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How to Train Your Dog to Stay Out of the Kitchen

How to Train Your Dog to Stay Out of the Kitchen
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon3-6 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

Many dog owners do not like their dogs in the kitchen, especially while they are cooking. However, it is often difficult to keep your dog out of the kitchen only when you are cooking. So some owners choose to keep their dogs out of the kitchen altogether. When you are preparing, the last thing you want is dog fur in your food. When you have guests over, no one wants to apologize for the amount of dog fur in their food or in the air around your kitchen while you are cooking. Training your dog to stay out of the kitchen is one of very few ways to ensure your kitchen is free of dog fur, a counter surfing dog, and paws under your feet while you are trying to walk around with hot and dangerous pans. There are plenty of places in your home for your dog to be. If you think the kitchen is not one of them, you can train your dog to stay completely out of the kitchen.

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Defining Tasks

Teaching your dog to stay out of the kitchen will require some repetition and simple rules of boundaries. Your dog's entire life will be built around setting boundaries. Setting the boundary outside your kitchen doorway is very similar to setting boundaries you use while you are leash walking or while you are playing. It’s also similar to whether not you let your dog on the furniture. Teaching boundary rules to your dog requires patience and time. Try not to teach this rule to your dog the day you are having a dinner party. Teach your dog to stay out of your kitchen as soon as you move into a new home with your dog or as soon as you get a new dog, so he understands the rules from the start. Training your dog to stay out of the kitchen will require simple training methods while you are in the kitchen and your dog stands just outside the kitchen.

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Getting Started

To get started, be sure to have some tasty treats readily available to reward your dog for good behavior. At least one method includes using tape on the floor to mark the boundary for your dog to respect and obey. Keep your sessions short and simple. Try not to train your dog to stay out of the kitchen during stressful times such as preparing a holiday dinner or a meal for a dinner party.

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The Define Line Method

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1

Tape

Use painter's tape to create a line between the kitchen and the space your dog is allowed to visit. He will be able to cross over the taped line, but your goal will be to teach him not to.

2

Opposite sides

Stand on the kitchen side of the line with your dog on the opposite side. Your dog may try to follow you into the kitchen. Stand firm and gently hold your hand up, telling him not to cross.

3

Redirect

Use a gentle voice to tell your dog to go lay down or stay where he is.

4

Treat

Every few moments your dog stays on his side of the line, acknowledge him with a treat.

5

Drop treats

Drop a few treats on the floor in front of you in the kitchen. Do not make eye contact with your dog. For a few moments, move these treats around.

6

Offer up

As long as your dog stays in place, give him the treats you placed on the kitchen floor. Be sure to give them to him from the kitchen but with him standing on the opposite side of the taped line.

7

Practice

Every time you come into the kitchen, give your dog a treat as long as he stays on the line or at least on the opposite side of the line. Practice this several times for a few weeks. Eventually, your dog will understand his boundaries.

The On a Leash Method

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1

Kitchen introduction

Your kitchen is a room you will use a lot. When you first introduce your dog to your kitchen, place him on a leash so he is in your control and doesn't enter the room.

2

Walk to boundary

With your dog on the leash, walk to the boundary you'd like your dog to know. If he steps over the invisible boundary line, tighten the leash.

3

Reward

Give your pup verbal praise and a treat. If you use a clicker, click and treat.

4

Name the space

You can block off the kitchen while you are away and your dog is training to stay out. While home with your dog, use the word 'kitchen' to define the space. Use this word when you cross the threshold and do not allow your dog to cross with you.

5

Practice

Practice walking to the boundary line while on the leash several times before allowing your dog to be off leash. Watch your dog closely while he is not on his leash for redirection if he crosses the line.

6

Redirect

If your dog crosses the line, say 'no kitchen' and take him out. Reward him after a few moments if he stays on the opposite side of the boundary line.

