Carprofen Poisoning Average Cost

From 34 quotes ranging from $300 - 2,500

Average Cost

$500

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What is Carprofen Poisoning?

Carprofen is a medication commonly prescribed to canines with osteoarthritis; it works well for pain management and is very palatable making it a medicine well suited for canine ailments. The positive results seen by pet owners who give this medicine to their dogs regularly is well documented. The anti-inflammatory properties of this drug are also known to be beneficial. Many canines are prescribed carprofen long-term, though patients on this medication must be followed by the veterinarian to monitor the effects of the drug. Carprofen has caused toxicity in dogs who have been on the medication long-term; however, cases of poisoning are most commonly seen with an accidental overdose of the medication. Our canine companions enjoy the flavor of this medication and will help themselves to it if available. Symptoms will vary depending on the amount consumed and can range from vomiting to abdominal pain, and gastrointestinal perforation in very severe cases.

Carprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in the veterinary field for pain management. Prescribed as a medication to alleviate inflammation and pain associated with arthritis, as well as pain management after surgery, ingestion of more than the prescribed amount can result in serious consequences.

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Symptoms of Carprofen Poisoning in Dogs

The severity of signs of carprofen poisoning will be contingent on how much of the medication was ingested by your pet. The peak plasma concentration (the highest level of medication in the blood) is reached in one to three hours.  Symptoms you may see in your dog will vary.

  • Vomiting (can be bloody)
  • Diarrhea (can be bloody)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Muscle twitching

In severe cases, additional signs will be seen.

  • Tremors
  • Seizures
  • Gastrointestinal perforation
  • Stupor
  • Coma

Signs of kidney failure are as follows.

  • * Blood in the urine
  • Extreme thirst
  • Excessive urination
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting

In addition, if the liver is experiencing damage, jaundice will be present in the form of yellow colored skin, mucus membranes, and whites of the eyes.

Types

Carprofen poisoning in dogs can be acute after the ingestion of a large qunatity over and above the prescribed amount. Chronic carprofen poisoning may result if your dog develops a sensitivity to it over a period of time. There are side effects and possible adverse reactions to carprofen in some canines, this is why a dog who is on a regular prescription will be monitored through regular check-ups with the veterinarian.

Causes of Carprofen Poisoning in Dogs

Although adverse reactions to the drug are rare, ingestion of high amounts due to a canine gaining access to his medicinal supply is common. NSAID’s in general can be responsible for gastrointestinal issues with long-term use; therefore, an overdose of a chewable tablet or capsule will cause your pet to experience stomach upset in mild cases, to gastrointestinal irritation or perforation in severe cases of poisoning. Reduction of gastric acid secretion and blood flow to the mucosa can occur causing hemorrhaging along with kidney and liver failure. Other risk factors for severe carprofen poisoning can be:

  • Dogs with coagulation disorders such as von Willebrand’s disease
  • Other medication that is prescribed concurrently like glucocorticoids and sulfonamides
  • Dehydration
  • Predisposition to liver and kidney disease
  • Compromised liver and kidney due to age

Diagnosis of Carprofen Poisoning in Dogs

If you have witnessed your pet indulging in his carprofen tablets, do not question or wait for the result. A visit to the veterinary clinic is essential. Bring the empty packaging with you, along with any other medications your pet may be on (if any). The veterinarian will base his diagnostic decisions on clinical signs exhibited by your dog (like nausea and abdominal pain) and will also rely on information you can provide. The veterinarian may ask questions as he examines your pet’s mucus membranes and eyes and takes his vital signs.

  • How long has your pet been on the carprofen?
  • What is the reason is it was prescribed?
  • How long ago did you realize that he may have ingested an overdose amount?
  • What have the symptoms been so far?
  • Are they getting worse as time progresses or staying at the same intensity?
  • How much is he drinking and urinating?

The veterinary team will take blood tests in the form of a complete blood count and blood serum chemistry to evaluate levels such as BUN (blood urea nitrogen), creatinine, electrolytes, and liver enzymes. A urinalysis will determine the concentration or dilution of the urine.

Treatment of Carprofen Poisoning in Dogs

Decontamination

Depending on the timing between ingestion and hospitalization, the veterinary team may choose to induce vomiting and administer active charcoal (to bind the remaining medication).

Supportive Care

IV fluids will provide much supportive and corrective care. Nausea medication, antibiotics, gastroprotectants, vitamin K1 for the liver, and diazepam if there are seizures can all be administered during supportive therapy. Kidney and liver function, as well as urine outflow, will be assisted through intravenous fluids. Your furry family member will be monitored carefully and will remain in the hospital as needed until blood levels are normal and organ function has returned.

