Activities For Frenchie Staffs

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Introduction

Frenchie Staffs are the paw-fect dogs for those looking for a devoted companion! A distinctive-looking cross between a French Bulldog and an American Staffordshire Terrier, these stocky lumps are one of the most loyal furry friends out there, and they’re great with kids to boot. However, there’s a bit of a trade-off to all this unconditional love — Frenchie Staffs are prone to separation anxiety and really don’t do well when left alone. If you work long hours, you might want to consider booking a Wag! dog sitter.

These pooches are intelligent, active, playful little guys who want nothing more than to be involved in your life. Read on to find out how to keep your Frenchie Staff’s brain busy, body moving, and to give them the love and affection they need.

Chase Training

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Sunny Day
Cheap
Normal
30 min
Items needed
Flirt pole
Lure
Activity description

Staffordshires are terriers, and Frenchie Staffs take after their vermin-hunting parent in one key respect — they’re notorious chasers and have a tendency to tear after smaller, scurrying critters. You might not think this is a bad trait if you’re trying to keep down rodents on your property, but without careful training, Frenchie Staffs might chase after anything, including next door’s cat, the mailman, and (heaven forbid) passing cars.

Chasing is a natural behavior for these doggos, and it may not be the best idea to try to train out this instinct entirely. Fortunately, there are some easy ways to teach your pup that running after people and animals is not okay — and they’re both plenty of fun for your pooch, too!

Step
1
Use a flirt pole or lure
A flirt pole, at its most basic, is a long pole with a toy attached to the end by a string. A lure can be anything — a toy with string wrapped around it that you can drag on the ground, or even a kite if you think it will attract your buddy’s attention! Flirt poles are the easiest for the less athletic among us to use. All you need to do is wave them about and let your pupper leap after it. You may need to do some running about with a different type of lure, so this may be a better choice if you’re trying to get fit alongside your doggo.
Step
2
Stay, chase, drop it
Before you begin, get your buddy to stay, and release them after you’ve waved the pole or lure about for a bit. This will teach them that it’s only okay to chase when you tell them to. You’ll also want to make sure that your buddy knows to drop the toy on command. It’s recommended that you let your pooch catch the toy after a few minutes, otherwise they’ll get frustrated.
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Guard Dog Training

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Any Day
Moderate
Normal
2 hrs
Items needed
Treats
Leash
Activity description

Frenchie Staffs weren’t just bred to take on the companion role of the adoring French Bulldogs. Their loyalty, combined with their Staffy parent’s courage, makes them pretty good watchdogs, too! These puppers are also known for their willingness to fight when they feel that they or those they love are threatened — which can certainly cause some trouble.

Not only do you want your buddy to avoid aggression, you’ll also want to train out the barking that can result when they try to alert you to danger. These two problems have the same solution — guard dog or watchdog training. Your pupper needs to learn what is and isn’t dangerous, so that they can alert you in case of an intruder, rather than a strange pooch at the dog park.

Step
1
Investigate classes in your area
There are ways that you can teach certain techniques (like mindful barking) at home, but for serious training, it's best to reach out to a professional. It’s essential that you make sure your trainer is properly accredited — anyone can call themselves a dog trainer, qualified or not. Look for qualifications from organizations like American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior or the American Animal Hospital Association, or a degree or diploma in animal behavior from a reputable college or university.
Step
2
Be prepared to get involved
A dog trainer who doesn’t want you involved in your dog’s learning is not a good dog trainer. Most classes should allow you to attend with your pupper. At the very least, you should be given tasks to practice with your dog at home. A couple of hours a week isn’t going to be enough to ingrain a learned behavior, so get ready to do some homework! Have some treats on hand during your practice sessions to reinforce the behavior — positive reinforcement and praise also goes a long way.
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Doggy Massage

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Any Day
Free
Easy
30 min
Items needed
Grooming supplies
Activity description

A massage can be a really relaxing experience for your dog, but it’s extra special for a Frenchie Staff. Massaging your pup yourself puts them right at the center of your attention (exactly where they want to be) and gives them a ton of hands-on physical affection. Make no bones about it, this is a great way to make your pooch feel loved!

Petting a happy doggo helps humans de-stress too — so much so that many colleges now have visiting puppy days to calm students down at exam time. To make it extra relaxing, you can light some scented candles and put on some soothing music. While you're at it, why not treat your pooch to an at-home spa day and trim their fur and nails?

Step
1
Pet your pup all over
If you’re massaging your furry friend for the first time, you’re going to want to make sure that they’re okay with you touching them. Frenchie Staffs are super cuddly, so your canine companion is probably well used to being petted, but might not be so sure about having their chest or belly touched. Some dogs have specific no-go areas — legs are a particularly common one. Petting your pup gently will give you a good idea of where these are. If your pooch balks, don’t force it.
Step
2
Massage
You can massage in a circular motion, or just pet your pup the way you usually would, but with some extra pressure. Different dogs like different techniques — keep an eye on your four-pawed pal’s reactions to find out what kind of motion and pressure level makes them feel best. It’s generally recommended to start with your dog’s shoulders before moving on to their back, chest and legs. Again, don’t touch them anywhere that makes them uncomfortable!
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More Fun Ideas...

Gardening

If your pooch knows not to dig anywhere but their pit, why not let them tag along while you tend the vegetable patch or prune the roses? Include your Frenchie Staff in as many of your hobbies as possible — they like nothing more than to stay by your side.

Build a Digging Pit

Frenchie Staffs love to dig, but most owners don’t love having holes in their lawn. Building a digging pit allows them to have their own special area to do their thing. You can encourage your buddy to use the pit by burying treats or favorite toys in there.

Conclusion

Some pet parents might find these cute canines to be a little clingy, but with the right amount of love and affection (and some careful training), Frenchie Staffs can be an absolute joy to own. The above activities should help to keep them as happy and healthy as can be. You’d be barking mad not to give them a try!