 Years

Libby is being trained for the electric fence and since she is still afraid to approach her normal poop spot due to the flags she has switched to another spot out front. I would like her to resume her old spot.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest taking pup outside on a leash and playing with her and practicing commands and tricks she knows, or games like finding treats in the grass (as long as the grass hasn't been recently treated with anything toxic). Do this on a leash or long leash to help her avoid the boundaries, so that she won't accidentally get shocked and become more fearful. You want to show her that being outside in that yard is still safe as long as she avoids the flags. Second, take her potty to the spot she will go in but tell her to "Go Potty" and give a treat after. Once she has learned Go Potty, take her to the old spot to go potty on leash and tell her to "Go Potty" while there. If she goes, give a treat - only give treats for going potty in the correct spot and take her there on leash until she is comfortable going potty again in that spot. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Deuce
German sheppard
12 Weeks
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Deuce
German sheppard
12 Weeks

Getting Deuce to potty in a certain area and not the driveway

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! To help in teaching him to poop in designated areas, spend the next week or so, taking him out on leash to the area you want him to go, and give him a treat and lots of praise for going in that area. He just needs a little redirection and should be just fine after that.

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Gigi
American Eskimo mini
2 Years
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Gigi
American Eskimo mini
2 Years

Hello! I’ve been trying to train my dog to poop on sod on my porch. I was told just to wait till she has to poop, but it’s been almost 24 hours (although she usually poops 2ice a day). Should I continue to take her out to the porch for her to poop or should I cave and just take her outside?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I apologize for the delay. I definitely would not let Gigi go longer than 24 hours. It can cause health issues and also cause pain for her. If she is used to going on a nice walk to eliminate and loses that opportunity, it can be confusing. Sometimes dogs will also be uncomfortable or nervous on a porch. Try putting a few potted plants around the sod and also spray "encouraging spray" on the sod (you buy it at the pet supply store). Take a look here for tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/use-fake-grass. The Dogs Love Routine Method may do the trick! Good luck and all the best to Gigi.

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Gigi
Miniature American Eskimo
2 Years
0 found helpful
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Gigi
Miniature American Eskimo
2 Years

I am trying to train my dog to poop on sod that I have placed on my porch. It's been really really difficult to train her to eliminate there though. She will need to go to the bathroom, but refuses to go and will hold it to up to 24 hours (at which point I feel really bad and take her out). Do you have advice? I have already tried placing pee and poop on the area I want her to go.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! To help in teaching him to poop in designated areas, spend the next week or so, taking him out on leash to the area you want him to go, and give him a treat and lots of praise for going in that area. To encourage her to go, you may want to take her right out after feeding and take a very brisk walk around your house, then take her to the designated spot. Give her 5 minutes to go. If she won't go, walk again and then come back. Walking gets everything moving for them, so it shouldn't be long before she finally goes.

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Piper
hound mix
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Piper
hound mix
7 Months

Hi I'm trying to relocate my puppys potty spot due to an aggressive neighbor. She has taken to a spot in bushes near my apartment that has been her regular spot for about a week. She will go if she needs to when taken there now (5x day, regular times) but has never gone anywhere else in the since I've brought her home (tried dog parks, friends yard, many long walks). She has only had 1 accident since she decided on the spot and can hold it a long time if she wants to (36 hours when I first took her home even though I was taking her out every 2). I do not have the option to continue using that spot- how can I get her to try somewhere else?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! To help in teaching her to poop in designated areas, spend the next week or so, taking her out on leash to the area you want her to go, and give her a treat and lots of praise for going in that area. To encourage her to go, you may want to take her right out after feeding and take a very brisk walk around your house, then take her to the designated spot. Give her 5 minutes to go. If she won't go, walk again and then come back. Walking gets everything moving for them, so it shouldn't be long before she finally goes.

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Bella
Rhodesian Ridgeback
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Bella
Rhodesian Ridgeback
4 Months

How do I train my dog to not go to the bathroom in the house and not bite ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Kenza
Shih Tzu
4 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Kenza
Shih Tzu
4 Weeks

Keeps peeing everywhere and is scooting

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Bella
german sheperd
3 Years
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Bella
german sheperd
3 Years

She does not poop in the area where we want her to go she goes any where she wants to go but she knows its wrong and runs away from us when we go outside she knows right from wrong what can we do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! To help in teaching her to poop in designated areas, spend the next week or so, taking her out on leash to the area you want her to go, and give her a treat and lots of praise for going in that area. To encourage her to go, you may want to take her right out after feeding and take a very brisk walk around your house, then take her to the designated spot. Give her 5 minutes to go. If she won't go, walk again and then come back. Walking gets everything moving for them, so it shouldn't be long before she finally goes.

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cookie
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
cookie
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

She does not poop and pee on the provided space for her .for instance when she wakes up we take her to that spot but she doesn't eliminate on that spot instead she does it where she is not supposed to be.
Also, she tries to bite a lot.
she is new in our family we just got her.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! To help in teaching her to poop in designated areas, spend the next week or so, taking her out on leash to the area you want her to go, and give her a treat and lots of praise for going in that area. To encourage her to go, you may want to take her right out after feeding and take a very brisk walk around your house, then take her to the designated spot. Give her 5 minutes to go. If she won't go, walk again and then come back. Walking gets everything moving for them, so it shouldn't be long before she finally goes. Don't give her the opportunity to go anywhere else (allowing her to stop and sniff, etc in an other place).

