How to Train a Shiba Inu to Not Run Away

Hard
3-6 Months
Behavior

Introduction

With stubborn breeds, there’s always an uncertainty whether or not they’ll latch onto certain types of training. A larger breed may struggle with being too rough during play while a smaller dog might not enjoy meeting new people or going to new places. As an owner, there are certain responsibilities to keep in mind when it comes to training for the benefit of your dog’s safety. This especially includes things like keeping him from running away.

One of the notoriously stubborn breeds is the Shiba Inu. These dogs have gone viral in the last few years, popularized by internet videos and pictures and prompting plenty of people to try to bring one home for themselves. However, the Shiba Inu is hard headed and has the reputation of a rebel. This can become dangerous when you’re struggling to keep your headstrong Shiba from bolting out the door and into the street at every opportunity. In order to keep your dog safe, it’s important to establish boundaries early on.

Defining Tasks

Shiba Inus have a tendency to be motivated by only the things that interest them, which can make training with the wrong motivators a nightmare. If your Shiba doesn’t like what you have to say or what you have to offer him, he will likely turn and find something else to do, but the benefit is, you can easily tell when he is interested in something. The trick is just to find exactly what motivates your dog.

Training a Shiba to stay put when the door is open or on the off chance he escapes is important for a number of safety reasons. It can prevent him from getting hurt by another person or animal and it can keep him away from the dangers of traffic. Every dog should begin this training as early as possible and you should be prepared to dedicate anywhere between three to six months to repetition and training.

Getting Started

The most important thing you’ll need when it comes to training your Shiba is an appropriate motivator. Some dogs may be motivated by food while others will be motivated by toys. This can also be another object that your dog may enjoy such as a favorite pillow or piece of clothing. Find out what your dog obsesses over and focus on using this as a reward.

Other objects that may come in handy are indoor gates, secure outdoor fencing, a crate, and a leash. Depending on what works best for your situation, consider trying out a mixture of items for added security.

The Supervision Method

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Step
1
Watch your dog when outdoors
A great number of dogs run away simply because they are not being watched during outdoor time. Go outside with your Shiba to ensure that he is behaving and not making active efforts to escape. Bring him inside if you notice him trying to get away.
Step
2
Provide ample activity
Set out some toys or games during your outside time to keep the yard interesting. If he is invested in these items, your Shiba will be much less likely to run off.
Step
3
Offer opportunities for exploration
Take your dog out on walks often so he has a chance to explore the area that he wants to get to. If he sees daily excursions out into the neighborhood as an activity to share with you, he may not need to escape to see it by himself.
Step
4
Avoid opening the door with your dog close by
Check for your Shiba near your feet if you go to answer the front door. It’s easy to not notice when your dog is hovering around just waiting for an opportunity.
Step
5
Socialize often
Offer your dog plenty of opportunities to interact with other dogs or new people. More socialization can make strangers or other dogs walking by your home seem less of a ‘big deal’.
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The Restriction Method

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Step
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Secure your yard
Use high fencing and concrete blocks to discourage jumping or digging out in the yard. Make sure your gates are closed and there aren’t any holes for easy escapes.
Step
2
Place gates to block off entryways
Use baby gates indoors to prevent access to the front or back doors. Consider whether or not your dog is capable of leaping over them to decide if this is a good approach.
Step
3
Install a front fence
On the chance that your pup likes to bolt out the front door, it may be worth the investment of installing a front fence as an added security measure.
Step
4
Use a crate when necessary
If you have to be in and out of the home, try getting your Shiba adjusted to a crate to relax in while the chance of escape is high. This can provide a safe space for him to wait until the house is secure again.
Step
5
Designate a separate room
Place your dog into a room with a closed door for short amounts of time when necessary. Provide him some entertainment to avoid restlessness and let him out when the area is safe to do so.
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The Recall Method