Recovery of Carprofen Poisoning in Dogs

Studies show that cases of carprofen poisoning in dogs can have a good prognosis with timely medical intervention. If there has been severe kidney or liver damage or if the ulceration and hemorrhaging in the gastrointestinal tract and stomach are extremely damaging, the chances of recovery become guarded. If your pet is able to return home after treatment, he may require special care and will need a follow-up appointment with the veterinarian to re-evaluate with blood tests. As with all other types of medication, carprofen should be kept out of reach of children and pets.

Carprofen Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Jake
Jack Russell
15 Years
Fair condition
2 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My 20 lb, 15 yr old Jack Russel mix got into his bottle of Rimadyl while I was at work. I don’t know how many were in the bottle but at most there were 7 75-mg tablets. He could have done this anytime in the last 12 hours (my guess is earlier vs later in the day). He’s not showing any symptoms and is eating, drinking, and pottying normally. Are we out of the woods?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Symptoms of carprofen (Rimadyl) poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, bloody vomit, black-tarry stool, loss of appetite, lethargy, increased urination or thirst, abdominal pain as well as seizures or death in severe cases; I would take Jake into see your Veterinarian to be on the safe side as some serious symptoms may take time to present so it would be useful to have a once over to be cautious along with some fluid therapy if required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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GRYFF
Jack Russell Terrier
18 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Sleepy

My 18 pound Jack Russell was prescribed caprofen 75mg, to be given 1/4 of a pill twice a day as needed. I accidentally gave him his first dosage as a full pill in one sitting. He hasn't shown any symptoms other than being a bit sleepy. I realized my mistake 5 hours after giving him the medicine. Should I take him to the vet?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
a 4X dosage of Carprofen may not cause problems if given once, but may cause GI ulceration or kidney damage. To be careful, it would be a good idea to have him on IV fluid therapy and stomach protectants for 48 hours, and have his kidney values checked to make sure that he is okay. I hope that all goes well for Gryff.

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Harley
Labrador Retriever
5 Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

Medication Used

Carprofen

My lab is only 5 years old and was prescribed Carprofen for his back pain a month ago. Today, he is fighting for lis life and is told only has weeks to live because of kidney failure. Could the Carprofen be the cause of this. He is still in critical care and has been for 5 days. His creatine live went from 10- 9- 9.6 in those 5 days. I am so at a lost at how this could happen. The carprofen is the only think I can think of.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
At a normal dosage in a perfectly otherwise healthy dog (apart from the back pain) it is unlikely that carprofen (Rimadyl) would cause kidney failure although it is possible, just unlikely; toxicity can be expected when doses over five times the normal dose are given. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I am currently enduring the same ordeal with my Corgi. Except this happened much quicker. He went into the vet for hip pain and was prescribed Rimadyl. Two weeks later he is dying of liver and kidney failure. Did Harley make it out of this? If so, how?

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Kenz
Puggle
8 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

none

I accidentally gave my dog an extra dose of Rimadyl. She gets 1/2 every 12 hours, they are 75mg. She had one at 8:00am, 5:30pm, and 10:30pm. She is a 30-34lb puggle. Will she be ok?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Rimadyl (carprofen) is tested at one, three and five times the recommended dose, when administered at five times the recommended dose there are no significant adverse reactions. Keep an eye on Kenz and continue the course of treatment the next day as usual, if you notice any symptoms on this page visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM “In target animal safety studies, Rimadyl was administered orally to healthy Beagle dogs at 1, 3, and 5 mg/lb twice daily (1, 3 and 5 times the recommended total daily dose) for 42 consecutive days with no significant adverse reactions” www.rimadyl.com/pdf/rimadyl_injectable_pi.pdf

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Artoo
Australian Cattle
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

I gave my 38 lb blue heeler a 75mg carprofen last night as prescribed at 7:30pm. As all his other pills are to be taken every 12 hours, I gave him another one this morning at 8 am. I realized after that he should only get one every 24 hours. Is this something I should be concerned about? I'm worndering if this warrants a vet visit or just to keep a close eye on him and only give it every 24 hours from now on.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
That one time dosage should not cause any toxic effects if Artoo is otherwise in good health. In the short term, it would be best to monitor him for any signs of vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance, or lethargy, and have him seen if he is having any of these problems. Otherwise, he should be able to get the next appropriate dosage 24 hours after the last dose.

