How to Train a Rottweiler Puppy to Not be Aggressive

Medium
2-4 Months
Behavior

Introduction

For any owner of a large dog, knowing the strength and reputation of the breed is essential. While smaller breeds may lend themselves to the idea of a dog nestled in a purse and yapping happily all the way, a larger breed may offer a much more intimidating presence. Large dogs can be seen as dangerous, scary, or even aggressive, and though many of them are quite friendly, being able to maintain control over a large dog’s behavior may make all the difference.

Among the larger breeds known for an intimidating appearance, the Rottweiler stands out as the “bad boy” of them all. With a large head, dark colored fur, and powerful body, the Rottweiler can be a formidable companion. However, many Rotties, as they’re affectionately called, are loving family dogs when given the right training and socialization early on in life. To prevent a Rottweiler puppy from becoming aggressive, you must prepare for every situation to ensure that your dog grows to be happy and well behaved.

Defining Tasks

Some puppies may begin to show aggressive tendencies early on. Unlike smaller breeds which may not be able to do much damage if a bite occurs, a large dog can quickly become an issue if he begins to show aggression. Whether that aggression is occurring because of fear, resource guarding, or overexcitement, it should be addressed as soon as possible.

Aggression in Rottweiler puppies can be tackled in a variety of ways, though the best method is a combination of methods. Socialization and positive reinforcement should begin as soon as you bring your Rottweiler puppy home and continue for the first two to four months of his life in order to properly establish good behavior around people and other dogs.

Getting Started

Before targeting aggression in your puppy, ensure that the aggression is not a result of illness or injury. Have him checked by a veterinarian to rule out any health problems. Following that, you should gather up some tasty treats and toys in order to act as motivators for your Rottweiler’s training. The better rewards you can offer for good behavior, the more likely it will be that your puppy will respond well to your training.

Be sure to supervise any interaction with other dogs or small children, as a bite or a fight can occur very quickly and suddenly. Be prepared to remove your puppy from any stressful situation.

The Socialization Method

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Step
1
Start early
Your puppy should begin his socialization once he receives all of his vaccinations. The earlier you can begin, the more likely it will be that your Rottweiler will associate good things with meeting others.
Step
2
Meet friendly dogs
Start with meeting other dogs that are calm and well mannered. They will be less likely to overwhelm or frighten your puppy.
Step
3
Meet safe people
Allow your puppy to come in contact with all kinds of people of varying genders, races, and appearances. The more varied the people your puppy meets, the less likely he will be to show aggression to any one type of person.
Step
4
Explore public areas
When it is safe to do so, take your Rottweiler puppy to safe public spaces such as pet stores or to the park where he can observe and encounter other dogs and people. Be aware of possible stressful situations and be ready to remove your puppy if he becomes overwhelmed.
Step
5
Make every experience a good one
Allow for plenty of praise and rewards for good behavior around others. Offer your puppy treats and play time with different, fun toys throughout these encounters in order to associate good things with meeting new people and animals.
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The Manners Method

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Step
1
Basic obedience
Begin by teaching your puppy basic obedience commands such as ‘sit’, ‘stay’, and ‘come’. These will offer her a strong foundation for more training later on.
Step
2
Asking permission
Get your puppy used to asking permission for things like being fed, playing with toys, or being let outside for a walk or run. Have her ask permission by sitting in front of you before you give her what she wants.
Step
3
Learning to ignore
Some other dogs and people may be poorly behaved around your puppy. Teach her to ignore these people or dogs by making yourself more interesting or working on obedience around them.
Step
4
Training on the go
Always be prepared to train when out and about with either treats or toys on hand for quick obedience training.
Step
5
Training in the home
Have treats available in multiple rooms of the house to be ready to reward your puppy for any good behavior she exhibits. Be ready to reinforce positive progress at any time.
Recommend training method?

