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What is Poisoning?

Unlike most other animals, rabbits are unable to regurgitate or vomit. Therefore, rabbits are not able to rid their bodies of poison. In addition,  rabbits can also recycle poison and toxic compounds through their digestive systems because they're caecotrophic. 

Exposure to inappropriate foods (such as garlic, onions, chocolate, and grapes), dangerous household products (cleaning supplies, antifreeze, detergents), plants, and medications may allow for your pet to accidentally ingest, inhale or have contact with a harmful substance. Mild to severe symptoms may result due to poisoning; signs of toxicity may not be immediately apparent. If you suspect your pet has experienced a toxic exposure, a veterinarian visit is essential.

Poisoning in rabbits can occur when your pet is exposed to toxic compounds such as those found in insecticides, flea collars, household cleaners, and medications.

Poisoning Average Cost

From 293 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

Symptoms of Poisoning in Rabbits

Depending on how long the poisonous compound has been present in your rabbit’s system, the severity of the symptoms, and the present age and health condition of your rabbit, the resulting toxicity will range from mild to severe.

  • Abdominal tenderness
  • Bleeding externally or internally
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Difficult or labored breathing
  • Elevated or low body temperature
  • Hunched posture
  • Intestinal inflammation
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Lack of appetite for food or water
  • Lethargy
  • Mouth irritation
  • Pain
  • Seizures
  • Weakness
  • Death
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Causes of Poisoning in Rabbits

Application 

  • Flea control products
  • Highly concentrated ointments and sprays
  • Indoor and outdoor insecticides and pesticides

Ingestion

  • Anticoagulant mice and rat poisons
  • Automotive products
  • Household products
  • Herbicides
  • Human food
  • Human medicine
  • Metal
  • Plants
  • Veterinary medicine

Inhalation of certain products may be a cause for toxicity also.

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Diagnosis of Poisoning in Rabbits

Once at the veterinarian clinic, let the veterinary team know what symptoms are present as well as whether you have knowledge of exposure to a potential poison or irritant. If you are aware of the product, plant, or medicine for example, that your rabbit companion may have been exposed to, be certain to bring the packaging, medication bottle or plant sample to the clinic in order to aid the veterinary team in the diagnosis.

A physical examination that will allow the veterinarian to rule out other conditions that may present similarly to poisoning. In addition, certain clinical signs may point to poisoning (plant remnants in the mouth or household cleaning product residue on the fur). The veterinarian will also conduct blood tests to see if there are any abnormalities or underlying health conditions, and may perform x-rays to locate any substances or masses in your rabbit's gastrointestinal tract.

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Treatment of Poisoning in Rabbits

Many poisoning cases are reversible if they are treated in an aggressive and prompt manner. Treatment will be based on the type of poison affecting your rabbit. Prognosis and recovery ultimately depend on the cause, the severity of your rabbit's condition, and how quickly you responded to your rabbit's symptoms. Your veterinarian will choose to treat your rabbit with one or more of the following treatment options:

  • Activated charcoal will bind poisons in the stomach
  • Artificial respiration will be used if your pet’s breathing is labored
  • Blood transfusions can be required with rodent poison exposure
  • Body temperature regulation
  • Hydration therapy if your rabbit is dehydrated due to vomiting and diarrhea
  • Pain management for stomach ulceration
  • Gastric lavage to eliminate poison
  • Vitamin K in the case of certain toxicities
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Recovery of Poisoning in Rabbits

Once your rabbit is cleared to go home from the clinic, he will require at-home monitoring. A quiet place for recovery, and plenty of water must be available. The veterinarian will advise on the recommended diet for the next few days. Some rabbits will need medication if there are lingering gastrointestinal issues.

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Poisoning Average Cost

From 293 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

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Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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netherland dwarf

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Four Years

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Unknown severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Behavior Change

Bunny may have nibbled some Adderall that had fallen on the ground and out of sight. He’s eating and drinking a lot of water, as well as pooping normally. It seems like he had something resembling a seizure but has been fine ever since. I found the nibbled tablet days after my bunny’s episode, and even though he hasn’t had another since, his personality is much different and he is uncoordinated, and is no longer using his litter box to poop as he normally would. He has a vet appointment on Friday.

March 16, 2021

Owner

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Dr. Sara O. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Hello this can be very concerning in bunnies. I would try to find an emergency vet that can see your bunny right away. Any illness in bunnies can be life threatening

March 16, 2021

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dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Lion head rabbit

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Six Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

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5 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Shaking

My Rabbit ate some chrysanthemum flowers? What should I do?

Sept. 27, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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5 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. I hope that your rabbit is okay. If they are having problems, Since I cannot see your pet, it would be best to have them seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get treatment for your pet.

Oct. 14, 2020

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Poisoning Average Cost

From 293 quotes ranging from $300 - $2,000

Average Cost

$850

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