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Izzy
Black Lab
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

none

One of my 4 dogs got into a bottle of carprofen while we were not home. I am not really sure which dog it was. All of the dogs are relativley large, the smallest being 50-60 lbs. The bottle had about forty-two 100mg tablets in it. They had to of gotten into the bottle 2-3 hours ago. I have not noticed any symptoms since I found the empty bottle. Do you think they will be okay?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Carprofen (Rimadyl) is toxic in dogs in large amounts over 40mg/kg, given the number of tablets possibly consumed between one or all of the dogs you should visit an Emergency Veterinarian immediately for an examination and fluid therapy to prevent kidney damage as well as getting medication to support the liver and other supportive and symptomatic care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/carprofen/ http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/toxicology-brief-managing-acute-carprofen-toxicosis-dogs-and-cats www.rimadyl.com/pdf/rimadyl_injectable_pi.pdf

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Duke
Bassett Hound
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

listlessness

Hello, I have an 88pound Bassett Hound Duke. Well Duke just had surgery where he had 2 separate masses removed. He was given 100mg Carprofen. Once daily. This evening between myself and my husband he accidentally was given 3 pills instead of one. Will he be okay?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. The high dosage of Carprofen in dogs is 2 mg/ kg, or 80 mg once a day. Given that Duke received 3-4 times his recommended dosage of Carprofen, it would be best to have him seen by your veterinarian in the morning, to check some lab work, decide if he needs IV fluids for kidney function, or stomach protectants for his GI tract. I hope that he is okay.

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Annabelle
Collie, Rough
6 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

Our 80lb rough collie ate a full bottle (60 tablets, brand new bottle) of 75mg Rimadyl. We know exactly how long she could have eaten them, max was 115 minutes between the time she was administered Apomorphine and vomiting was induced. She was transferred to an ICU within 3 hours of initial ingestion. They continued with the activated charcoal protocol, and administered an iv fluids program to flush her kidneys and help get the liver cleaned up from the charcoal (or thats my understanding anyway). At approximately 24 hours after the initial entry to the ICU, she started having full body tremors. I believe at that point, the ICU staff attributed it to excess sodium. As the day rolled into the next day, the tremors stopped but they were still measuring extremely high sodium levels. BUN and Creatinine were very high. By Day 3, BUN and Creatinine and the liver enzymes were all down to normal, but the small seizures still happened. We're on day 5 at this point. We know her brain is the only hold-out now, but what I'm trying to understand is how high sodium levels can cause full body tremors - I suspect the tremors were not just tremors but were also seizures. Can you explain why sodium levels would be elevated enough to trigger brain damage? We think at this point, she's probably not going to pull through enough to regain any degree of mobility or cognitive function. Annabelle is 6 years old and was in excellent health prior to this issue.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm so sorry that that happened to Annabelle, and to you. That is a very tragic accident. Extremely high sodium levels can decrease physiologic levels of fluid to the organs, including the brain, as the salt draws water to the bloodstream and away from the tissues. It essentially dehydrates the brain, and unless enough IV fluid therapy can be given to provide those cells with essential fluid, they will die. With acute kidney failure, the profound increase in urination as the kidneys lose control can cause that dramatic increase in sodium. I am sending all possible hope to you that she will recover this devastating event.

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Rosco
French Bulldog
12 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

none

My dog is getting this pill for 3 days every 12 hours . It's 25mg and he only gets 1/2 of one every 12 hours . But my husband accidentally gave it to him 2 hours early will he be okay ? What should we do ? He only ways 10 pounds

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. A 2 hour difference should not cause any ill effects for him. Monitor for signs of GI upset, including vomiting, diarrhea, or a decreased appetite, and have him seen if any of those are occurring, but it is likely that he will be fine. I hope everything goes well for Rosco!

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Bronco
Mutt
4 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing Difficulties

Medication Used

Carprofen

I my dog was prescribed 5 tablets of carprophen and my other dog jumped on the counter and ate the remamining 3 while I was at work. He's not acting any differently for the past few hours. Will he be ok?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Without knowing the dose of each tablet or Bronco’s weight I cannot say for certain that there will not be any problems, but you should call your Veterinarian to get another course of carprofen and discuss Bronco. Mainly vomiting and diarrhoea are the most common symptoms but without more information I cannot give further advice. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/carprofen/

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Simba
Labrador Retriever
11 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Vomiting