The Conditioning Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Use a motivator
Determine what encourages your dog the most. Some work well for treats and others work better for toys. Test some different rewards out with your puppy to see which he prefers or use both together.
Step
2
Get some help
Enlist the help of friends or family to help reinforce good behavior with your puppy both in the home and outside of the home.
Step
3
Have your tools available
Be ready to take your puppy’s focus whenever a possible issue may arise. Have your treats or toys on hand.
Step
4
Reward whenever possible
Always reward for good behavior around other people or animals, especially early on. Lots of rewards and affection will ensure a positive association instead of an aggressive or fearful one.
Step
5
Reinforcement
Reinforce positive associations throughout the training period and even well into adulthood. Your dog will love to be reminded of what good behavior earns him and can shape his behavior later on.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Champ
Rottweiler
11 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Champ
Rottweiler
11 Weeks

We have the usual puppy biting and nipping but sometimes Champ will bite at your face if he is mad at you for taking something away or removing him from where he wants to be. We just bought him a new chew bone and he guards it fiercely. He growls if you try and take it. Just a little concerned about his aggression so far. He sits, lays down and is learning off. He is already crate trained and very smart. Do you feel he is so young and still learning or do we need to be overly concerned?
Thank you!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erica, You absolutely need to hire a professional trainer with experience in resource guarding and and possessiveness to come to your home and work with you. The mouthing and play biting is normal, but the resource guarding needs to be stopped right away or will get very dangerous. Every time he does it and is left alone or has a bad experience, it is likely getting worse and can lead to serious issues as he ages. He probably has a strong personality and is a dog that needs a lot of structure and boundaries. Look for a trainer who uses boundaries, structure, fair corrections, and positive reinforcement. Many of these trainers call themselves balanced trainers. Look for reviews online or ask for client referrals. Not all trainers are skilled at dealing with aggression properly. You need someone who can show you how to lead him, show him that possessiveness will not be tolerated, but also build his trust and make you approaching him when he has something a pleasant experience for him when he is tolerant. Essentially, you need to build both trust and respect, not just one or the other. Check out Shaun O'Shay from the Good Dog Training online for some examples of what using positive reinforcement, implementing structure, and using fair corrections can look like for an older dog too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zeus
Rottweiler and American Bulldog
8 Weeks
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Question
1 found helpful
Zeus
Rottweiler and American Bulldog
8 Weeks

Hi! Recently my puppy Zeus has become what I would call aggressive. Nothing over the top, but certainly more than play biting or nipping. There are time when we go to pick him up that he growls and begins to bite us. Secondly, he has started to react to corrections. If we take a toy away or touch him while we tell him no then he gets mad and begins to bite. At first this was only happening occasionally, but it has become more frequent now that he is getting older. How can we put a stop to this? Any advice or help you could provide would be much appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shay, If he really is reacting out of aggression and not just playing, then I suggest hiring a professional trainer right now. Aggression that young is unusual. Look for a trainer who uses both positive reinforcement and fair corrections with structure, but who will use positive reinforcement most at his age. Also, check out the free PDF e-book download "AFTER You Get Your Puppy" on my website: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Lucie
Rottweiler
2 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Lucie
Rottweiler
2 Months

Sir my pet is too much aggressive and even start fight with me . I was the only best care taker of it , even though it comes on to me and bites hard . As it's tooth were too sharp it hurts me a lot. If it bite others in another month it causes severe problems . Please Help me to reduce its aggressiveness and calm down.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sainath, At two months old puppies normally bite because that is not they interact with other dogs to play and communicate, and how they learn about things around them. They have to learn during puppihood not to bite people. This can take around three months to teach even when done correctly. Check out the article linked below and work on the Leave It method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If the biting continues past seven months of age, it is time to get professional help, because biting in an older dog is more likely aggression. At two months of age it is normal puppy biting though and typically done as play or a tantrum (like toddlers sort of) and is not true aggression, so it is treated differently than aggression. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
max
Rottweiler
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
max
Rottweiler
5 Months