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Question
Kachi
mix criollo
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kachi
mix criollo
6 Months

Kachi was recued as a3 to 4 months puppy and was for 2 months in a vet, recovering from malnutrition and other illness. We adopted him when he was 5 months aprox, but still estayed one month in the vet. He came home a month ago, but we were moving to a new department. So it has been very difficult to train him because the change of place that was a week ago, but also because from 7 am to 4 pm he stays by himself. He poop and pee in the living room when he is alone. He chose that place the first time we were in the place.
thank you for your response

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Gracie
Mutt
5 Months
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Gracie
Mutt
5 Months

Gracie is now potty trained but only poops only deck i take her on walks will not go and I went to a friend's house would not go outside held it all day came home in 12 seconds went on the deck poop and pee will not go anywhere else even tried designated spot outside w her poop still will not go what do I do

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. If you have a crate that you are utilizing with her, you may want to use that to help with this process. If she doesn't go in the area you want her to, do not give her the opportunity to go on the deck. Place her in her crate or a confined area and then take her to the potty spot. Continue with this back and forth method until she finally goes in the area you want, and be sure to give her lots of treats and praise for going in that location. Practice this for about a week or until she starts going in that area on her own.

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Onda
German Shepherd
3 Years
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Onda
German Shepherd
3 Years

she's adopted, she pooped everywhere in the cage she was living (in the kennel)

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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asuka
Mixed
2 Years
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asuka
Mixed
2 Years

adopted pet that will hold urine or poop for over 24 hours if i try to watch so as to reward for good behavior and then the moment i turn my back (if i need the restroom,if i need sleep cause ive been watching her for 20 hours) will go all over the place as in tiny parts of every [poop in like twenty different spots, including somtimes peeing right in front of where she was sitting (not even trying to go to ANY special place) she has even pooped on the bed right next to where she tryed to lay down (never seen this in any dog before) she also does major submissive peeing somtimes when i raise my voice just a little when talking to someone else or the tv she will just start urinating on herself ( i think she was massivly abused before) my biggest downside is i need her trained without going for walks. im basically refusing to get rid of her because thats not how you treat responsibility for another life, but i basicly have near a phobia for getting urine or poop on me (extremely hard just to pick up poop with clear gloves or bag need her to go on pads then i will fold up.) dont know what to do if i never get a chance to reward for good behavior (going for walks isnt really an option but even if she was taken out she will hold for hours outside)

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Reynaldo, It does sound like she may have been at the very least disciplined for going potty in the house (or abused for it likely) - but probably thought the discipline was for pooping in front of a person, so now avoids doing just that. I would purchase a 30'-50' training leash to take her potty outside on, so that she can wander away from you and go potty when she thinks you aren't watching. Once she is doing well going potty that way, I would gradually coil your leash up, subtracting just a foot at a time, so that she doesn't notice you are getting closer - until after about a month she can go potty with you on a normal 6 foot leash. Once she is within closer proximity to you, then you can start tossing a larger treat to her when she goes - at first, you likely need to look like you are ignoring her completely to get her to go. While she is inside, prevent accidents there by either keeping a close eye on her in general, tethering her to yourself with a hands free leash, or crate training her. I highly recommend crate training her for nights and to give you a break too. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below for how to ease her into crate training. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I would involve your vet in this also, to ensure the submissive peeing isn't related to pup having a previous habit of constantly holding their poop and causing a build up of that. I am not a vet though, so consult your vet. For submissive peeing that's related to behavior and not a medical condition, check out the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing Teaching lure reward training obedience commands and tricks, and games like agility can help build overall confidence, as well as pup having time to adjust to you in general and see that you can be trusted. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sweetie
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Years
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Sweetie
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Years

Our dog was using a designated area (potty pad) for elimination, pee and poop. But now only pees there but poops anywhere. What can I do to correct this?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Sometimes dogs need a refresher when it comes to potty training. If you want to continue use of the potty pads, you will essentially have to re-train him as though he were a brand new puppy. Within 2 weeks or so, your dog will be back to his previously learned routine. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Sukkar
Japanese Spitz
3 Months
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Sukkar
Japanese Spitz
3 Months

he bites a lot and eats everything off The ground.
Also, he gets overstimulated and stops listening to commands

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aye, For the biting, first, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the bite inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Check out the article I have linked below on chewing. Especially teaching things like Leave It. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ For general obedience and listening, check out these resources. Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hi,
I am sorry, I posted the wrong question 😅
My question regarding potty training; Sukkar’s problem is with pooping, he knows where to pee (on the pads), but when it comes to pooping he doesn’t, he goes somewhere in the house and does his job and it’s usually the same place.
We are using a playpen where he stays most of the time, and he never poops in it, he waits until we take him out of it and goes to poop.
We live in an apartment so we’re training him on the potty pads.
Thank you

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