Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract Average Cost

From 452 quotes ranging from $200 - 500

Average Cost

$350

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What is Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract?

Many cases of cystitis can be easily corrected by current treatment methods. In cases where blockages are involved, more invasive methods, such as surgery, may need to be performed. In rare cases, such infections can be a signal of a more serious condition, such as cancer, bladder or renal disease.

Cystitis, or an infection of the bladder and urinary tract, is a very common occurrence in rabbits. Inflammation of the bladder and the urinary tract is usually caused by bacteria, and can lead to mild to severe discomfort for your rabbit.

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Symptoms of Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract in Rabbits

Symptoms of a bladder or urinary tract infection include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Decreased urination
  • Painful urination
  • Straining to urinate, or a hunched posture while urinating
  • Blood in the urine
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Brown or beige colored urine
  • Thick or cloudy urine
  • Cries or grunts when urinating, being handled or moving
  • Changes in litter box behavior
  • Urine staining
  • Urine scald, or red irritated skin where there is prolonged urine contact
  • Bladder sludge or stones
  • Loss of fur near genitals or hindquarters
  • Anorexia
  • Weight loss
  • Depression
  • Lethargy
  • Pain
  • Wet tail

Symptoms of renal disease can include:

  • Dehydration
  • Teeth grinding
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Urine odor coming from mouth
  • Increased water consumption

Causes of Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract in Rabbits

The cause of a UTI or bladder infection in your rabbit could be:

  • Bacterial infection
  • Bladder sludge or stones
  • Too much calcium
  • Urinary tract blockage
  • Urinary tract inflammation
  • Abnormal urinary tract that can predispose a rabbit to infections
  • Trauma
  • Endocrine problem, causing increased formation of stones
  • Cancer
  • Renal disease or failure

Diagnosis of Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract in Rabbits

After a regular exam, if a UTI or bladder infection is suspected, a urinalysis is often performed. This may be accompanied by a microscopic examination, and a cystocentesis, wherein a needle is inserted into the bladder to extract a sterile sample for testing. Testing of this sample can confirm what kind of bacteria is infecting your rabbit, and lead your veterinarian to the appropriate antibiotics to prescribe.

There are cases in which the bacteria is fastidious anaerobic, or bacteria that dies when exposed to oxygen, causing the test to be negative. Your veterinarian may be able to further diagnose the condition by examining your rabbit’s urine under a microscope to look for any blood cells present.

In cases where stones, blockages or other more severe issues are suspected, X-rays, urine cultures, and blood tests will be performed. Stones should be able to be detected on X-rays. Bladder disease can be confirmed with a urine culture, blood work, and a complete blood count.If the case is indeed severe, often veterinarians will check to see if the kidneys are affected, and to what extent.

Treatment of Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract in Rabbits

Treatment for the infection will correspond to the underlying cause. For a bacterial cause, antibiotics will be prescribed, with any supportive therapy needed, such as fluid therapy. If a blockage is to blame, treatment can include the surgical removal of stones. Antibiotics are prescribed, and fluids are given if needed. Stones need to be removed, or they will continue to grow in size, inflaming the bladder and urinary tract. Your veterinarian will discuss a proper diet to discourage the stones from reoccurring. 

Sludge may require fluid therapy and antibiotics, and your rabbit may need his bladder manually expressed to remove the sludge. Pain medication may be prescribed for pain and to control spasms. Liquid magnesium has been used to treat chronic sludge. In the case of kidney disease, treatment involves treating the underlying cause, be that bacterial or protozoan infection, stones and sludge, or tumors. Your veterinarian will discuss a treatment plan on a case by case basis once the full extent of the condition is known. In most cases, pain medication is often prescribed. Death is rare, but can occur in cases of bladder rupture, renal disease, or an inability to urinate.

Recovery of Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract in Rabbits

If surgery was performed to remove stones or obstructions, your rabbit may need 1-2 days of hospitalization for pain management and fluid therapy as needed after surgery.

Continued antibiotic treatment at home is generally prescribed, up to several weeks for severe cases of infection. Diet changes may also be recommended. A repeated urine culture may also be recommended to ensure the infection is eradicated, or future veterinary visits to check for stones may be scheduled.

If UTIs are common for your rabbit, prevent reocurrences by having fresh, clean water readily available, feeding your rabbit a diet high in moisture, regularly cleaning your rabbit’s elimination area, and exercising your rabbit regularly to promote healthy urination.

Infection in the Bladder or Urinary Tract Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Biggles
Lionhead
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Not urinating

My pet dwarf lion head hasn’t been urinating, it’s been about a two days. He’s eating and pooping as normal for the most part however he isn’t as interested in the food do to having to change it. He’s also aggressive so it’s hard to pick him up and see if there’s anything noticeable and no vet is available in my area, money is also tight so it’s going to be hard to get him somewhere. Is there anything I can do at home to help him?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
Without examining Biggles I cannot say what the specific cause is and I cannot prescribe any prescription medications. Normal causes for a rabbit not urinating are infections, excess calcium, sludge among other issues; you should try to find a Veterinarian, charity clinic or other organisation which can help. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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daisy
Holland Lop
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

minor hair loss
wet bottom
pee out of litter box

my holland lops bottom is wet but her poo is fine but I dont know about her pee. she never really was litter trained before I got her but I tried and she never would've. I was cleaning her hay and their was pee under it in one spot so maybe thats her spot where she pees? she also sleeps there unfortunately. I've tried switching her sleeping spot but shell always go back. she eats fine and drinks fine she just has a wet bottom. I don't really know if she grunts or makes any noises as she prefers not for me to touch her but when I do she's usually fine. how much does it cost to treat wet tail or bladder or urinary infections?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
First steps should be to clip the wet fur so that you can easily bathe the area to combat urine scalding; as for infections, this price would vary depending on your location (country etc…), severity (length of treatment) and whether any tests are required (culture and sensitivity etc…). I cannot say that the cause is due to an infection or another cause, your local Veterinarian will be able to guide you better. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Coco
Miniature Lop
4 Years
Mild condition
-1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urine Spotting
Thirsty
Urine Marking
Urinating Outside Litterbox