When i try and take something away from max he growls and tries to bite often. He had some paper in his mouth and i tried to take it away and he bit my finger causing bleeding. I have always had rottweilers and never seen this before.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joe, The behavior you described is called resource guarding and because it is happening at such a young age I HIGHLY recommend hiring a professional private trainer, who specializes in aggression to help you with this issue. This will only get worse if left unaddressed and because of his age, it is even more important to not wait to hire help. You can work on teaching a "Drop It" command using positive reinforcement. I also suggest teaching Out (which means leave the area) and Leave It. You really need someone to evaluate pup overall though - you may need to do some respect and trust building exercises, things like a structured heel, long place command, having pup work for everything they get by doing a command first, teaching more boundaries around the house, working on desensitizing to touch and handling. Teaching pup to anticipate good things when you approach them - to build trust, while also teaching pup proper respect for you using structure and boundaries through training (not through bullying puppy and creating fear). Without knowing more I can't give specific advice, which is another good reason to hire a professional to help you - so they can address any related underlying issues that are contributing to the early resource guarding. Check out Thomas from the Canine Educator on YouTube for an example of the type of trainer to look for. Ask any trainer you consult a lot of questions about their experience and how they train. Read or ask for client referrals or reviews from those whose dogs struggled with aggression. Many trainers only teach obedience or sportsdog training. You need to specifically find someone who is very experienced with behavior issues and lots of different types of aggression and will work one-on-one with you, to offer guidance and help. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailey
Rottweiler
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Bailey
Rottweiler
7 Weeks

Hello, I've been having a massive issue with my new pup biting a ton and nothing seems to be working. Whenever I do try to correct her behaviour, she becomes aggressive and starts snapping/barking/growling/biting very hard, any tips on how to stop this from happening?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kristina, If you can find a good puppy kindergarten class with time for off-leash play or a free puppy play date class attend one of those with her so that she can learn how to control the pressure of her bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. A paid kindergarten class would have the benefits of training too. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Just be sure that the class requires pups to be up to date on vaccines, cleans their floors with a cleaner that kills parvo and distemper, and keeps non-class participants out of the area once the floors are clean. You can also request shoes be taken off outside of class, and be sure to carry pup into the class so that they don't contact non-cleaned floors before they have all their shots. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Most puppies take about 3 months to really do well with mouthing even with consistent training - my goal for puppies is to have them stop completely by 5 months of age - when their jaws get stronger. Commands that increase self-control in general and teach pup calmness are also good things to teach. These commands will take time to teach of course, but if your pup is a bolder pup, these commands would be especially good to work on over the next year. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Chiku
Rottweiler
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Chiku
Rottweiler
2 Months

Chiku is very aggressive when she is eating some food.
Gusse me kisi ko bhi nhi samjhti
Kayi baar bite kar chuki hai
Ye bahut badi problem hai
Ghar waale bhi bilkul pareshaan ho jaa rahe usase
Aap kuch suggest kariye ,how to handle .

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kiran, Work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold her collar and give a treat. Touch her tail gently and give a treat. Touch her belly, her other paws, her chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Work on hand feeding, and also practice feeding her her meals in sections. Feed 1/4 of her meal, practice making her wait before digging in by holding onto the bowl, pulling it back whenever she tries to dive in (without letting go of it first), and calmly saying Wait, then after a few repetitions of this, when she hesitates and doesn't dive in while your hand is still on it, let go of the bowl and say "Okay!" in an excited tone of voice, and let her begin eating as a reward for waiting. As she eats, when she isn't growling, toss treats next to her bowl as you walk past her. Practice this from a few feet away until she begins to look forward to you approaching. As she improves, decrease the distance that you pass from. When she finishes the first serving, toss a treat behind her and pick up the bowl while she is distracted eating the treat. Give the next portion, have her practice waiting again, then do the treat tosses while she eats again. Practice this until she has all of her meal kibble portions at that mealtime. Do this at every meal as often as you can. As she becomes relaxed and begins to like you approaching her during meals, get closer and closer, so that you are eventually placing treats into her bowl while she eats. Ease into this so that she stays relaxed during the process. When pup does great with your presence right by the bowl, you can give a gentle pet and feed a treat as you do so. Pet and feed a treat, then give space and go back to tossing the treats to avoid stressing her too much. Expect this progression to take weeks, not hours or days. Do NOT stick your hand in pup's food, take the food away while she is eating, or pet her while she is eating without making the experience fun for her also - via giving better rewards in exchange each time. Messing with a dog while they are eating without the right protocols and rewards to prevent stress around mealtimes, can actually cause food aggression, rather than prevent it. The goal is to build pup's trust with you when it comes to meals - so she doesn't feel the need to guard it, but learns that your approach and taking things like bones, results in something even better happening - like a treat or new bone. Only give treats when pup responds well - not while she is growling. If pup is growling still while you are doing all of this, you are probably being too rough or moving too fast, and there needs to be more space between you and pup while practicing at that point in the training. Check out this free PDF e-book download for other puppy raising tips as well: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
King
Rottweiler
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
King
Rottweiler
6 Weeks