7

Consistency

Be consistent about your rules in the kitchen. Continue to practice the rules with your dog, allowing him to approach the boundary and rewarding him when he does not cross.

The Redirect from Start Method

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Walk

Walk with your dog to the edge of the kitchen. This will be your boundary line you do not want the dog to cross.

2

Sit

Stop at the line and ask your dog to sit. Offer him a treat for sitting.

3

Cross over

Cross the imaginary boundary line and stop just inside the kitchen. Turn around, acknowledge your dog, and give him a treat.

4

Redirect

If your dog steps over the line, cross back over yourself, keeping him out of the kitchen. Give him a treat.

5

Repeat

Repeat these steps. Your goal will be to take more steps into the kitchen before giving your dog a treat while he waits for you just outside the kitchen.

6

Practice

Repeat these steps each time you enter the kitchen. If your dog follows, give him a treat as you enter, leaving him on the boundary line. Continue to build your movement around the kitchen with your dog waiting patiently outside the kitchen. Be sure to take moments to reward his good behavior with treats.

By Stephanie Plummer

Published: 10/17/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Rocket

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Jry

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3 Months

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Question

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He doesn't listen. Have to start his training but he did not sit a one place

June 26, 2022

Rocket's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ritika, Check out this article on listening: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Check out these puppy training class videos. Once a puppy learns what a command means, pup also need to gradually work up to obeying that command around distractions in order to be able to obey in real life. At three months old, it's normal for pup to be very easily distracted, so a lot more practice in different situations is probably needed, using every day life rewards, like setting pup's food bowl dog or tossing the toy pup wants, to reward pup's obedience throughout the day. Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 27, 2022

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Pretty Girl

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American Bulldog

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3 Years

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Hello! I just rescued this female bully about three months ago. At first she was doing ok with the rules and such. But this past few weeks has been horrible! She will pee and poop in the house if me or my husband even uses the bathroom or leaves the house. And my biggest issue is she almost tramples you to chase you into the kitchen. im afraid she is going to hurt my son or my 70 year old mother in law that lives with us. she is very large and strong and doesnt seem to care when she injures us just to try to get some food. we never reward her when she does this behaviour however she doesnt see me as the leader of the house, just my husband, but hes at work all day and im home with her, so she doesnt really respect me. i have to say things multiple times for her to even act like she hears me and i know she can shes just choosing to ignore it. im really struggling as i got another needy dog at home, 3 cats, a rescue to run all while taking care of my child and mother in law at the same time. i neeed help getting her into shape. all my dogs ive ever had have been extremely well behaved luckily so this is all new to me. any words of advice to get her to respect me without having to yell at her bc she gets scared and cowers when yelled at and then doesnt do anything you ask her to at all. i need her to stay out of the kitchen except to pass through it to go potty outside. and i need her to start respecting me as Alpha as i am the one home all day everyday with her not my husband. i greatly appreciate anything you can tell me to help me! if you need any more info please reach out!

June 18, 2022

Pretty Girl's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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Hello Brittany, Is she crate trained? If not, I would start by crate training and crating when you leave. Crate Training - surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I would also teach Place to help build independence so you can leave the room, and it can later be used in areas like to kitchen to teach manners. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s For the running, I would work on the Turns method. I would start this in your yard, then work on it even in the house. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel I would create a rule where pup has to stay a certain distance away from the kitchen on Place to be allowed in that part of the home. Every time pup tries to enter that area, send pup to a Place bed you have set up and taught. This is going to take a lot of repetition at first. The goal is for pup to go into that sidelined area instead of directly into the kitchen, and to slow down getting there because you have worked on the turns method and pup not cutting in front of people. When pup starts to run, remind pup to heel so they have to walk with you to get there and not rush ahead. For building respect for you, check out the article I have linked below. For her, I would especially work on the Working method - with is not very confrontational but still strict. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Anxious dogs also tend to benefit from adding structure, so some increased structure might help other areas too in general. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 20, 2022


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