Activities For Native American Village Dogs

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Introduction

We imagine that at least a few pulses were raised the first time a Native American Village Dog was taken out for a walk around their community - with their pointed ears, thick coats, and piercing "thousand yard" stares, folks must've thought that a wolf was walking among them! In reality, the Native American Village Dog is a hybrid pup that just so happens to physically resemble a wolf more than a dog. While the Native American Village Dog's physical traits are undoubtedly lupine, this dog is genetically predisposed to act friendly and obedient to humans due to the German Shepherd and Native American Indian Dog DNA flowing through them. Native American Village Dogs were bred to act as companion and guardian animals, so introducing a member of this breed to the sorts of activities befitting a companion or guard dog will do wonders for their growth and development as a pet.

Hot Potato

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Any Day
Cheap
Easy
10 - 15 min
Items needed
Small Rubber Ball
Activity description
This is a very cheap and easy indoor activity that you can play with your dog anytime, regardless of the weather conditions. All you're really doing in this game is taking turns rolling a ball over to your dog then waiting for them to roll it back over to you. This is an absorbing game to play with dogs of all ages, yet it is simple and easy. Don't let the simplicity fool you, though. Your Native American Village Dog will learn coordination and patience, two good traits to have. Playing hot potato with your Native American Village Dog is a great way to teach young dogs the basics of obedience training while reinforcing previously learned concepts in older dogs.
Step
1
Lead by example
You'll first need to show your dog how to play the game by physically demonstrating and assisting them when the need arises. Native American Village Dogs are very attentive breeds as a whole, so you won't have to worry about them losing interest during the "slow parts" of this game. Physically roll the ball to your dog, say "hot potato" when it is near them, and then roll it back. Repeat this step a few times before moving on to step two.
Step
2
Hot potato
After having spent some time demonstrating how the game works, you'll want to test your Native American Village Dog to see if they've truly learned how to play the game; roll the ball over to your pet and say "hot potato." If they nudge the ball back over to you (or even send it back by picking it up and tossing it your way,) then congratulations! Your dog now knows how to play hot potato.
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Socialization

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Any Day
Cheap
Normal
20 - 30 min
Items needed
Leash
Treats
Activity description
Guardian dogs like Native American Village Dogs need to be socialized at an early age so that they can learn how they ought to deal with other humans and animals that they'll encounter throughout their lives. The younger you begin attempting to socialize a dog the better, so look to try this activity out with your pet within their first few months of development. You won't need to spend much cash on anything other than a reliable, comfortable leash and some treats to reward your dog for their efforts. You can socialize your dog during any type of weather conditions that you prefer as there are no optimal weather conditions to attempt this activity - these dogs love to be outside no matter the forecast!
Step
1
Socialization do's and don'ts
Do introduce your Native American Village Dog to your close friends and family members as soon as they're old enough to understand their own name. Don't let your young dog play with young children until they've learned some restraint. Do take your dog out for walks around the block while they're still a puppy. Don't let them play with pets you're not familiar with until they get a bit older.
Step
2
Round Robin recall
This socialization game will help to teach a young Native American Village Dog manners as well as help them understand the significance of the name you've given them. With a group of friends, family members, or other willing participants ready, you'll all want to form a circle around your dog while holding on to some dog treats. Everyone will then need to take turns calling your dog's name, giving them a treat when they walk up to them.
Step
3
Socialization for older dogs
Older dogs who haven't been socialized before can be much more difficult to train than young puppies but it's still possible. Try starting off by taking them for walks around the block and heeling them whenever they start getting too unruly with strangers. If all else fails, there are plenty of trainers out there who specialize in working with older dogs.
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Canicross

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Sunny Day
Moderate
Hard
1 hr
Items needed
Hands Free Dog Leash
Active Wear
Waste Bags
Activity description
The most physically exhausting activity on this guide, Canicross is not an exercise for the faint of heart. Canicross is a sport that fuses cross-country running with joring sports like Skijoring or Bikejoring. For those of you who don't know, the phrase "joring sports" refers to any activity where a person is pulled along by a dog wearing a harness. Canicross runners are less pulled along by their canine running partners and are more accurately supported by them as the two of them attempt to run a cross-country mile. You'll want to attempt this activity during a sunnier time of year for safety reasons, as it's a lot easier to run when there aren't puddles of water or mud all over the place.
Step
1
Warming up
It's going to take a bit of time to run the length of a cross-country mile. During that time, it would be a shame if you or your dog got hit with a bad case of cramps. Stretch your legs and go for a light walk to get the blood flowing. Jogging in place is a valid way to get your blood circulating, but it won't be as effective for your dog.
Step
2
Going the distance
The standard cross country mile is about 5 kilometers (or 3.1 miles for those of us who are not familiar with the metric system). Long-time runners can cross that distance in a pretty short time span but first-time runners will need to pace themselves throughout this activity to make it to the end. Notice how we haven't referred to this activity as a race? That's because it's not; move at a pace that's safe and steady for your dog. Don't worry about when you complete the run, just focus on completing it.
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More Fun Ideas...

Jump Rope

You can play this activity with just your dog or you can get a few friends in on the fun as well. The idea is to get an at least halfway decent jump rope and move it slowly enough so that your dog can time their jumps. If you and your pet keep at it for enough time, you may even be able to play double dutch with them.

Boomerang Fetch

If you're looking to tease your dog's brain while also giving them a pretty decent physical workout, then you may want to consider using a boomerang the next time the two of you play fetch together. Your dog will be pleasantly puzzled when they chase after the object you've just thrown only to see it change trajectory mid-flight! Eventually, they'll learn that boomerangs tend to fly forward then backward and they'll react accordingly.

Forest Foraging

This activity refers to the act of walking through the woods and picking out things like berries and flowers that catch your fancy. You'll want to raise your botanical IQ before trying this activity out with your dog so that you can learn fruits and berries are meant for digestion and which are meant for decoration. Don't let your dog eat anything as you forage; there are many noxious plants out there that are highly toxic to dogs.

Conclusion

Native American Village Dogs are very compassionate canines who have the heart of a hound despite heavily looking like a wolf. Their physical traits help increase their efficacy as guard dogs and livestock guardians, as would be thieves and assailants will think twice about crossing the family of a Native American Village Dog when they see that their members are being protected by a super-sized wolf! Native American Village Dogs can learn to adapt to various environments and households, but they don't tend to like small spaces all that much. If you think you can manage living with a wolf among you, then you should definitely consider adopting a Native American Village Dog.