Bacterial Kidney Infection Average Cost

From 540 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,200

Average Cost

$400

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What is Bacterial Kidney Infection?

Infections of the urinary system in cats are most often the result of bacteria entering the body. Bacteria usually enter the cat’s body through the urethra and then travel to the bladder. In some cases, the bacteria causes infection in the bladder, known as Bacterial Cystitis. The infection can move on to the kidneys and cause infection there, known as pyelonephritis. Factors that increase the risk of a urinary infection include problems with urine flow, sugar in the urine, advanced age, overly dilute urine, a compromised immune system, or comorbidity of other diseases. As cats age, kidney concerns become more common.

Symptoms of Bacterial Kidney Infection in Cats

In many cases, a cat does not exhibit symptoms until the infection is advanced. The greatest risk factor for kidney infection in your cat is that your cat will experience  kidney failure. A change in your cat’s urination habits may be a red flag for some type of kidney problem. If your cat seems to be spending too much time in the litter box or has urine accidents outside of the litter box, a urinary tract infection may be to blame. Symptoms to be aware of include: 

  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Excessive urination or difficulty urinating 
  • Blood in urine
  • Foul-smelling urine
  • Discolored Urine
  • Abdominal or lower back pain

Causes of Bacterial Kidney Infection in Cats

Your veterinarian may not be able to pinpoint a specific cause of your cat’s kidney bacterial infection. In general, elderly cats and very young kittens are the most susceptible due to weakened or compromised immune systems. Other causes of pyelonephritis may include:

  • Stones in the kidney or ureter that prevent urine from flowing normally
  • Birth defects in young kittens, such as ectopic ureter (ureter bypasses the bladder and enters the urethra from outside the bladder wall)
  • Ureteral movement
  • A restriction in the blood supply to the kidneys or flap valves between the kidneys and ureter
  • An infection in the blood that spreads into the urinary tract/kidneys
  • Blockages in the urinary tract can cause sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood) or urosepsis (infection of blood from decomposed urine being forced into blood stream)

Diagnosis of Bacterial Kidney Infection in Cats

Pyelonephritis is hard to diagnose and difficult to treat. Your veterinarian will perform a complete physical examination and run a series of blood tests to diagnose the bacterial infection. The blood work will include a chemical profile and blood count as well as testing levels of potassium and phosphorus. Urine tests will also be run and will include urinalysis, bacterial culture testing and an electrolyte panel. In severe cases, contrast x-rays or ultrasound may be required. Other procedures in severe cases may include urine cultures obtained from the renal pelvis of your cat or a renal biopsy as a last resort. If your cat has kidney stones, an incision into the kidney may be needed to acquire some of the mineral content of the stone for analysis.

Be prepared to share with your veterinarian the symptoms you have observed and approximately how long that you have noticed the symptoms. Do not delay contacting your veterinarian as the bacterial infection can lead to kidney failure if not promptly treated. A bacterial kidney infection can cause permanent damage or can be fatal without proper treatment.

Treatment of Bacterial Kidney Infection in Cats

Bacterial infections of the urinary tract need to be properly treated. Your cat can develop a resistance to antibiotics which can lead to infection that cannot be cleared up. Untreated bacterial infections in the bladder can lead to the more serious condition of kidney infection.

Treatment of kidney bacterial infection in your cat usually requires a long term antibiotic regime for four to six weeks. If you cat has become dehydrated, IV fluids may be required. Surgery may be required is there is an obstruction in the urinary tract. If your cat has kidney stones, they may need to be surgically removed or dissolved through shockwave treatments. Kidney stones can sometimes be alleviated through diet.

Recovery of Bacterial Kidney Infection in Cats

Full recovery of kidney function is possible, depending on the amount of damage to the kidneys. Your veterinarian will perform follow-up urinalysis and cultures after treatment has begun and at the end of the antibiotic regimen. A special diet that is low in protein and low in phosphorus may be recommended. Due to the frequent occurrence of kidney problems in older cats, regular blood and urine screenings are recommended after your cat reaches 7 years of age. 

Be sure to administer medications as prescribed by your veterinarian and keep all follow-up appointments. Do not hesitate to contact your veterinarian with any questions or concerns. Call your veterinarian’s office if your cat does not appear to be responding to the treatment, continues to be lethargic or is not eating or drinking. 