Hi, I got king about a week ago. I’m in the middle of potty training, I reward him when he does good and I talk all happy and pet him. But once I go to pick him up to love/kiss on him he immediately starts growling and possibly trying to bite. And he also has food aggression, I’m trying the feeding him out of my hand and petting him but he’ll still growl and I’ve thumped him on his nose or butt and he tries snapping. I want to break his aggression as soon as possible, I just need to know the right steps. Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kylee, At six weeks, it is very young to see true aggression - play growling and not being used to handling are normal though. If this issue continues I would suggest hiring a professional trainer to evaluate him early and get a head start on aggression - I am glad you are being proactive now. Good job. Work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. In addition to hand feeding him, also practice feeding him his meals in sections. Feed 1/4 of his meal, practice making him wait before digging in by holding onto the bowl, pulling it back whenever he tries to dive in (without letting go of it first), and calmly saying Wait, then after a few repetitions of this, when he hesitates and doesn't dive in while your hand is still on it, let go of the bowl and say "Okay!" in an excited tone of voice, and let him begin eating as a reward for waiting. As he eats, when he isn't growling, toss treats next to his bowl as you walk past him. Practice this from a few feet away until he begins to look forward to you approaching. As he improves, decrease the distance that you pass from. When he finishes the first serving, toss a treat behind him and pick up the bowl while he is distracted eating the treat. Gve the next portion, have him practice waiting again, then do the treat tosses while he east again. Practice this until he has all of his meal kibble portions at that mealtime. Do this at every meal as often as you can. As he becomes relaxed and begins to like you approaching him during meals, get closer and closer, so that you are eventually placing treats into his bowl while he eats. Ease into this so that he stays relaxed during the process. When pup does great with your presence right by the bowl, you can give a gentle pet and feed a treat as you do so. Pet and feed a treat, then give space and go back to tossing the treats to avoid stressing him too much. Expect this progression to take weeks, not hours or days. Do NOT stick your hand in pup's food, take the food away while he is eating, or pet him while he is eating without making the experience fun for him also - via giving better rewards in exchange each time. Messing with a dog while they are eating without the right protocols and rewards to prevent stress around mealtimes, can actually cause food aggression, rather than prevent it. The goal is to build pup's trust with you when it comes to meals - so he doesn't feel the need to guard it, but learns that your approach and taking things like bones, results in something even better happening - like a treat or new bone. Only give treats when pup responds well - not while he is growling. If pup is growling still while you are doing all of this, you are probably being too rough or moving too fast, and there needs to be more space between you and pup while practicing at that point in the training. Check out this free PDF e-book download for other puppy raising tips as well: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Zobia
Rottweiler
9 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Zobia
Rottweiler
9 Weeks

Zobia is usually a pretty calm dog. But whenever she wants something, whether she's hungry, thirsty, has to go to the bathroom, or just bored, she bites. And it hurts. With her being a Rottweiler, we NEED her to be docile almost all the time. What should we do to train her not to bite?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hanna, Check out the article that I have linked below. The biting that you are experiencing now is normal puppy biting. She is biting you to get attention the way she would with litter mates. It is completely normal, but puppies do need our help to learn how to control their mouths. From the article linked below follow the "Bite Inhibition" method. This will deal with her doing it to get attention also. Go ahead and start using that but also be teaching her the "Leave It" command at the same time because around four months of age you will switch to using Leave It. Once she knows Leave It and can do that command, you can use the Pressure method from the article to gently disciple disobedience to your Leave It command. It's important to teach Leave It first though or she might think you are just rough housing when you use the Pressure Method - the command helps her understand what you want her to do. The article mentions Shit Tzu's but the training is the same for all puppies in this case. Puppy biting article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite You should see gradual improvement with the biting if the training is working. It takes puppies several months to learn complete control though - especially while they are in the teething and jaw development phases where the need to mouth and chew it strong. Stay consistent. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Maya
Rottweiler
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Maya
Rottweiler
11 Weeks

My puppy is too aggressive, it’s biting on things and us too much, and gets over excited please help us this

