Activities For Drevers

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Introduction

Drever breed dogs are small Swedish hounds with short legs and a long back. They specialize in tracking and hunting roe deer; they are less likely to startle the deer than other hound breeds as their short legs cause them to move more slowly, but they are also quite talented at locating rabbit, fox, and even boar. When not hunting, these dogs tend to be easy going and gentle with both humans and other dogs, but unless they are working, they typically should not be let off lead as their nose can sometimes get them into trouble

Scent Work

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Any Day
Moderate
Normal
15 - 45 min
Items needed
Scent
Activity description

Dogs have a much more refined sense of smell than humans do as their noses are, on average, around forty times more sensitive than ours are. Scenthounds, like the Drever, were developed with an even greater sense of smell than average in order to enable them to track and find prey for their human partner. While the Drever may be slower than many other hounds, they are powerful and determined trackers. Teaching your dog scent work caters to their natural instincts, provides them with exercise that is good for both their mind and body and can also improve their performance as a hunting dog or as a search and rescue dog. 

Step
1
Pick a place
Initially, scent work should be done in familiar surroundings such as your home or your backyard. As your dog begins mastering the subject, where you want to practice will depend on what you want your dog to do in the future. If you are training a hunting dog, utilizing scent work in the field will strengthen their performance, while dogs that are competing at trials should practice with other people around, and dogs being trained for search and rescue should practice in as many environments as safely possible. If you are training for a specific purpose, contacting a group or association that specializes in your purpose, such as a hunting club, dog sports facility, or search and rescue association, can be extremely helpful.
Step
2
Choose a scent
While high-value food treats may seem like a good motivator, most trainers and scent work kits find it more effective to start with a specific scent. Introductory scent work kits are typically equipped with specific scent markers like birch and anise that can be associated with a motivating reward. Dogs that are being trained for a specific purpose may choose to utilize specific scents, for instance, hunting dogs may be trained on the scent of fox or deer while search and rescue may be trained to the scent of humans.
Step
3
Search
Once you have determined what scent to employ and where you want to utilize it, you can start practicing. As they begin to master searching for a single specific scent, you can up the challenge of the game by introducing additional scents or placing the scent in a higher or more inaccessible spot.
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Group Obedience

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Any Day
Moderate
Normal
30 - 60 min
Items needed
Leash
Activity description

Drever breed dogs are known to be independent and self-sufficient in comparison to many other breeds, but in some cases, this independence can morph into stubbornness, and you may end up with a difficult dog on your hands. Enrolling your dog in an obedience or another type of training class frequently helps to prevent stubbornness from taking hold and taking a group class will help to effectively socialize your dog, ensuring that your dog’s generally friendly nature towards other dogs remains intact. While classes will have to be paid for, they are highly worth the money, time and effort put into them!

Step
1
Choose a training method
Basic obedience classes are never really a bad choice when determining what type of class to enroll your dog in, but many scent work classes, rally obedience, and other workshops are often available in a group setting. These dogs are intelligent and tend to form strong bonds with their owners. They respond well to firm, but positive training and they have a great deal of determination, which can make them outstanding in a number of different disciplines.
Step
2
Pick a training venue
Training facilities can differ greatly from one another, not only in pricing, but also in the type of facilities, the methods of training used, and in the timing of classes. You can do a great deal of research online, but it is a good idea to visit the facility where the classes are held or to get personal recommendations from other pet-parents that you trust. Some training groups allow visitors to observe classes before signing up in order to see if the class will be a good fit for you and your canine companion.
Step
3
Keep going
The Drever is an intelligent and determined breed and continuing their education throughout their lives will help to keep their mind happy and occupied. While Drever dogs that are employed as hunting dogs have plenty to keep them busy when hunting is available, they may become bored and destructive during the off-season if they do not have an alternate activity to keep them busy.
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Search and Rescue

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Any Day
Expensive
Hard
1 - 3 hrs
Items needed
Leash
Certifications
Activity description

Drever dogs may not appear to be heroes in the making at first glance, but their superior sense of smell and their extreme determination make them excellent candidates for this type of work. With their small stature and natural talent of locating things that dwell in forests, they may be particularly well-suited to cadaver searches, tracking, and wilderness searches. Well-socialized Drevers tend to be friendly with people and canines alike making them suitable for urban searches as well as searches that involve finding lost pets rather than people. This activity requires a great deal of interaction between the dog and the handler and often leads to the strengthening of the bonds between the two. 

Step
1
Determine eligibility
Search, and rescue is not only a physically taxing job but also mentally and emotionally taxing for both the dog and their handler. Both the canine and the handler should be examined to ensure that they are able to stand up to the physical rigors of the job. Dogs that are under eighteen months of age are not eligible for the targeted training required to become a Search and Rescue dog until they have matured.
Step
2
Get your certifications
Training facilities can differ greatly from one another, not only in pricing, but also in the type of facilities, the methods of training used, and in the timing of classes. You can do a great deal of research online, but it is a good idea to visit the facility where the classes are held or to get personal recommendations from other pet-parents that you trust. Some training groups allow visitors to observe classes before signing up in order to see if the class will be a good fit for you and your canine companion.
Step
3
Train and certify your dog
Groups like the National Search Dog Alliance (NSDA), National Association of Search and Rescue (NASAR), Search and Rescue Dogs of the United States (SARDUS), or FEMA’s Urban Search and Rescue Certification program are available to offer nationally recognized SAR training programs and will provide the correct certification for dogs that are suited for this type of work.
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More Fun Ideas...

Hiking

The Drever was developed to have an incredible amount of stamina which makes them an excellent companion on long hikes in the wilderness.

Search for your Supper

Another way to put the scenting ability of the Drever to work is to hide their supper in the house. When your dog masters finding their hidden food bowl, you can put their kibble into puzzle toys designed for treats or you can hide the food in multiple places around the house.

Conclusion

The Drever is a hound dog, with both the natural scenting ability and the strong prey drive that is found in most hounds. While they may appear to be content relaxing indoors they are at their healthiest when they are given a great deal of both physical and mental exercise. They have a somewhat independent nature and thrive best when introduced to obedience training at a young age.