Activities For A Canyoning Enthusiast With Dogs

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

When it comes to hardcore activities that'll get your blood pumping and your heart racing, there aren't many others that are as paradoxically intense and as soothing as canyoning. Also referred to as canyoneering, canyoning is a very challenging sport that's primarily centered around using specialized pieces of equipment to scale some (admittedly precarious) pieces of terrain. It's a lot like rock climbing, but in areas that typically are much more moist and enclosed than the sort of spots rock climbers favor. Suffice it to say that canyoning isn't exactly the most dog-friendly activity in the world, as canines and verticality typically don't mix too well. But just because a canyoning enthusiast may not be able to scale a waterfall with their dog by their side doesn't mean they can't bring their pet along for the ride and have fun in a number of other, more unique ways.

Nature Walking

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Easy
30 - 60 min
Items needed
Dog Leash
waste bags
water
Activity description
If you think about it, most canyoning groups end up going for nature walks inadvertently as they simply walk from their cars to their canyoning destinations. While your dog may not be able to join you as you scale up and down the surface of your choosing, they'll be more than happy to accompany you for a nature walk - even if it is an impromptu walk. You don't really need much to go on a nature walk with your dog, save for their leash or harness. Nature walks can be completed during any kind of weather, so you don't have to worry about trying to find the "perfect day" with the "perfect weather" for this activity.
Step
1
Nature walking, not nature racing
This activity is meant to be a low impact affair; neither you nor your dog really need to physically exert yourselves all that much to get the most out of a nature walk - move at a brisk, controlled pace and you'll be able to get all of the physical, mental, and spiritual benefits that this activity has to offer.
Step
2
Added challenge
If you're absolutely looking to get a workout from this activity, then you can swing your arms back and forth as you and your pet complete this activity. Be mindful while moving your arms, as you won't want to move them too quickly or at such an angle that proves to be uncomfortable for your pet.
Step
3
Nurture nature
Respect nature as it is - undisturbed and peaceful, trying to leave it as such throughout the entirety of your walk. Keep your dog leashed and on the trail, allowing the creatures who make the trail their home to continue to feel safe. Pick up after your pet when needed and do not leave any garbage behind.
Love this activity?

Hiking

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Moderate
Normal
45 - 60 min
Items needed
Leash and Harness
Backpack
Hiking Stick
Water
Map or GPS
waste bags
Activity description
The sort of terrain that's perfect for canyoning is also typically perfect for hiking! Before or after you and your group finish canyoneering for the day, consider taking your dog for a nice, peaceful hike through the surrounding terrain. Hiking is an activity that's very dog-friendly and has a lot of facets to it that potentially will make your dog's presence all the more valuable. Depending on the terrain and climate of the area, you'll need to gather certain supplies. As you are up for the challenge, you and your hiking buddy can traverse the terrain in any weather. The two of you can check out potential canyoneering sites along the way.
Step
1
Hiking best practices
The number one best practice when it comes to hiking with a dog is to always stick together; even if you and your dog are hiking through an area that's known to be utterly devoid of any forms of predatory wildlife, you should never let your dog out of your sight to ensure that they don't get lost. Another great practice is to make a habit of cleaning up after yourself and your dog. That way, you'll be keeping things dog-friendly and eco-friendly.
Step
2
Mapping things out
Most canyoning spots are located in offroad areas, so knowing how to use a map is a must for anyone interested in giving the sport a try. Experienced canyoneers will have already developed their own methods for navigating through the wilderness, but inexperienced canyoneers will want to play things by the book; know how to use a traditional map, a standard GPS system, and a compass before embarking on a hike with your pet and you'll never really have to worry about getting lost in the wilds.
Step
3
Hike and hydrate
An all-important must to remember is hydration for both you and your pup. You may feel that a break isn't necessary but a 5 minute stop for water and a viewing of the area will allow you to continue further before heading back home. Watch your dog's signals for fatigue: lying down, lack of interest or vocalizing mean it's time to turn back.
Love this activity?

Rowboating

Popular
0 Votes
Sunny Day
Expensive
Hard
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Rowboat and Paddles
Life Jackets
First Aid Kits
Activity description

A number of popular canyoning spots can only be reach via sailing, motoring, or rowing over. Rowboating is definitely the most physically intense means of travel out of those three, as you'll need to move both of your arms in tandem in order to properly move and steer your vessel. Your dog's job, during this whole affair, will be to act on their best behavior and demonstrate top-notch boat etiquette while you put in most of the physical work. This sunny day activity can be pricey, with a decent rowboat costing at least $300. You'll also need to buy a life jacket for yourself and your dog, so add on another $80. Top it off with another $60 to $80 to pay for food and first aid kit supplies. 

Step
1
Practicing on land
This step might look pretty funny to someone observing from a distance, but it can help your dog adapt to a rowboat much more quickly and effectively if you do it right. Before pushing off, let your dog practice getting in and out of the boat for a few minutes. Next, try sitting in the boat and "air rowing" while your dog sits by your side. Do this a few times to get them used to the overall flow of this activity.
Step
2
Mini trips
Before taking your dog out on a long, full day trip it is a good idea to take your dog out on a few short trips. You can even make these short excursions around the dock if need be - a few 5 or 10 minute trips can work wonders towards helping your pup get adjusted to the movement of a boat on the water.
Step
3
Boat etiquette
This term just refers to the way that one is supposed to act while they're aboard a watercraft. All a dog needs to do to comply with this phrase is to keep still and not make too much ruckus. Boat etiquette is basically impulse control for a dog - once your pet knows how to resist their urges, they'll be ready to travel with you.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Mineral Collecting

Certain areas that a canyoning enthusiast might visit during an excursion have all sorts of unique rocks and mineral deposits stored all around the place. You and your dog could spend some time collecting rocks and minerals together in between canyoning sessions - you can have your dog hold onto a basket or bag of some sort while you collect any interesting samples that catch your eye.

Photography

Anyone who's gone on enough canyoning trips will tell you that there's no shortage of picturesque views out in the wilderness. If you're interested in capturing some of that magic with your dog's aid then you can help your dog assume various poses while you take pictures of them near some of the natural landmarks you're undoubtedly going to come across in the great outdoors.

Camping

A lot of the time when folks head out with canyoning on their minds, they tend to stay in the area they're going to explore for a few days at least. Canyoning enthusiasts who are planning on spending a few days roughing it in the wilderness should consider bringing their dogs along so that they can keep you and your group company at base camp - and vice versa.

Conclusion

One of the principles behind canyoning is experiencing nature in a fun and unique way. While we'd never encourage our readers to do anything that might put their pets' lives in jeopardy, we also understand and respect the fact that most canyoneers do what they do in order to interact with nature in a way that they typically aren't able to. That's why we compiled a number of activities that canyoning enthusiasts can complete with their pets which will keep your dog out of harm's way while also allowing the both of you to appreciate the natural beauty that can only really be found in those special, wild places in the world.