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sainath, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. For the jumping, check out the Step Toward method. Be gentle and calm when doing this at this age. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Finally, check out the free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy, that can be downloaded at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Archie
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Archie
Rottweiler
3 Months

we have had him for 4 weeks he was toilet trained straight the way, very loving, quick to learn all the basic commands.. yesterday out of know where when my husband was stroking him he snapped up with a snarl and drew blood on his nose, this has really upset us all. we said a firm no and left the room, we could tell he knew he had done wrong. The same day he was having a lot of accidents indoors which he hasn't done before, we ignored and just cleared them up and made sure to give lots of praise when he urinated outside. He woke more through the night to urinate (around 4 times, usually only once) .. Today he has been snarling a lot again, not affectionate like usual, acting dominant and snapping out again. we are doing everything right from what we have read from many books and articles.. any advice much appreciated. thank you, Jess

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like you have a good grasp on how to deal with any problems that may arise. And you are doing everything right. Typically when dogs suddenly start behaving much different out of nowhere, there could be a potential medical issue going on. It sounds to me like he is in pain. I would have him checked out by your veterinarian. I will send you information on nipping/snapping. But I am fairly confident he has an issue that will either go away on it's own, or needs to be evaluated. Puppies often go through phases. One day they are fine, the next it's bordering chaos, then they are fine again. So for now, just keep your routines the same, your behaviors the same, and support him for the time being. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Max
Rottweiler
10 Months
0 found helpful
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Max
Rottweiler
10 Months

Max is the youngest of our dogs. We have two other large breeds (shepherd and a Great Pyrenees). We got Max from a local breeder when he was about 9 weeks old. He's been a good puppy, very smart. The issue is that he's becoming more agressive. Once a week my sons Golden comes over to get some socialization and Max wants to play with him, but at the same time he often acts up. He growls pretty fiercely at the other two dogs at times (different days) for unknown reasons. Tonight my husband was playing with him and out of nowhere he nipped in the lip making it bleed. He appears health, running and playing, and eating well/drinking (no signs that he's sick). It's not the first time he was aggressive with my husband, just the first time he drew blood. My husband put him in his crate and we walked away. (He also told him no). I'm concerned that this already large dog is only getting more aggressive. Any ideas?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you are wise to look into this now as yes, Max will grow even bigger. He sounds rather exuberant and yes, could have an aggressive streak. How has he been at obedience classes? If you have not taken him yet, now is the time to start. He's got to learn that nipping, growling, and acting up are not acceptable. That would be my first suggestion. Rottweilers come from a working line of dogs and need both mental and physical stimulation for them to be at their best. You don't want your son's Golden to be adversely affected behavior-wise, either, perhaps becoming timid and submissive due to the situation. Work on the Distract & Discourage Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-play-aggressively. It is a good idea to teach Max the "out" command and give him that instruction when he acts up. Call Max to you, and toss a treat behind him so that he moves in that direction while you say "out." When he reaches the treat, give him praise. After he eats it, say "okay" and encourage him to come back. Keep repeating the exercise until Max understands that "out" means to move away. You can reward him with a treat for moving away as well, gradually phasing that out. Be firm and make sure that Max stays out until you give him permission to come back to you. This is only a part of the picture, though.The Leave It Method described here should also be worked on consistently: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. Don't rule out a private trainer either, if the obedience classes don't bring him in line somewhat. Good luck!

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Dollar
Rottweiler
14 Weeks
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Dollar
Rottweiler
14 Weeks

My dog shows food aggression. Also he gets aggressive while we play with him after some time. He bites our legs when we go to him after some time. I have taught him sit stay leave down come and jump.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Cyrus
Rottweiler
2 Months
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Cyrus
Rottweiler
2 Months

So,the problem with him is that,he is either too silent like a baby or too Hyperactive like MAD.
He bites very hard, when he is in his hyper mode, he doesn't let us walk, he runs to us and holds our leg and bites.
He has caused a lot of marks on my arms and legs.
I know this is normal, the usual biting and nipping, but what caused me fear is due to an incident yesterday where he bit my face and it was bleeding a little.

I am actually kind of scared of him now(Scared in the sense like, He might turn on me When he becomes a big boy,(I'm scared)

Is there any way to make him stop biting very hard, and a way to stop making him go Mad.

THE REAL QUESTION IS, HOW TO STOP AGGRESSIVE PUPPY BITING??

