How to Train a Rottweiler Puppy to Not be Aggressive

Medium
2-4 Months
Behavior

Introduction

For any owner of a large dog, knowing the strength and reputation of the breed is essential. While smaller breeds may lend themselves to the idea of a dog nestled in a purse and yapping happily all the way, a larger breed may offer a much more intimidating presence. Large dogs can be seen as dangerous, scary, or even aggressive, and though many of them are quite friendly, being able to maintain control over a large dog’s behavior may make all the difference.

Among the larger breeds known for an intimidating appearance, the Rottweiler stands out as the “bad boy” of them all. With a large head, dark colored fur, and powerful body, the Rottweiler can be a formidable companion. However, many Rotties, as they’re affectionately called, are loving family dogs when given the right training and socialization early on in life. To prevent a Rottweiler puppy from becoming aggressive, you must prepare for every situation to ensure that your dog grows to be happy and well behaved.

Defining Tasks

Some puppies may begin to show aggressive tendencies early on. Unlike smaller breeds which may not be able to do much damage if a bite occurs, a large dog can quickly become an issue if he begins to show aggression. Whether that aggression is occurring because of fear, resource guarding, or overexcitement, it should be addressed as soon as possible.

Aggression in Rottweiler puppies can be tackled in a variety of ways, though the best method is a combination of methods. Socialization and positive reinforcement should begin as soon as you bring your Rottweiler puppy home and continue for the first two to four months of his life in order to properly establish good behavior around people and other dogs.

Getting Started

Before targeting aggression in your puppy, ensure that the aggression is not a result of illness or injury. Have him checked by a veterinarian to rule out any health problems. Following that, you should gather up some tasty treats and toys in order to act as motivators for your Rottweiler’s training. The better rewards you can offer for good behavior, the more likely it will be that your puppy will respond well to your training.

Be sure to supervise any interaction with other dogs or small children, as a bite or a fight can occur very quickly and suddenly. Be prepared to remove your puppy from any stressful situation.

The Socialization Method

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Step
1
Start early
Your puppy should begin his socialization once he receives all of his vaccinations. The earlier you can begin, the more likely it will be that your Rottweiler will associate good things with meeting others.
Step
2
Meet friendly dogs
Start with meeting other dogs that are calm and well mannered. They will be less likely to overwhelm or frighten your puppy.
Step
3
Meet safe people
Allow your puppy to come in contact with all kinds of people of varying genders, races, and appearances. The more varied the people your puppy meets, the less likely he will be to show aggression to any one type of person.
Step
4
Explore public areas
When it is safe to do so, take your Rottweiler puppy to safe public spaces such as pet stores or to the park where he can observe and encounter other dogs and people. Be aware of possible stressful situations and be ready to remove your puppy if he becomes overwhelmed.
Step
5
Make every experience a good one
Allow for plenty of praise and rewards for good behavior around others. Offer your puppy treats and play time with different, fun toys throughout these encounters in order to associate good things with meeting new people and animals.
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The Manners Method

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Basic obedience
Begin by teaching your puppy basic obedience commands such as ‘sit’, ‘stay’, and ‘come’. These will offer her a strong foundation for more training later on.
Step
2
Asking permission
Get your puppy used to asking permission for things like being fed, playing with toys, or being let outside for a walk or run. Have her ask permission by sitting in front of you before you give her what she wants.
Step
3
Learning to ignore
Some other dogs and people may be poorly behaved around your puppy. Teach her to ignore these people or dogs by making yourself more interesting or working on obedience around them.
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4
Training on the go
Always be prepared to train when out and about with either treats or toys on hand for quick obedience training.
Step
5
Training in the home
Have treats available in multiple rooms of the house to be ready to reward your puppy for any good behavior she exhibits. Be ready to reinforce positive progress at any time.
Recommend training method?

The Conditioning Method

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Use a motivator
Determine what encourages your dog the most. Some work well for treats and others work better for toys. Test some different rewards out with your puppy to see which he prefers or use both together.
Step
2
Get some help
Enlist the help of friends or family to help reinforce good behavior with your puppy both in the home and outside of the home.
Step
3
Have your tools available
Be ready to take your puppy’s focus whenever a possible issue may arise. Have your treats or toys on hand.
Step
4
Reward whenever possible
Always reward for good behavior around other people or animals, especially early on. Lots of rewards and affection will ensure a positive association instead of an aggressive or fearful one.
Step
5
Reinforcement
Reinforce positive associations throughout the training period and even well into adulthood. Your dog will love to be reminded of what good behavior earns him and can shape his behavior later on.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Success Stories

Success
Rex
Ridgeback
4 Years

I bought my dog when he was 2 years old. He didn't know any tricks or so. After some time I thought why cant i teach him . My parents are always bragging about how good their dogs are, but 1 things for sure that they are only good at being lazy. So I taught my dog how to sit. Every time I say sit Rex is always sitting. I just kept saying sit. In the beginning if Rex didn't obey my orders I would just hit him on the butt not to hard( like a friendly hit) then he understood what I meant.

3 months, 3 weeks ago
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Pweeeze!
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