Medication Used

Truprofen

My 1 year old, 60lbs Lab was prescribed 50mg of Truprofen. We gave him 1 dose yesterday (Friday) night, and within 30 minutes he was throwing up. We found most of the pill in the vomit, but since then he's continued vomiting and had diarrhea. He seemed to be doing better this morning and was moving around fine and playing with his red ball, so we cautiously fed him ~1 cup of food at noon. About 2 hours later he threw that up, and parts of it were pink. We're not sure if it's blood or if it was from something else he ate. It's now 5pm on Saturday and the vet is closed. Is there anything at this point we can do? Is it late enough that activated carbon wouldn't help?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Vomiting and diarrhea are an occasional side effect of Carprofen. If your veterinarian is closed, and he seems bright and happy at this point, a 12 hour fast sometimes helps settle their stomachs after something like this happens. If you feed him after 12 hours and he continues to vomit or have diarrhea, or he is becoming more lethargic or isn't interested in food, he should be seen as soon as possible to be evaluated and possibly given a medication to settle his intestinal tract down. I hope that everything goes well for Simba.

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Poppy
Labrador Retriever
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine

Medication Used

Carprofen

My dog was prescribed carprofen and now has blood in her urine, and urinating more frequently. I am stopping the medication is there something else I can do. Otherwise she seems fine

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Blood in the urine is one uncommon side effect of carprofen, so it is good that you stopped it. Other side effects include stomach or intestinal ulcers, so it would be a good idea to watch for any vomiting or diarrhea. If she was prescribed that medication for a painful condition, she may need an alternative drug to help her with that, and I would keep in mind that blood in the urine is a less common side effect, so may be unrelated to the drug, and monitor her for continued frequent urination or blood, as she may have a urinary problem. If she does vomit, have diarrhea, or continue to have frequent or bloody urination, she should have a recheck with her veterinarian.

I just reasantlylost my pit he was givin deramax for his bad hip. Then we ran out he was in discomfort over christmas so called emergancy clinic told them we were iut of deramax. They said its ok we will give you carprofen give it to him every 12 hrs 75mg rusting in them we did. Mean while we ordered deamax from heartland vets it got list in mail. All of a sudden my best friend was not eatting very lethargic white gums and blowted stomic with in 6 days new years day i took him to emg clinic were i was told he was bleed ing to the spleen . And removing it was coastly and not much of a survival rate blood trans 20 per chance needless to say my baby was bleeding to death. All they could say was it was a coincidence when i looked up mixing deramax followered by carprofen with no brake in between there a great side effects there should be at least 10 days well you beleave in your vets and i was never told this at all. Full worning do not us eaither. Phizer drug reps should inform vets more on this
I lost a part of my family and all they can say is im sorry for your loss instead of blaming the drug and giving to him with out imforming me.

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Hp
Beagle Harrier
11 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

Hello! I am reaching out for help. The vet prescribed my 38 lb 11 year old beagle 1/2 a 75mg tablet every 12 hrs. He ate a whole one for his first dose. What should i do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Carprofen (Rimadyl) may be administered as 1mg/lb twice per day or 2mg/lb once per day; I would not expect to see any adverse effects from taking the whole day dose at once compared with dividing it every twelve hours. Continue tomorrow with the divided dose as per your Veterinarian’s instructions. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jabez & Asher
Lab Pei
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My labs ate at 6:30 this morning. At 7 I found one with a rimadyl bottle chewed up and empty. There were aprox 6-7 100mg chews. My labs are about 100 lbs. I’m not sure which ate them or if they shared. Would it be a toxic amount if one ate them all?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Rimadyl (carprofen) has been tested in dogs at up to 10mg/lb twice per day which is more than Jabez or Asher would have consumed if they eat them alone (around 7mg/lb); the results of the safety study indicate that there would be little to be concerned about and that there may be some black tarry stool. You should visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side if you notice any symptoms and if you have activated charcoal, give it to them. An excerpt from the prescribing information is below along with a link the the document. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM “In target animal safety studies, Rimadyl was administered orally to healthy Beagle dogs at 1, 3, and 5 mg/lb twice daily (1, 3 and 5 times the recommended total daily dose) for 42 consecutive days with no significant adverse reactions. Serum albumin for a single female dog receiving 5 mg/lb twice daily decreased to 2.1 g/dL after 2 weeks of treatment, returned to the pre-treatment value (2.6 g/dL) after 4 weeks of treatment, and was 2.3 g/dL at the final 6-week evaluation. Over the 6-week treatment period, black or bloody stools were observed in 1 dog (1 incident) treated with 1 mg/lb twice daily and in 1 dog (2 incidents) treated with 3 mg/lb twice daily. Redness of the colonic mucosa was observed in 1 male that received 3 mg/lb twice daily. Two of 8 dogs receiving 10 mg/lb orally twice daily (10 times the recommended total daily dose) for 14 days exhibited hypoalbuminemia. The mean albumin level in the dogs receiving this dose was lower (2.38 g/dL) than each of 2 placebo control groups (2.88 and 2.93 g/dL, respectively). Three incidents of black or bloody stool were observed in 1 dog. Five of 8 dogs exhibited reddened areas of duodenal mucosa on gross pathologic examination. Histologic examination of these areas revealed no evidence of ulceration, but did show minimal congestion of the lamina propria in 2 of the 5 dogs. In separate safety studies lasting 13 and 52 weeks, respectively, dogs were administered orally up to 11.4 mg/lb/day (5.7 times the recommended total daily dose of 2 mg/lb) of carprofen. In both studies, the drug was well tolerated clinically by all of the animals. No gross or histologic changes were seen in any of the treated animals.” www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/Products/ApprovedAnimalDrugProducts/DrugLabels/UCM050406.pdf (see under animal safety)