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on puppy nipping/biting and how to correct it. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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chole
Rottweiler
14 Months
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chole
Rottweiler
14 Months

how can i teach my dog not to attack? i think she thinks we are playing but we are not sometimes. she also bites

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Isabel, If pup is acting truly aggressive with intent to harm, I highly suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and comes well recommended by their previous clients with similar needs to help you with this in person. If pup is being mouthy and overly rambunctious, I suggest working on things that build impulse control, such as Leave It and Out. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Other good commands for building self control: Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dakoda
Rottweiler
2 Years
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Dakoda
Rottweiler
2 Years

Hi we have a 2 year old Rottweiler. Dakoda is very loving with our children and us but is very aggressive towards other dogs and people to the point that we cant take her to the dog's park anymore. We are thinking of re-homing her but we so love her and hoping that we the right training we can overcome those problems?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell her fear. First we reduce her fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at her (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Duke
Rottweiler
18 Weeks
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Duke
Rottweiler
18 Weeks

When I take something away from my dog, he bites me. I have 6 stitches in one hand and countless scabs from other bites

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Captain
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Captain
Rottweiler
3 Months

Hello,I just received my 2 months old rottweiler named Captain. I bought it purposely for high security. I want Captain to be extremely aggressive towards strangers but obedient to my household only.

MY OBSERVATIONS
#1 I have observed that it sits on the tail whenever I get close to it, spreads both fore and hind legs and lie on its belly.

My questions..

1 If my observation #1 is a problem how do I solve it.

2 How do I get it to be that aggressive towards strangers.

3 What else can I add to the Pelleted food(raw meat etc.)

4 How do I build it's muscles and make it very strong.

Any other recommendations on general well been of the dog.

Conclusion

I need my rottweiler (Captain) to be very aggressive, very strong and very obedient..

Counting on your prompt response.
Thank you

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I do apologize for the delay. I do not have experience training dogs to be aggressive - you have to be very careful with that and seek out formal training for safety. I will suggest that once Captain has his vaccines up to date that you start his obedience training. He'll form an excellent bond with you and his protective nature will show through. Training in a class with others will enable him to get comfortable around other dogs and be socialized, which is very important. Take a look here for tips on obedience:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. It is fine for Captain to lay like that; it is a common puppy stance. I would ask the provider of his raw food for advice. You have to be careful that Captain is getting all of the nourishment he needs to grow strong and healthy. Good luck with your puppy; do make sure to approach his training in a safe manner and get solid advice from a knowledgeable and positive minded trainer.All the best to Captain!

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Simba
Rottweiler
3 Years
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Simba
Rottweiler
3 Years

He’s a good boy but when it comes to food and toys he gets really aggressive. Also I was wondering what I could do to get him to stop jumping up on people. It was his 2nd time at the dog park and he usually gets along with calmer dogs but sometimes he barks at other dogs that are more energetic. I want to train him so he would be more obedient so I wouldn’t worry about any incidents at the dog park.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melanie, I recommend working with a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, including resource guarding, to work on Drop It with you, desensitizing pup to you being near his food or toys - via tossing treats to pup from a distance far enough away pup stays calm when they respond well, and gradually decreasing the distance overtime as pup improves and begins to expect good things when you appear while they have a toy or food. Once you can walk within a food of pup while they are eating or chewing and they are happy about it due to the training progress, I would work with a trainer using a fake arm to desensitize pup to being touched at those times - pairing each touch with additional food and treats when pup responds well - this process has to be done very carefully and gradually, possibly with the use of a back tie leash, so I would work on this with a trainer's help and them present. I would also work on building pup's overall respect and trust for you in other ways. Adding in more structure and boundaries, like the methods from the article linked below - specifically the obedience and working methods. I would do these tips very carefully with pup's current aggression, seeking the advice of your trainer on whether additional safety measures need to be taken while establishing new boundaries and expectations for pup around your home. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you For the jumping, is pup jumping up to mount and dominate or because they love people and their body language indicates they are simply happy to see them? How you address the jumping depends a lot on pup's body language at that time and why they are jumping. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bosco
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Bosco
Rottweiler
3 Months

Aggression

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Rocky
Rottweiler
12 Weeks
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Rocky
Rottweiler
12 Weeks