For home management, provide multiple litter boxes in your home. A rule of thumb is one more litter box than the number of cats you have in your home. Encourage your cat to drink water and provide water sources throughout your home. Giving your cat canned food can increase his water intake. Prescription diet food may contain essential fatty acids and antioxidants to help maintain a healthy urinary tract.

Bacterial Kidney Infection Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Cassie
domestic short hair
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

12 hours of treatment little change

Not eating or drinking, lethargic. Took her to vet and blood work revealed high kidney levels and dehydration. Would not say definitively what the problem was but was leaning towards kidney infection. Started IV fluids and drugs for 24 hours. Can not afford continued vet treatment. Is there anything that can be done at home?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Kidney disease in cats needs very aggressive IV fluid therapy, and always has a guarded prognosis for improvement. 24 hours may not be enough time for treatment, unfortunately. I'm sorry that that is happening to Cassie. Many clinics offer CareCredit to help with unexpected expenses, if that is an option with your clinic.

Had a similar situation with sick kitty and limited funds. He had a 24 hours of IV fluids, then did Sub Q at home, but could tell he needed more IV hydration. We compromised and had IV catheter placed and he got IV fluids at the vet during the day. We took him home, flushed IV before bed and first thing in the morning, then took him back to vet for IV fluids. Over the three days he got another 24 hours of IV fluids.

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Nicholas
American Shorthair
19 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My cat has recently been diagnosed with Kidney disease and was doing good on a supplement my vet prescribed. Then in the last month he got a very dark red coloring near his nipple area and between the pads of his feet and would swell up in different parts of his body. He even had some patches that looked dark purple in color. He's quiet and doesnt like to move around too much. His blood tests came back normal and my vet put him on an anti-inflammatory and it lowered the swelling but that's it(been 4 days) He's not in pain and can still jump and walk. I'm stumped...any ideas what it could be?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Four days is still early in the treatment of inflammation and you should give it at least seven or ten days before drawing a conclusion, especially if you are seeing some improvement. The swelling may not be related to the kidney issues and since it is on the lower side of the body may be attributable to an allergen or something Nicholas walked in. I would give the antiinflammatory time to work and see what happens over the next week or so. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Paulina
Brown tabby cat
12 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Medication Used

Tramadol

My cat Paulina has been peeing blood, not eating, and she has lost a ton of weight. She used to drink tons of water but now she just hangs her head over the bowl and doesn't drink any at all. We took her to the vet and they did a blood test and perscribed some medicine. After a few days they determined she had a kidney infection. Paulina is 12 years old, and the treatment is said to be around $800 and we have already payed $500 to find out what it was and for some medication. The vet recommends that we choose either the treatment or to put her down because she is in pain ... what do you think would be the best option? I really want to treat her but because she is old we are debating if it is worth it

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
This is a decision which you need to make yourself, I haven’t examined Paulina so I cannot determine the severity of her condition; your Veterinarian would have given you are options and you need to make a decision based on how you feel about it and what you feel (more importantly) is best for Paulina. These decisions are never easy, but you should discuss with your Veterinarian about their opinion on quality of life after treatment or if based on Paulina’s condition further treatment is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I'm experiencing this same thing now and I literally saved her life here at home. I ordered amoxicillin for fish and started her on those 2x day. but most importantly I saved her life by having a little dropper like with baby medicine and fed her chicken soup broth several times daily,as well as water forcefully if need be. but that's not all. I also did this with pedia lite for babies to keep them hydrated. I also bought cranberry tablets that I melted and mashed up with water and also have her some of that 2x a day too. it's takes lots of time, I mean lots but it's worth saving your kitties life without going to a vet or if you can't afford it. I saved her from death by doing this and 3 weeks later she jumping around and playing again now. also offer as much wet food and tuna often till they begin to eat. it took my baby 6 days till she would eat again, she lost all her weight and lots of hair. but they can be saved at home if you are dedicated and have the time to do it.

Also she has been perscribed tramadol and zeniquin

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Bill
tabby
10 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating Outside Litterbox

why is My kitten of 10months old who is getting over a kidney infection is not using litterbox that is clean Litterbox. It wants to use the floor outside his box. He has had a kidney infection and on an antibiotic for 21 days. Has been seen by my vet 2 times. It has lose stool and urineates on the floor

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Urinating outside of the litter tray may be a behavioural issue and not an actual medical issue; it is possible that Bill is associating the litter tray with pain or discomfort so is reluctant to use the litter tray. You should place him in the tray when he tries to urinate to try to get him to learn to do it there. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Bill will not drink water out of a water bowl that is attached to his food bowl. He will drink out of a separate bowl though. Why does he do that behavior?

