Activities For Lancashire Heelers

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

The Lancashire Heeler was likely developed in Great Britan as both a herding dog and as pest control for the barn and home at some point during the seventeenth century. They are believed to be the descendants of the Corgi and Manchester Terrier breeds, although other breeds such as the Dachshund may also be involved. They are short, sturdy dogs with a great deal of agility, determination, and intelligence who require daily mental stimulation as well as physical activity to retain their vigor.

Treibball

Popular
0 Votes
Sunny Day
Moderate
Normal
15 - 45 min
Items needed
Treibball Balls or equivalent
Goal or goal marker
Activity description

This dog sport was initially developed in Germany as an outlet for the intense herding instinct found in dog breeds that were developed for this purpose but had no access to any sort of livestock to herd. In this recently developed sport, instead of herding livestock, the dogs herd large, inflated balls to a specific place or goal. While handlers are allowed to use both hand gestures and voice commands to instruct their canine companion, they are not allowed to move out of the handler’s area once the event has begun. The balls that are used are similar to regular exercise balls that people utilize to get in shape, and these exercise balls can be employed to learn the game by choosing an exercise ball size that is at least shoulder height to your dog. Your Lancashire Heeler should find this activity to be a fun challenge that can be easily played most times of the year.

Step
1
Learn your part
The goal of Treibball is fairly simple; your canine companion is meant to move as many of the inflated balls to the goal as they can within a set time frame, usually within fifteen minutes. There are several rules that the handler will need to know to properly instruct their pooch on how to play the game. Current and updated rules for competition are accessible on the American Treibball Association website.
Step
2
Train your canine
The first step to training your Lancashire Heeler to learn the sport of treibball is to teach them to initially ignore the target until you have given them the command to start. Once your dog has mastered ignoring the ball when instructed, you can teach them to roll the ball with their nose, rather than biting at it, and how to guide it into the goal. The skills to train your dog for these steps can be learned by attending a training class that teaches treibball, but many people choose to learn by reading books and watching videos as well.
Step
3
Increase the intensity
After mastering the basics, you can increase the challenge for your dog by adding in twists to the game. Placing obstacles in between the ball and the goal, having your canine partner single out a specific ball to drive to the goal, or requiring that the balls be driven to the goal in a specific order are methods that can be used to challenge your dog’s mind and refine their abilities.
Love this activity?

Search for Supper

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Free
Easy
5 - 30 min
Items needed
Food
Bowl
Puzzle Toys (optional)
Activity description

Lancashire Heelers are known to overeat on occasion, a trait most likely passed down from both of the parent breeds. This can be particularly destructive to a long-bodied dog like this breed as it can not only lead to heart disease, respiratory illness, and joint trouble, it can also cause back problems like intervertebral disc disease. Teaching your dog to search for their supper is an easy and inexpensive way to encourage your dog to get a little more exercise as well as giving them an opportunity to use both their minds and their natural tracking skills. This activity can be particularly helpful for people who are unable to get around or get out of the house much, as it can provide exercise for the dog with minimal physical effort from the owner. 

Step
1
Getting started
Pet parents can decide to do this exercise at their dog’s normal suppertime, possibly giving the owners a few minutes peace to eat their own supper, or for the morning meal. Dogs may initially be confused as to what is going on, so it is often best to start by hiding their normal food bowl with their usual food in it, hiding it in a spot that is fairly close by and very easy to spot.
Step
2
Distance
Once your pup is automatically searching for their hidden meals, you can start making the game more difficult. One way to increase the difficulty is to move the bowl of food further from the dog’s original feeding spot, maybe even in a different room, while another is to make the hiding places themselves more difficult, such as open boxes, in closets, or even under chairs and beds. It is important not to hide the food in any spot that is considered to be off limits to your dog, such as in grocery bags or backpacks, or on surfaces that you put your own food on such as kitchen tables or counters.
Step
3
Make them move
Once your dog has mastered finding their supper in their supper bowl, you can make the game both more challenging and somewhat healthier, but splitting the meal up into multiple hiding places, either in separate bowls or in puzzle toys specifically designed to hold treats or kibble. Utilizing multiple hiding spots will help to ensure that your Lancashire Heeler gets more physical exercise as they search through the house and may help to prevent overeating as much as they are less likely to bolt their food.
Love this activity?

Barn Hunt

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Moderate
Normal
15 - 60 min
Items needed
Barn Hunt Registration
Activity description

While Lancashire Heelers were developed mainly for their herding abilities, they are also valuable as pest control dogs, hunting and killing vermin in barns and houses. Barn Hunt is a competitive sport in which small to medium-sized dogs race through hay bales in search of live rats, usually pets themselves, who are hidden throughout the course in specialized safety tubes. This sport was originally designed to allow companion dogs whose breeds were traditionally employed as pest control to showcase their talents but was later expanded to include all dogs small enough to fit through a twenty inch tall and eighteen-inch wide opening.

Step
1
Find a club
Barn hunt was first introduced to the scene in 2013 and has exploded in popularity since then. A comprehensive list of Barn Hunt clubs recognized by the official Barn Hunt Association can be found on the Barn Hunt Association website, or you may be able to find small meet up type groups by talking to local dog training and dog sports facilities.
Step
2
Dog meets rat
Many dogs that serve as companion animals have never seen a rat in their day to day lives and will need to be introduced to the safety tubes with a rat in it in order to know what to search for. The rats that are employed as bait animals for these trials are safely cocooned in their tubes, which are designed to be bite proof. They are often family pets that have been specifically conditioned to make them feel safe in their safety tube even with barking dogs right outside of it.
Step
3
Compete
While the sport of Barn Hunt is essentially competitive, there are generally several levels of competition, making this enjoyable for the Novice to the Master hunter. Before entering an official trial, many pet parents may elect to let their dog try the sport at a clinic or fun hunt. Barn Hunt registration numbers to enter actual competitions can be purchased on the Barn Hunt Association’s website for a $30 annual fee, and each competition has an entry fee of around fifteen to twenty-five dollars.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Herding

The Lancashire Heeler was developed as a herding dog, small enough to nip at the heels of cattle, but quick enough to move out of the way. While they are more likely to serve as companion animals in modern times, farms and ranches that teach herding skills and allow the rental of their land and herds for herding practice are becoming more available.

Puzzle Toys

The Lancashire Heeler has a great deal of energy and curiosity and can be quite distracting and destructive if not given enough to occupy their active minds. There are many different toys available, both store-bought and homemade, to stimulate your canine companion's mind and keep them occupied.

Conclusion

Although these small statured dogs were developed as working dogs for farm work, they also make delightful companions when given enough mental and physical exercise. They are typically friendly and playful with both adults and children but can be territorial and aggressive towards other canines without a great deal of socialization. They are usually easily trainable and eager to please, but will sometimes resort to mischievous behavior or show some stubbornness typical of terrrier dogs.