My rottwiler hates me, he loves my mom though. He is an angel with her but when I try to play with him he bites me extremely hard and I am getting realy frustrated with him I don't know what to do!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Lucy
Rottweiler
18 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Lucy
Rottweiler
18 Weeks

She lunges at me growling and trying to bite. I put my knee up, but it doesn't seem to stop it. I'm afraid I'll have to get rid of her and I just lost my other Rotti and it's very upsetting for me to think I have to give her up because of this.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Rigby
Rottweilerhusky and chocolate lab
5 Months
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Rigby
Rottweilerhusky and chocolate lab
5 Months

Hello I'm at my wits end with my dog Rigby she's 5 months old and I am going nuts with how aggressive she is she bites me on a daily basis she constantly is aggressive when I am trying to play with her or even when I'm not trying to play with her when I'm just trying to cuddle her she is overly aggressive I don't know what to do because I love her but it's getting to the point that I mentally cannot deal with it much longer I want to keep working it out with her

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aleks, I recommend teaching the Out command, Leave It command, desensitizing pup to being touched, and providing pup with some interactive chew toys to teach pup to direct their aggressive, biting toward chew toys. Out - leave the area command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite To desensitize pup to touch use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup, rewarding pup at the same time you touch so pup isn't biting you while you reward. I recommend feeding pup part of their meals in toys like Kong wobbles, Kong chew toys, puzzle toys, and as treats for obeying commands and tricks. At this age a puppy will have a strong desire to play and chew, so you can teach pup to direct that onto the toys by adding kibble to the toys to make them more interesting, in addition to teaching pup not to put their mouth on you with commands like Leave It. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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zorro
a rottwieler
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
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zorro
a rottwieler
6 Weeks

he bites a lot . he likes chewing on my hand more than his teething toys. his bites leave marks.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Roxy
Rottweiler
2 Months
0 found helpful
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Roxy
Rottweiler
2 Months

She does not say food properly, is in a hurry, hold her, she is very angry, take her to rotate, she is not afraid to come and does not even agree to say.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sonam, I recommend feeding pup part of their food in hollow durable chew toys to slow pup down and stimulate them mentally. I also recommend practicing handling exercises with pup. If you are using any methods that involve physical roughness with your hands, then I would switch to a different method. Use puppy’s daily meal kibble for the handling exercises. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Check out the Bite Inhibition and Leave It method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Anytime you practice manners around food, always make sure its a fun experience with pup to decrease stress around food. Like don't mess with pup while they are eating unless it is to give a tasty treat while they eat - so they associate your approach and touch with something great and look forward to you approaching them while eating, instead of becoming defensive. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocky
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Rocky
Rottweiler
3 Months

Guard training tips for rottweiler puppy

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Manoj, Work on commands that build impulse control and respect for you at this age - that will lay a great foundation for more formal protection training later. Continue to pursue socialization with pup even though that can seem counter-intuitive, because a good protection and guard dog needs to know what's normal in the world, especially around people, so that they can tell when something is wrong correctly and not just react to everything and be unreliable. Good socialization also boosts confidence. Getting pup around a lot of people and places is great, but also work on pup's manners and obedience in those settings so pup is learning to focus on you around those exposures - like practicing heeling past people at a park, a Down-Stay at an outdoor shopping area, sitting for being petted, ect... To help pup learn better self-control and focus, practice the following commands over the next few months. Work up to pup gradually being able to do these things around distractions and for longer periods of time. For example, work up to an hour long Place command, heeling past people at the park, holding a Down-Stay while you walk away at the park while pup is on a long training leash and harness. Those types of commands can also help with respect and trust for you - which is important for guarding work later. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method - good for the mouthing too: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Off- section on The Off command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Check out the article linked below for good respect building tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Many dogs will naturally guard if it's in their genetics and you have laid a good foundation of respect and obedience, once they mature mentally between 1-2 years of age. If pup doesn't, you can also teach pup to bark automatically when someone enters the property and be more watchful in general using reward based training. For anything that would involve bite work, you would need to pursue training with a professional protection trainer who knows how to utilize pup's defense drive, build confidence, utilize rewards like a bite bag and tug, and have the right staff and equipment to practice things like arms holds - this training should only be done with a professionals help and should not encourage fear or true aggression when done correctly - it's more like teaching pup a task, teaching alertness, obedience, building confidence, and encouraging a natural defense drive - opposed to poorly done training that encourages suspicion and fear to get a bite from the dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chop
Rottweiler
5 Months
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Chop
Rottweiler
5 Months

