Activities For Foxtons

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Introduction

A cross between a Boston and a Fox Terrier, your average Foxton is a goofy little guy who loves nothing more than playtime! Foxtons are usually quite affectionate and always on the lookout for furry and non-furry friends alike.

Like all terriers, Foxtons were bred to catch rats and other vermin. This means that they’re rather intelligent and possess a strong stubborn streak -- they require a good deal of mental stimulation to keep them from getting bored and destructive. They’re also pretty high-energy, active pooches. Read on to find out how to keep your buddy’s brain and body working to keep them as healthy and happy as can be.

Stairball

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0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Easy
20 min
Items needed
Ball
Activity description

With a Foxton, it’s always a good idea to vary exercise! Stairball puts a new spin on the classic game of fetch by introducing the challenge of running up and down a set of steps. This has two serious benefits -- first, the extra activity means that stairball takes comparatively less time than fetch, and assuming you have a two-story house, it’s a fun game to play indoors in inclement weather.

Stairball also takes less physical exertion on your part, so it’s an ideal game for owners with mobility issues! You can use a chair instead of standing, and use a special ball thrower if moving your arms is difficult.

Step
1
Throw the ball up the stairs
You’ll want to position yourself a few feet away from the bottom step, lest your buddy barrel into you on the way back down. Throw the ball up to the top of the steps. Don’t worry if you can’t quite reach the top, your pupper will still have a whale of a time running after it!
Step
2
Get your buddy to bring it back down
If your doggo knows the basics of fetch already, they should run to the top of the steps, grab the ball and bring it back down to you. Reward your canine companion the first few times they bring the ball back -- even if they have the basic context of fetch down, this is still a new game for them, and some positive reinforcement should help them adjust to it.
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Give Your Pup a Pedicure

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Any Day
Cheap
Normal
45 min
Items needed
Nail clippers
Moisturizer
Styptic powder
Activity description

You may know how to brush and bathe your dog, but what do you know about puppy nail care? Sometimes a doggo’s nails take care of themselves in terms of length -- they wear down naturally as the dog walks on hard surfaces. However, if your pooch gets to play in a grassy paradise (your lawn), you might have to trim their talons yourself.

If you two would like to get creative, there are doggy nail polishes on the market for you two to play with. Under no circumstances should you use human nail polish on a pup’s toenails -- the chemicals are bad for them.

Step
1
Calm your dog
Not all dogs like getting their nails trimmed, so it’s a good idea to get them to chill out first. A good way to do this is with a massage. You can also put on some soothing music, or even turn off the lights and light some candles. Just make sure that all naked flames are out of your dog’s reach. You should also spend a good few minutes rubbing your dog’s feet to get them used to you touching them -- some furry friends aren’t fans of having their paws touched.
Step
2
Trim those talons
Before you cut your pup’s nails, rub some moisturiser into their paws and claws. Either use a specially formulated dog moisturiser or a natural alternative like olive oil. This should help your pooch unwind, as well as soften their nails. A guillotine-style nail clipper should work well on a Foxton’s toenails. Trim the the nails very carefully, stopping a couple of millimeters from the quick. If you do accidentally cut too close, apply the styptic powder. Your canine companion might require some comfort during this process, so be ready with plenty of pats and possibly a few treats.
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Make Your Own Food Puzzle

Popular
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Any Day
Cheap
Easy
45 min
Items needed
Muffin tin
Treats
Tennis balls
Activity description

Food puzzles have grown in popularity in recent years, and it’s easy to see why -- they’re a quick and convenient way to give your buddy’s brain something to chew on. They’re a great, low-effort way to keep your pupper entertained, as they try to solve the puzzle to get to the edible goodies inside.

You can find food puzzles in your local pet store, but did you know that you can easily make your own at home? All you’ll need is a muffin tin, a handful of treats or kibble, and some tennis balls.

Step
1
Assemble the puzzle
Put a treat in each cup of the muffin tin, and place a tennis ball on top. It’s that easy! If you’d like to add some extra layers of challenge for your canine companion, you can cut the tennis balls in half to make them harder to dislodge. If you don’t have that many tennis balls around, you can use balled up pieces of paper.
Step
2
Attract your dog's attention
The tray should be at your pupper’s nose height -- with a Foxton, that means on the floor. Your buddy shouldn’t need too much encouragement to sniff out the treats. They were literally born for the task! However, at first, you might need to put a treat on top of one of the tennis balls to entice them over. After that, it’s time to watch the fun!
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More Fun Ideas...

Guard Dog Training

It may seem silly to imagine this pint-sized pooch as a guard dog, but this type of training can be invaluable for a Foxton! These dogs are notorious barkers, and guard dog training can help teach them to bark mindfully -- i.e., to alert you only when danger is near.

Hiking

Sometimes a pup and their person just need to get back to nature! Your doggo will jump at the chance to sniff and explore some trails by your side. Getting out into a new environment is also a grrr-eat way to keep your buddy’s brain engaged while you exercise.

Conclusion

Adorable, affectionate and family-friendly, Foxtons can be a true joy to own! Your bouncing buddy may be full of energy, but with a little creativity, it isn’t too hard to tire them out. The above activities should help -- you’d be barking mad not to give at least some of them a try!