Activities for Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dogs

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

The Romanian Miortic Shepherd Dog is huge, to say the least. Males measure up to thirty inches tall and females measure at about twenty-eight inches tall. The thickness of the hair also makes this dog breed look even bigger and fuller. This loving and loyal mountain dog is extremely disciplined, and was used and is still used as a protector of herd and livestock. The bonding to family or the master is indescribable, and this dog will gallantly protect the family and the livestock the family owns. This breed of dog also makes an excellent companion within the home, if provided with activities and exercise to enrich the dog’s herding and guarding instinct.

Find It!

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Normal
20 min
Items needed
Four or five small dog toys or balls
Activity description

When a dog is challenged to find an object, it makes the dog content. When they feel like they are working for you or for something, it stimulates their mind and body. In the game called Find It, they are challenged to find a specific object, such as a ball, several different times. It also teaches the dog to respond to commands. This fun activity can be done in any type of weather and is easily played either inside or out. Because your Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog has guarding and herding instincts, they should pick up this task pretty quickly.

Step
1
Choose the perfect toy
Collect your dog’s toys, and put about 4 or 5 in a bucket or basket. Make sure they are small enough to hide. Pick one out and focus on that particular one for a while. Give the toy a name that you will use over and over, such as “yellow ball”. Keep saying the name again and again so your dog will become familiar with it.
Step
2
Practice the task
While your dog is watching, put this object somewhere, such as under your hands. Ask your dog, “Where’s the yellow ball?” “Find it!” You will have to encourage your dog to look for it, and you will have to keep repeating the commands. It will take some time for your dog to get used to the game, but once you begin playing and over time, it may become one of your dog’s favorites! Reward each success with a pat, and this will keep your dog engaged.
Step
3
Watch your dog catch on
Once your dog finds the “yellow ball” be sure to praise him with a hug or a treat. Now, try again with another object. You can use a bone, a toy animal, or whatever you think your dog will like to find. You can keep up the game until your dog tires out. Since this dog requires a lot of thinking, your dog will become tired before you know it!
Love this activity?

Flyball

Popular
0 Votes
Sunny Day
Moderate
Hard
30 min
Items needed
Tennis Balls
Flyball Ramp
In-ground Pole
Activity description

The herding dog has a behavioral characteristic of looking and finding animals and moving them to a specific area. A variation of the timeless game of fetch is known as flyball. Of course, we all know a ball is not an animal, but a mere object that is moving as an animal would. When the dog chases the object and then brings it back, it is a version of herding behavior. In flyball, a tennis ball is inserted in a hole within the flyball ramp. The dog runs down a lane, grabs the ball after activating the spring loaded release, and brings it back. flyball is a competitive sport as well!

Step
1
Set up the course
The spring loaded ramp with a hole that holds the tennis ball can be made by you or you can purchase one online. There is also a pole that goes right in front of it. Your dog needs to be trained to run up to the ramp, get the ball, and go around the pole very quickly. Another variation of the task involves jumping a few hurdles before reaching the ball ramp. Then your herder must bring the ball back to you. You can train your dog at home, and hey! - if your dog is super swift and successful at grabbing that ball and bringing it back to you, you may have a competition dog!
Step
2
Train your dog
Without using balls, train your dog by first walking them up to the ramp and showing them how to go around the pole in front of the ramp and come back. When your dog can do this, add a ball into the hole on the ramp, and train your dog to not only run up to the ramp and circle the pole, but to also activate the spring, grab the ball and bring it back. Yes, this may take time, but it will be worth the fun.
Step
3
Take it to the next level
If you have taught your dog a command that means “go!” by using the actual word or a whistle, you are one step ahead of the game. The ultimate goal is to have your dog start from the starting point, run very fast up to the ball, grab it, then run back. You can also time your dog, as the competitive sport of flyball is timed. If both you and your pup like the excitement of the challenge, seek out a team to join.
Love this activity?

The Real Deal

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Expensive
Hard
1 hr
Items needed
Harness
Leash
Activity description

Herding dogs are great at agility, and take to training very well. If you find you have an active and intelligent herding dog, which you most likely will, you may want to try agility training. You can set up a course or go to a professional agility trainer. Many people opt for the latter because everything is already set up and ready to roll! A professional trainer can teach you how to teach your herding dog, and with the course on hand, you may choose this option. Once your dog gets really good at doing this, you can even enter your dog in agility competitions.

Step
1
Find a trainer
Look online for trainers in your area, call your local herding dog group, or ask around the dog park for recommendations for an agility trainer. It does not need to be a specific herding dog trainer, as an agility trainer trains all capable dogs. More than likely you will find a good trainer close by. If not, continue researching and you may find one within driving distance.
Step
2
Beginner training
A trainer will know just how to introduce your pup to the fun world of agility. There will be fees involved for the instruction, and specific rules and regulations to follow. Taking your dog for the training the first few times may require quite the learning curve for both you and your dog, but with time, and with the knowledge gained from your trainer, you and your pup will learn the ropes in no time!
Step
3
Work with your dog often
This is important if you have the desire and goal to compete with your dog. Not only does your dog need to learn the course, but you do as well! You will need, in most cases, to run alongside your dog to say the commands through the obstacles. This is typically done in the competition ring, too. Agility is a great way to keep both you and your clever companion in tip top shape.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

The Muffin Pan

This activity is perfect for a rainy day inside. Take twelve tennis balls and put them each in a muffin pan hole. Allow your dog to sniff and investigate the muffin pan filled with the balls. Then hide a treat under one of the tennis balls and see if your dog can sniff out the treat!

Backyard Soccer

Find five large balls and see if your dog can "herd" them up! Play with him by lightly kicking them and telling him "get the balls!"

Conclusion

If you have seen professional competitions, you may be motivated to begin training your herding dog at home in agility or flyball. Chances are you may not need to train your dog for long because of the strong instinct that is already within your dog! Give it a try and see, and remember to go step by step and before you know it, your Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog will be your champion!