My Rottweiler is a sweetheart so much nicer, calmer than my lab and my boxer mix. Very loving and loves to cuddle. He lets me feed him by hand and plays with his toys with me and on me. I can kiss him and hug him while he playing with his teething toys. Very recently he’s been weird about his food and his toys. Just out of nowhere. I laid by him while he was biting his chew toy and he grabbed the toy and barked at me. Why out of no where is he acting this way. I never wanted a Rottweiler because I didn’t want him to become mean and I was scared, but he just came to us unexpectedly when a friend didn’t want him and we had him since 8 weeks and he’s been an angel until he started doing those couple things.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brittany, I recommend teaching Drop It and regularly practicing with treats so that pup associates you being near the toys and giving something to you with something good to build trust. The Out and Leave It commands are also good for preventing issues and teaching gentle respect. Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Drop It – Exchange method: https://wagwalking.com/training/drop-it To build pup's overall respect for you as they enter adolescence (which is an age where puppies test boundaries and likely why this behavior is showing up at this age), check out the article linked below. The methods in that article are some great things you can do with pup as you raise them to ensure you have a good relationship of trust and respect between you and to help you feel more confident with pup's breed and future size. Listening and Respect: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you For right now, some other good things you can work on, are getting puppy used to touch and handling, to prevent future issues. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Work on hand feeding. If pup has shown any guarding around food also practice feeding him his meals in sections. Feed 1/4 of his meal, practice making him wait before digging in by holding onto the bowl, pulling it back whenever he tries to dive in (without letting go of it first), and calmly saying Wait, then after a few repetitions of this, when he hesitates and doesn't dive in while your hand is still on it, let go of the bowl and say "Okay!" in an excited tone of voice, and let him begin eating as a reward for waiting. As he eats, when he isn't growling, toss treats next to his bowl as you walk past him. Practice this from a few feet away until he begins to look forward to you approaching. As he improves, decrease the distance that you pass from. When he finishes the first serving, toss a treat behind him and pick up the bowl while he is distracted eating the treat. Give the next portion, have him practice waiting again, then do the treat tosses while he east again. Practice this until he has all of his meal kibble portions at that mealtime. Do this at every meal as often as you can. As he becomes relaxed and begins to like you approaching him during meals, get closer and closer, so that you are eventually placing treats into his bowl while he eats. Ease into this so that he stays relaxed during the process. When pup does great with your presence right by the bowl, you can give a gentle pet and feed a treat as you do so. Pet and feed a treat, then give space and go back to tossing the treats to avoid stressing him too much. Expect this progression to take weeks, not hours or days. Do NOT stick your hand in pup's food, take the food away while he is eating, or pet him while he is eating without making the experience fun for him also - via giving better rewards in exchange each time. Messing with a dog while they are eating without the right protocols and rewards to prevent stress around mealtimes, can actually cause food aggression, rather than prevent it. The goal is to build pup's trust with you when it comes to meals - so he doesn't feel the need to guard it, but learns that your approach and taking things like bones, results in something even better happening - like a treat or new bone. Only give treats when pup responds well - not while he is growling. If pup is growling still while you are doing all of this, you are probably being too rough or moving too fast, and there needs to be more space between you and pup while practicing at that point in the training. Many puppies will test things at this age, it's not that uncommon. If addressed when it first shows up it often never turns into a full blown issue. You are doing well to address it early. Even if it's very minor or a one time incident right now, it shouldn't hurt to do any of the training mentioned above as a prevention to give you guys a good foundation, and rebuild your confidence around pup. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Training Success Stories

Success
Rex
Ridgeback
4 Years

I bought my dog when he was 2 years old. He didn't know any tricks or so. After some time I thought why cant i teach him . My parents are always bragging about how good their dogs are, but 1 things for sure that they are only good at being lazy. So I taught my dog how to sit. Every time I say sit Rex is always sitting. I just kept saying sit. In the beginning if Rex didn't obey my orders I would just hit him on the butt not to hard( like a friendly hit) then he understood what I meant.

2 years, 11 months ago
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