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Step
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Use a reward as a lure
Use your Shiba’s best motivator to entice him to come towards you. This is usually a treat or a toy.
Step
2
Use your dog’s name once
Don’t overuse her name as you try to get her to come to you. This will generally just lead to her ignoring you. Say it once and once only. If she does not come, end the exercise and try again later with a different motivator.
Step
3
Encourage a return
Pat your legs and use a higher pitched voice to give off an inviting presence. Your dog will be more likely to come to you if you’re being friendly.
Step
4
Make recall fun
If necessary, turn recall into a game by waving around the treat or toy and running in the opposite direction. Your dog may be more likely to go to you if she thinks you’re playing a game of chase.
Step
5
Reward and practice
When she comes to you, immediately reward your Shiba with plenty of treats or her favorite toy and plenty of verbal praise and affection. Making the event seem exciting will encourage your pup to love coming to you when called. Practice with varying levels of distraction over time to prepare for any situation.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Nella
Shiba Inu mix
12 Weeks
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Question
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Nella
Shiba Inu mix
12 Weeks

I have a Shiba Inu mixed with mini Labrador. I’ve been reading horror stories about escaping Shibas, but we live in a big farm where other dogs run free all day and I would never want my dog to end up tied up all day. However there’s places to escape from all around the yard and for now she’s been loose if I’m watching, she comes when called really good for only training a week, but I definetly see some typical Shiba behaviour. When she finds something she is only interested in that, but if I go to her she never runs away and let’s me to pick her up. She’s also really friendly with other dogs and people even if she’s a little bit unsure in the beginning. How should I train her to stay around and not leave the farm area?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
77 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ninna, First of all, attach a six foot leash or longer to your dog. Do not use a retractable leash for this. You want it to be slack most of the time. Walk your dog around your property and whenever she gets within two feet of your boundary line or fence, then tell her "Out". If she moves away from the boundary line toward you, then reward her with a treat. If she crosses the boundary line, then tell her "Ah-Ah" and move between her and the fence and walk toward her until she gets away from the fence again. When she moves away from the fence, praise her but don't give her a treat. Save the treats for when she avoids the fence altogether. If you are unable to get between her and the fence with your body, then give her short quick tugs on the leash over and over again until she moves away from the fence. Praise her when she moves away from it. Practice walking the boundary line and rewarding her for avoiding the fence and correcting her by walking her out of the area or giving leash tugs when she gets too close to the boundary line. Once she will stay away from it on your walks with the leash loose, then if there are any openings in the fence like a gate or non-fenced area, then practice walking across the line and quickly turning toward her and walking her back out of the area if she tries to follow you across the boundary line. When you walk her out of the area really rush toward her and be firm about it. You do not have to act scary but be serious and quick. As she improves you can add more distractions, like running across the boundary line. If she does not follow you, then toss a treat back over to her for remaining. Once you have taught her where the boundary line is and that she is supposed to stay away from it, then if she chooses to ignore it when you are not there to enforce it, you will need to use a device. You can use a buried electric fence that corresponds to a collar that she wears. These collars are much more humane if your dog already understands what she is supposed to do and you have a more physical barrier that she can see, like a bit of a fence, so that she is only corrected for direct disobedience and not accidentally or because she does not understand. Another option is a device that produces a range and if your dog goes outside of that region, getting too far away from the device, the collar corrects your dog. Make sure that any device that transmits a signal has a large enough range for your property if you would like to give her full access to the yard. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Foxy
Shiba Inu
8 Years
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Question
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Foxy
Shiba Inu
8 Years

