How to Train Your Beagle Dog to Sit

Easy
3-14 Days
General

Introduction

Beagles are fantastic dogs for the family. They’re friendly and full of love. Everyone in your household loves your Beagle and he can always put a smile on your face. However, he isn’t the best-trained dog. Beagles are known for being stubborn and require creative training techniques, and he certainly proves the point. You can’t get him to ‘sit’, ‘wait’ or any of the essential commands. He’s more interested in following his nose than following your instructions. It can be extremely frustrating training him and so far you’ve had no luck. Fortunately, that is all about to change.

Succeed with this training and you’ve got the perfect foundation to teach him a range of other commands. ‘Sit’ is important for teaching him discipline and asserting your position as the pack leader. Once you’ve done that you’ll be able to stamp out bad habits with ease.

Defining Tasks


Training a normal dog to sit is relatively straightforward. Beagles, however, don’t always make life so easy. You need to be creative and really appeal to their natural instincts. They’re hounds and following their nose is what they love doing best. That means you need to use some smelly treats and food to get him on task. Once you’ve found the right incentive you’ll be able to swiftly whip him into shape. If he’s a puppy he should be very responsive and he could get the hang of it in just a few days. If he’s older and particularly stubborn then you may need a couple of weeks.

Get this right and you’ll be able to quickly instruct him to sit. This will make feeding him at meal times and putting on his leash a walk in the park. Teaching him ‘down’ and ‘stay’ will be much easier if you’ve already mastered ‘sit’.

Getting Started

Before training can start you’ll need to stock up on a few items. Find some extra smelly treats. Alternatively, break his favorite food into small pieces. You’ll use this to motivate him during training.

You’ll need to invest in a clicker for one of the methods. Then set aside 10 minutes each day for training. Try and find a time where you won’t be distracted by kids and a noisy household. Take him to a quiet room and practice there.

The only other thing you need is patience and a pro-active attitude. With that, your work can begin!

The Food Lure Method

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Step
1
Setting up
Take him into a quiet room. As you go, stay relatively quiet. You want him focused and concentrating so don’t get him too worked up. Make sure you’ve got a pocket full of treats too.
Step
2
Hold out a treat
Capture his attention by holding a treat in front of his nose. Make sure he can smell it but that he can’t get to it.
Step
3
‘Sit’
Issue a ‘sit’ command in a clear voice. Try and keep it upbeat and playful. Beagles learn best if they think they’re playing a big game. You can use any word you like, Beagles can learn hundreds of different phrases.
Step
4
Arch
Now slowly move your hand back over his head. He will naturally follow your hand with his nose. This will force him to sit down so he can keep close to it. If he doesn’t sit down on his own you can gently push his bottom down to help him the first few times.
Step
5
Reward
As soon as he sits down, hand over the treat and give him lots of praise. The happier he feels, the more likely he is to repeat the behavior next time. Practice this for a few minutes each day until he’s got the hang of it.
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The Clicker Method

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Step
1
Get him clicker friendly
A clicker can be used to signal to him when he’s behaved or performed a trick correctly. This method of communication will make training much quicker. So, click straight after he follows any instruction. If you tell him to wait for his meal, for example. Use it consistently for a few days.
Step
2
Hold a treat out
Hold a treat in front of his nose. Keep it at his head height and make sure his attention is on you. Try and use the smelliest food you can find, this will appeal to Beagles' heightened sense of smell.
Step
3
Guide him
Rotate your hand back over his head. Do this slowly so his nose stays close to your hand. He will naturally sit down as he tries to arch back and stay close to the treat.
Step
4
Click & reward
As soon as he sits down, click. This will signal to him he’s performed the trick correctly. You can then hand over the treat and give him some praise. The better the reward the more eager he will be to do it again.
Step
5
Lose the treats
Practice this daily until he’s fully got the hang of it. You can then gradually cut out the treats. Keep using the clicker, however, so he knows he’s still doing the right thing. You can then use the clicker to teach him other commands too.
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The Timing Method

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Step
1
Wait until before a meal
Try and do your training before a big meal. Beagles love food and you’ll find he’s much more focused if he’s hungry. So, head to a room with some tasty treats in your hand and your beagle in tow.
Step
2
‘Sit’
Give the command in a friendly voice. You want him to think this is all great fun. Beagles learn fast and remain focused for longer if they think they’re playing a game. You don’t have to use the word ‘sit’, you can use any phrase you like.
Step
3
Guide him
While on your knees, slowly move your hand back over his head. He will tilt his head back as he tries to follow your hand. This should automatically make him sit down. Keep moving back until he sits.
Step
4
Reward
Now hand over the reward. Make sure he gets it within 3 seconds, otherwise he may not associate the behavior with the command. You can also spend a minute or so playing with him after to keep it upbeat.
Step
5
Practice
Now you just need to practice until he’s into the swing of it. As he improves you can train him at any point in the day, not just when he’s hungry. Make sure you only give the command once though. Give it a number of times and he’ll think he doesn’t have to follow your instructions the first time.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
lola
Beagle
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
lola
Beagle
2 Months

how do i teach her what the word no means!? i’m okay with taking the time

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
114 Dog owners recommended

Hello! What I have found is dogs quickly learn to ignore the word no, because we use it for everything. I am going to give you some basic commands to use in place of no. "Leave it" for things you want them to leave alone/not get into or go after. Also "off" for jumping. Those seem to be the two major areas where people use the word no. You can take the same principals to "quiet" for barking, and any other behavior your dog is exhibiting. Basically put a command to it, and once they are doing what is expected, you reward them with attention, praise, and/or a treat. Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Off You can teach “off” to get your dog to move when you want his spot on the couch. It’s easier — and kinder — to have the dog jump off the couch (or chair or bed) on cue than to lift or push him off. Teaching “off” is also a great way to work to stop jumping. End behavior: On cue, the dog will remove his paws (or his entire body) from the item, person or surface he is currently on. Step 1: When your dog has her paws or his body up on something (such as a counter or table, or you), say “off” and use a treat in front of her nose to lure her off of the item. As soon as all paws are back on the ground, praise and give her the treat. Repeat the next few times she gets up on something. Then, test your cue: Say “off” and see if she gets off. If she does, move on to the next step. If she does not, repeat Step 1 five more times and test again. Tip: If the dog won’t follow the treat as you try to lure her off, you need a higher-value treat. It’s important to use a treat or food item that your dog really likes, so that getting off of the thing she is on is much more rewarding than staying on it. Step 2: As soon as she gets off of the item when you say “off,” praise and treat. Once she is reliably getting off when you cue her, you can start fading the click and treat part by starting to praise her or giving her treats randomly.

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