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Tk
domestic short hair
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

cry
trying to urinate
Urinating Outside Litterbox
Throwing up

I have exhausted every option I was told about, including carecredit, scratchpay, and financial assistance programs. I can't get my cat to a vet until Friday morning when my paycheck comes through to my account. My male cat is crying trying to pee and i havent seen him actually get anything out since last night about 10 hours ago. He threw up this morning and I am terrified that he has a blockage. Is there absolutely anything I can do at home until I have the ways to get him to the vet?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
There is absolutely nothing that you can do at home for this problem, and TK is suffering terribly if he has a urinary blockage. The kindest thing that you may be able to do for him is to take him to a veterinarian and sign ownership over so that they can humanely euthanize him. That sounds very harsh, I know, but a urinary blockage is a terrible way to die, and it is fatal if not treated. I genuinely hope that something else is going on with him, but he needs help immediately. If you can get friends or family to help, he may have options.

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Waffles
American Shorthair
20 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urinary tract infection

Medication Used

Clavamox antibiotic- oral

I took my (elderly) cat to the emergency vet 8 days ago because she was seeming thinner, straining to pee (and frequently), some of the urine was red-tinged, she was excessively grooming her genitals, and was meowing a lot. They did a urinalysis and the next day (~24 hours later), they confirmed it was a UTI, prescribed clavamox, and ordered a culture to make sure clavamox was the correct antibiotic. She's now 1/2 done with 2 weeks of antibiotics and seems to be doing better - no more straining to pee frequently, no more peeing in inappropriate places, and she even seems to have put on a little weight. Her behaviors even seem better. But it turns out the lab never did the culture. Is there any reason to do it now, when we'd get the results back when she's almost done with the two week antibiotic course, or is it better to just wait to the end to do another urinalysis to see if that cleared it up? Also, they never did blood work to see if it went to her kidneys, but if it did, would the urinalysis at the end still show signs of an infection or is a metabolic panel still necessary because the infection is no longer in her urinary tract?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
At this point, it may be worth waiting for the course of antibiotics to end and then doing urinalysis to see if there are any signs of infection; improvement is a good sign, but we still see improvement in cases where the infection is only suppressed but not cured. Given Waffles age, I would finish this course of antibiotics and then revisit your Veterinarian for another urinalysis and if there is still an infection proceed with the culture and sensitivity testing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tigress
dsh
20 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

My cat is elderly 20 years and has been healthy her whole life, and has stopped eating for two days, but is drinking a lot. This cat normally pees a lot, but with decreased eating her output has also decreased. She started drinking for 5 minutes at a time today and has done it twice since 9 pm last night. Is this an infection or Kidney Disease?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It could be one, both or another condition; in older cats there are many different conditions which may affect them including kidney disease, liver disease, gastrointestinal disorders, hormonal disorders, infections among other causes. If Tigress is not eating, the increased water consumption may be due to a reduction in water intake from wet food. I would suggest if she is not eating still by Monday to visit your Veterinarian for an examination, urinalysis and blood test (at her age a blood test would just be useful overall). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Simon
short hair
8 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

excessive urination

Medication Used

Clavamox antibiotic- oral

My 8 year old has been excessively drinking and peeing. A urine test showed high levels of bacteria. Was put on clavamox for 2 Improved but within 24 hours symptoms returned. Went back for another urine and bacteria is back. Was told to stop antibiotics for 5 days to get a needle extraction to pinpoint exact bacteria. Is this sound advice? To wait 5 days without anything sounds painful.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
I think that your veterinarian is trying to get an accurate urine sample to send off for culture, and Simon does have to be off of antibiotics for a period of time to have relevant test results. It may be worth having some lab work done as well if blood work wasn't done, to make sure that his kidneys aren't the source of the problem. Once they get the needle sample, he can be put back on Clavamox, if that helped, until the actual results come in - the antibiotic may change at that point, but if the Clavamox makes him more comfortable, there isn't anything wrong with doing that.

Thank you. Blood work came back normal. Is the excesive drinking, like 4 cups a day and urine like a weeks worth in a day, normal with a bacterial infection? I feel so badly for him.