my dog is a rescue. I have had her for years. She was hard to train, but she is great now...lots of positive attention. She use to go everywhere with me. She use to once in awhile go to the bathroom in the back of the truck on the way to work, but not on long trips. I would tell her no and that would be the end... (I believe these were accidents). As of late she goes in the truck all the time.... It got so bad I put a crate in the truck, but she goes in the crate...Then ewe licks it up.(I do take her for walks first, since she will not go on her own without a walk, no matter how long she is outside on a run-and I do mean hours.) She can go pee several times and #2, then pees in the truck on the way home or to work. today i took her for a walk and she peed 2 times but would not go #2, then went #2 in the truck on the way in to work. I am at my end and am about to leave her home all the time witch I do not want to do since I work long hours. My husband is not impressed at all, especially since we have been taking her to work for years with few issues until now. She has always barked-squelled most of the time there and back, but this is new and I have no idea how to get her to stop making messes.???? please help if you have any ideas. Everyone at work loves her and she's great with people and walks away if she does't want to socialize... but I think that's normal for a Shiba Inu. Oh, she bark-squeales in the back of my car too, but never goes to the bathroom in my car.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
77 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nancy, It sounds like her issue might be excitement and anxiety in the car. That would cause her bowel and bladder functions to be overactive and could lead to accidents. Since it happened several times in the truck and in the crate she has likely formed an association and habit of going in there now. The first thing to do is to deal with the lingering smell that is encouraging her to go again and again in there. If you have not used a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean where she has gone before, then do that and take out mats and wash them with a detergent that contains enzymes or a spray that does. Only enzymes break down the urine and poop at a molecular level, completely removing any remaining smell. Other cleaners only remove it for our human noses and not sensitive canine ones. Look on the cleaning product bottle for the word enzyme. Avoid Ammonia containing products because Ammonia smells like urine. Once you have removed the smell you will need to spend time retraining her in the car to break the anxious mental state that is leading to accidents. At first, simply go out to the car with her with the car off and practice her Down and Stay in the back seat. If you are afraid that she will have an accident even with you there and even with the car stopped, then purchase a reusable doggie diaper, which looks like a pair boxers for dogs, and put a dog pad or a human feminine pad in it for absorption just in case. Get her familiar with wearing the diaper ahead of time and then have her wear the diaper in the car. Have her wear the diaper around the house in addition to just the car though so that it will not be sole associated with car riding and make her even more excited. You can use her dog food kibble to reward her for the Down-Stay in the car also. Practice in the car until she is calm and even bored with the car off. When she gets to that point, then turn the car on but do not go anywhere. Work on her Down-Stay with the car on until she will relax then also. For the next step you will need a second person. Have someone drive the car around the block and back home while you enforce her Down-Stay in the back seat. Do these short drive sessions until she will also stay calm during those trips. After that, gradually increase how far you go but keep the trips and destinations boring. Take a break from going to the office with her for right now if she cannot remain calm. When she can remain calm during longer trips, then practice driving to the office with her when a second person can go with you and drive. Have the other person drive and you enforce her Down-Stay and calm behavior during the trip. If she start to get worked up, then calmly but firmly give her a correction to snap her out of it. When she is calm again, then reward her very calmly with a treat and soft praise. Practicing calm behavior in the car with direct supervision so that she cannot have an accident while you are not able to interrupt her should help. The doggie diaper should prevent her from adding new urine scent to the car, which would encourage her to go there again after you have cleaned it. If you still find that she tends to work herself up while you are driving after learning to be calm, then hire a trainer who is experienced with electric stimulation collars to show you how to properly introduce, adjust, and use an electric collar with low level stimulation for correcting her state of mind in the car. Only use and e-collar after you have worked on the Down-Stay and taught her the necessary self-control and coping skills by being in the back with her though. The corrections should be for disobedience for something she is able to do, such as the Down-Stay, not something she views as random punishment because she has not been taught what to do instead. You should also only ever use an electric collar that is a high quality brand for safety reasons. Brands such as E-collar technologies, Garmin, Dogtra, or SportDog have good reputations. Cheap-quality ones can be dangerous. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bella
Shiba Inu
2 Months
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Question
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Bella
Shiba Inu
2 Months

How to we train her to sit ,stand ,not to get out

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
77 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nour, To teach Bella to Sit follow one of the methods from the article that I have linked right below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit To teach Bella how to Stand follow one of the methods from this article below. https://wagwalking.com/training/stand-1 To teach Bella not to run out the door use the "Better Inside" method or the "Stay Inside" method". You can also combine those two methods if the door that you are practicing at does not lead into a fence. The long leash attached to your dog will ensure that she cannot slip past you by accident. Pay careful attention to her. Do not let her get past you even if there is a fence. Act like you are a soccer goalie and she is the ball and the doorway is the net. Don't let the ball get through the net. Use your body to block her and walk toward her until she backs away from the door when you get to the point where you can practice this with the door wide open. When you do want her to go outside, always tell her "Okay", "Free", "Let's Go" or some other command that you choose, that means you can pass through the door. Be consistent and never let her through the door to go outside without telling her it is alright first. Otherwise she will not respect that boundary because your rule is inconsistent. Below is the article for teaching her to stay inside. https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-inside-1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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