How to Train Your Dog to Stay Out of the Kitchen

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Many dog owners do not like their dogs in the kitchen, especially while they are cooking. However, it is often difficult to keep your dog out of the kitchen only when you are cooking. So some owners choose to keep their dogs out of the kitchen altogether. When you are preparing, the last thing you want is dog fur in your food. When you have guests over, no one wants to apologize for the amount of dog fur in their food or in the air around your kitchen while you are cooking. Training your dog to stay out of the kitchen is one of very few ways to ensure your kitchen is free of dog fur, a counter surfing dog, and paws under your feet while you are trying to walk around with hot and dangerous pans. There are plenty of places in your home for your dog to be. If you think the kitchen is not one of them, you can train your dog to stay completely out of the kitchen.

Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog to stay out of the kitchen will require some repetition and simple rules of boundaries. Your dog's entire life will be built around setting boundaries. Setting the boundary outside your kitchen doorway is very similar to setting boundaries you use while you are leash walking or while you are playing. It’s also similar to whether not you let your dog on the furniture. Teaching boundary rules to your dog requires patience and time. Try not to teach this rule to your dog the day you are having a dinner party. Teach your dog to stay out of your kitchen as soon as you move into a new home with your dog or as soon as you get a new dog, so he understands the rules from the start. Training your dog to stay out of the kitchen will require simple training methods while you are in the kitchen and your dog stands just outside the kitchen.

Getting Started

To get started, be sure to have some tasty treats readily available to reward your dog for good behavior. At least one method includes using tape on the floor to mark the boundary for your dog to respect and obey. Keep your sessions short and simple. Try not to train your dog to stay out of the kitchen during stressful times such as preparing a holiday dinner or a meal for a dinner party.

The On a Leash Method

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Step
1
Kitchen introduction
Your kitchen is a room you will use a lot. When you first introduce your dog to your kitchen, place him on a leash so he is in your control and doesn't enter the room.
Step
2
Walk to boundary
With your dog on the leash, walk to the boundary you'd like your dog to know. If he steps over the invisible boundary line, tighten the leash.
Step
3
Reward
Give your pup verbal praise and a treat. If you use a clicker, click and treat.
Step
4
Name the space
You can block off the kitchen while you are away and your dog is training to stay out. While home with your dog, use the word 'kitchen' to define the space. Use this word when you cross the threshold and do not allow your dog to cross with you.
Step
5
Practice
Practice walking to the boundary line while on the leash several times before allowing your dog to be off leash. Watch your dog closely while he is not on his leash for redirection if he crosses the line.
Step
6
Redirect
If your dog crosses the line, say 'no kitchen' and take him out. Reward him after a few moments if he stays on the opposite side of the boundary line.
Step
7
Consistency
Be consistent about your rules in the kitchen. Continue to practice the rules with your dog, allowing him to approach the boundary and rewarding him when he does not cross.
Recommend training method?

The Define Line Method

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Step
1
Tape
Use painter's tape to create a line between the kitchen and the space your dog is allowed to visit. He will be able to cross over the taped line, but your goal will be to teach him not to.
Step
2
Opposite sides
Stand on the kitchen side of the line with your dog on the opposite side. Your dog may try to follow you into the kitchen. Stand firm and gently hold your hand up, telling him not to cross.
Step
3
Redirect
Use a gentle voice to tell your dog to go lay down or stay where he is.
Step
4
Treat
Every few moments your dog stays on his side of the line, acknowledge him with a treat.
Step
5
Drop treats
Drop a few treats on the floor in front of you in the kitchen. Do not make eye contact with your dog. For a few moments, move these treats around.
Step
6
Offer up
As long as your dog stays in place, give him the treats you placed on the kitchen floor. Be sure to give them to him from the kitchen but with him standing on the opposite side of the taped line.
Step
7
Practice
Every time you come into the kitchen, give your dog a treat as long as he stays on the line or at least on the opposite side of the line. Practice this several times for a few weeks. Eventually, your dog will understand his boundaries.
Recommend training method?

The Redirect from Start Method

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Step
1
Walk
Walk with your dog to the edge of the kitchen. This will be your boundary line you do not want the dog to cross.
Step
2
Sit
Stop at the line and ask your dog to sit. Offer him a treat for sitting.
Step
3
Cross over
Cross the imaginary boundary line and stop just inside the kitchen. Turn around, acknowledge your dog, and give him a treat.
Step
4
Redirect
If your dog steps over the line, cross back over yourself, keeping him out of the kitchen. Give him a treat.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat these steps. Your goal will be to take more steps into the kitchen before giving your dog a treat while he waits for you just outside the kitchen.
Step
6
Practice
Repeat these steps each time you enter the kitchen. If your dog follows, give him a treat as you enter, leaving him on the boundary line. Continue to build your movement around the kitchen with your dog waiting patiently outside the kitchen. Be sure to take moments to reward his good behavior with treats.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Kofi
Cavapoo
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kofi
Cavapoo
12 Weeks

Toilet training in an apartment. We have a balcony and trying to teach her to go outside on pee pads until we can take her downstairs. I know she is little and it is just taking soooo much energy. I am not a young person and finding it difficult. Thank you

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with her to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Question
Buddha
Labrador Retriever
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Buddha
Labrador Retriever
5 Years

He stays out of kitchen when we’re in there but the minute we leave or take a shower he’s in there jumping in counters to find food left out

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ann, I suggest booby trapping the counters so that when he jumps or grabs onto food something surprises him. Check out the article linked below. https://www.itsadogsworld.biz/stop-your-dog-from-counter-surfing/ There are numerous ways to booby trap a counter, from a scat mat, e-collar, tying a string to a bag of food and attaching it to something that makes a loud noise when the bag is grabbed - like metal pot lids, sheet pans, or bean filled cans. Whichever method you choose, make sure it's set up in a way that the dog won't actually be injured. For example, tie an extra string through pot lids and tie that to something secure on the counter like a knob so that the pans won't fall all the way to the floor and hit your dog. You should be hiding in another room listening for the booby trap or watching via a camera. As soon as pup gets surprised go back in to pick up any food left out so pup won't return to the scene of the crime and eat the food once they are over the initial scare - eating the food after the fact might convince pup it was worth the surprise and make the training ineffective. You also need to prevent access to the kitchen when you don't have booby traps set up while pup is still learning and might jump up...Each time pup jumps up there needs to be a consequence until pup stops jumping, so that the training is consistent (he doesn't jump up and get food or get to sniff some of the times and jumps up and gets a consequence at other times). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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