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Lava
Tabby
6 Years
Mild condition
-1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None. Diagnosed during regular check
Frequent Urination
Urinating
Urinating Outside Litterbox

After 2 1/2 weeks of antibiotic treatment (0.5 ml of Veraflox orally) for a UTI, our cat's urine was taken via cystocentesis with these applicable results:
White Blood Cells: "0-2" (before antibiotics "10-15")
Bacteria: "Moderate (9-40/HPF)" (before antibiotics "Marked >40/HPF")
Red Blood Cells: ">100" (before antibiotics "30-50")

Is it possible the red blood cells could be from a bad sample?
Does it mean our cat needs to have urine taken from her kidneys or should we just use a different antibiotic? Is there another treatment that does not use antibiotics? Our cat has a sensitive stomach.

By the way, our cat has a good appetite. She just urinates and defecates outside of the litter box often.

We are frustrated about whether we are doing the right treatment. Looks like the antibiotic did not work. Please help.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

It looks like the antibiotics helped against the infection, but didn’t eliminate it. The breakdown of urinalysis results are white blood cells now 0-2 (down from 10-15), the normally less than 5; bacteria 9-40 (before more than 40), should be sterile if taken by cystocentesis; red blood cells more than 100 (30-50 before), should be less than 5; the reduction in white blood cells and possible reduction in bacteria shows that the antibiotics did something, just didn’t completely cure the infection, the high presence of red blood cells was probably due to the cystocentesis which can be difficult to do. You would still need an antibiotic to treat the infection, speak with your Veterinarian about using a different antibiotic and possible sensitivity testing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Appreciate the information

Can too many antibiotic shots for UTI infection in cats destroyed your kidneys

Is it possible for a cat to recover from kidney infection with a creatinine of 10.2 and BUN 230?

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Fenel
Main Coon
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Dehydration,lose weigh,high BUN

Medication Used

ampicillin-bicomplex.anti prasite.

Hello,2 months ago i took my cat to my friends house for 5 days and she didn't eat food like before and became depressed and vomited some worms.
the vet checked her and took blood test,she has high BUN and ceratenine,dehydrated body and high WBC and RBC.
we tried serum therapy for a month and the result became less BUN and ceratenine,and use antibiotic(Ampicillin)for 10 days and anti parasite for 3 days.we did sonography from her kidney (the size of them were normal ) and checked FIV and FELV kit both of them were negative.
4 doctor visit her but no one knows her problem ,she is too weak (less than 2 kilos ) now and cant walk ,her stool is dark and her eyes are become strange.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what the specific cause of the increased white blood cells, red blood cells, BUN and creatinine are; however infections, inflammatory disease and autoimmune diseases are possibilities. Dietary management is a good starting point if not done already ensuring that Fenel is on a low quantity but high quality protein diet and received plenty of fluids. Further testing may be useful including a kidney needle aspirate to see the types of cells present. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for answering.
She used to eat renal food,but unfortunately she doesn't eat now And because of losing weigh we can’t continue serum teraphy ( she hasn’t acceptable blood vessel ). What should I do now ? She is not well at all

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Marley
short haired
20 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My cat has been peeing in her sleep. She’s not experiencing any pain. In the past she has had painful urination on and off. When it’s painful I’ve taken her to the vet. They’ve given her an antibiotic shot and it goes away. I’m thinking I should probably take her to the vet again. She’s had 2 shots this year.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
There are various different causes for urination while sleeping and may be just age related incontinence, however without examining Marley I cannot say for certain. You should return to your Veterinarian for urinalysis and treatment as required, I cannot confirm if this is due to another infection or something else. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Emrys
dsh
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate

Hi! My cat was diagnosed with a UTI on Monday and we were sent home with antibiotics and muscle relaxers. He initially seemed to be getting better with little to know straining. He has had 5 doses of both the antibiotic and muscle relaxers but he seems to be dping worse (more painful sounding meows, increased frequency again to LB with only tiny droplets,). Do i take him back in or wait one more day for his antibiotics to kick in?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Urinary infections in lame cats can cause urinary blockages, unfortunately. If Emrys is straining to urinate, crying, and passing only small amounts of urine, this is an emergency, and he should be seen right away to make sure that he is not experiencing a blockage. I hope that he is okay.

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