Over the last few weeks, my female mini lop has begun to leave urine spots outside of the litter box - on the carpet, bedspreads, sofa, floors: generally behind her as she moves about. Not always, but often and daily/hourly. It began suddenly and is unusual for her. She is not having large accidents and I cannot see that she is in pain or behaviourally any different (she has had a mild infection once before, and exhibited no symptoms then either). I'm concerned she may have a UTI, but I can't tell if this is just hormonal / behaviour​al marking... any advice? Is this a medical warning sign or is she just being moody?

Her tail is perfectly white - no staining visible when she's hopping around normally.

She does drink a lot of water... but not sure this is unusual / linked? It's not new.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1044 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. To be safe, since you are noticing abnormal behavior, it would probably be best to have her examined by your veterinarian. They can look at her, determine if there is a problem, and recommend any testing or treatment that might be needed.

Thank you. I will follow up with her local vet.

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Bella
Mini lop
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Breaths Faster At Rest
Urine Marking
Blood In Urine
Blood In Stool

Why is my rabbit peeing blood and tilting her head??
She just gave birth a couple of days ago and now she sits on a wierd.She shows her foot when she sits and stretches them out she alsohas warm ears and eats a lot.when she is eating she chews very loudly when im around her a couple of days ago her babies are fine but i dont know if its her thats okay its also her first time giving birth and now she doesnt move often she also get irratated when i touch her.she poops alot too. Do u know what should i do?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1044 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Bella should be seen by a veterinarian. The stress of having kits on her body can lower her immune system, and she may have developed an infection. Your veterinarian will be able to examine her, determine what might be going on, and get her treatment. I hope that she is okay.

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Lepus
Netherland Dwarf
6 years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My rabbit isn't drinking much water, urinating infrequently, and has a red and inflamed genitals. He is about six years old constantly gets fecal matter stuck in his hair around his anus. He refuses to be active, just sitting in the corner when let out to run and won't eat his hay. I don't know what to do to make him better. He had his last vet visit about 2 weeks ago and they said he seemed ok, but i think he's sick, please help.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
If the genital area is inflamed, you should clean the area with a dilute antiseptic but should also visit your Veterinarian again in case there is an infection which requires antibiotic treatment. Without examining Lepus, I cannot say what the specific cause is but should be addressed especially if he isn’t eating hay or drinking enough. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chilli
Dutch split
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Scouring bottom and underneath

3yr old girl rabbit. Been to Pdsa given 2ml per day antibiotic. Got changed to twice a day. Rabbit has severe scouring with split skin in places. Am taking all fur off slowly. Bathing and admin medical manuka on open bits plus 10+ manuka oral. She is eating but passing small amounts of wee. How long before this could clear up? She had scan and all clear.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1044 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without more information on her condition, what medications she is taking, and what else might be going on with her, I cannot comment on how long her recovery could take. It would be a great question to ask your veterinarian, who saw her and knows more about her specific condition and medications. I hope that she is okay.

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Hazel
Mini lob
1 Year
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

My rabbit's urine starting to have a blood brown colour. Scabs starting on her back. Her look drops is little small black drops. Is this any sign of a bladder infection?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
Urine of rabbits may have various colours and may change to dark red or other colours due to pigments in the diet, just like if humans eat too much beetroot. The scabs on the back may be caused by a few different causes including infections, trauma (from cage etc…), parasites or internal disease. I would get Hazel checked out for the scabs on her back, but the urine may be just diet related but wouldn’t hurt to get it checked. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Peanut
mini rex
14 Weeks
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

pee,poop,or vomi looks like oatmeal
not drinking much water
Wet tail

My rabbit peanut seems to be sick I am scared he has something very serious I don't know how long its been going on but I think for only a few days can some one please help me!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
Technically rabbits cannot vomit, if you are not recognising what you are seeing as being food then it is most likely from defecation (or urination); you should have Peanut checked over by your Veterinarian since his young age also means that he will be prone to infections, parasites and other conditions. Try to find a Veterinarian with experience in rabbits to help Peanut. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Captain smash
Netherland Dwarf
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate
Little appetite
Wet tail

Does my bunny have a UTI? He is a Netherlands dwarf names smash, He is around 5 yr he is usually very social and is a house bunny litter bib trained but the last eeek I have noticed a lot of accidents he is straining to pee has a wet tail and doesn’t look comfortable what should I do

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2466 Recommendations
The symptoms you are describing may be attributable to infection, partial blockage, loss of bladder tone among other causes; if Captain Smash’s appetite is also affected you should consider visiting your Veterinarian for a thorough examination to determine whether a course of antibiotics are required or if he requires a different course of therapy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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