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Freckles
Australian Shepherd
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

I have a 13 yr old full blooded Australian Shepherd. the vet gave us carprofen to give to her twice a day 50 mg each. After 3 doses she had a bad seizure we didn't realize it was the medicine and continued to give it to her for another 2 1/2 days. She had 8 50mg pills in all.It has now been 3 1/2 days since her last dose and she is still having at least 5 seizures a day basically anytime she gets up to walk she has a seizure and losses her bladder. She doesn't drink and she was drinking up to 4 bowls of water a day. She just lays around and doesn't move at all. Is there any hope she will recover from this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
At therapeutic doses the side effects and adverse reactions to carprofen (Rimadyl) are minimal and usually comprise gastrointestinal symptoms associated with long term use; seizures are a rare reaction to carprofen and should improve. If you haven’t already, you should consult with your Veterinarian regarding supportive and symptomatic care during this time as well as alternative medications. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Oscar
Chihuahua
8 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

Last year, I gave my dog Rimadyl that was prescribed to another dog. I had good intentions of helping him with pain, but I now blame myself for his death. He was 12 lbs., and I gave him a total of 50mg in four small pieces within 24 hours. A little over 24 hours after I had given him the last small piece, he began having seizures. I took him to the ER and told them what I had done. He had also recently been on Prednisone before I gave him the Rimadyl and was given 2 injections the day after I had given it to him. He was being treated for a slow gate. The ER vet reprimanded me for giving him the medicine. She called the poison control and they said it didn't sound like a toxic issue, but something neurological. They kept my dog for about 10 hours and administered medicines. He continued to have the seizures and I ended up having to euthanize him. I cannot forgive myself for what happened. My vet told me that I did not cause his death, but I still believe I did. He had written possible brain lesion in his file while he was being treated prior to his death, but I still believe I caused my dog's death. I beat myself up over and over for what I did. Did I cause the death of my dog? How can I forgive myself?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2485 Recommendations
Firstly, I know that you gave Oscar Rimadyl (carprofen) with the best intentions, but there is a reason why there are prescription medicines, over the counter medicines and why Veterinarians have crippling student loan debt; many times unintentional poisoning, overdose or adverse reaction by an owner giving a medication prescribed to one dog to other. From your description I do not believe you contributed directly to Oscar’s death as you gave (4mg/lb) two times the recommended dose (2mg/lb); whilst animal safety studies have shown that dogs can tolerate doses higher than you gave over a long period of time, below is an excerpt from the prescribing information: “In separate safety studies lasting 13 and 52 weeks, respectively, dogs were administered orally up to 11.4 mg/lb/day (5.7 times the recommended total daily dose of 2 mg/lb) of carprofen. In both studies, the drug was well tolerated clinically by all of the animals. No gross or histologic changes were seen in any of the treated animals. In both studies, dogs receiving the highest doses had average increases in serum L-alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of approximately 20 IU. In the 52-week study, minor dermatologic changes occurred in dogs in each of the treatment groups but not in the control dogs. The changes were described as slight redness or rash and were diagnosed as non-specific dermatitis. The possibility exists that these mild lesions were treatment related, but no dose relationship was observed.” www.rimadyl.com/content/DisplayPDF.pdf?docName=RIM016007.pdf It is possible that Oscar has a preexisting condition which presented itself around the same time as the Rimadyl administration, I cannot say for certain what the cause was; I would have recommended a necropsy to determine the cause of death to help understand this situation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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