Baskimo

Home > Dog Breeds > Baskimo
United States
American Eskimo
Basset Hound
The Baskimo is a hybrid mix of the Basset Hound and the American Eskimo. In appearance, this hybrid inherits a substantial amount of its looks from its Basset Hound parent, but though this hybrid’s body is slightly longer than it is tall, it is usually more compact than other Basset Hound hybrids. The coloring on the Baskimo can vary, and the length of the hair will range from medium and coarse to long and silky depending on the predominant parent. However, most Baskimos tend to resemble their Basset Hound parent.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
2000s
Ancestry
American Eskimo, Basset Hound

Baskimo Breed History

The Baskimo is a new hybrid mix for the 21st century. The Baskimo is currently recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, the Dog Registry of America, and the International Designer Canine Registry. Little is known about the current hybrid, but both the Basset Hound and the American Eskimo have colorful histories to share with the new mix. The Basset Hound hails from France where its name is most likely derived from the French word bas meaning low, as in low to the ground. The Basset Hound was probably a dwarf mutation of the modern-day Bloodhound and bred in France as a curiosity among the aristocracy. However, following the French Revolution, the Basset Hound, with his highly developed sense of smell became a favorite among the common folk as a hunting companion because people could keep up with him on foot. The Basset Hound was brought to the United States during the Colonial Period but did not gain notoriety or recognition in the American Kennel Club until 1935. Since then, this low to the ground hound has increased in popularity and even been used as the breed mascot for Hush Puppy shoes. The American Eskimo is neither American nor Eskimo and believe to be from the Northern Spitz family living in Germany as the German Spitz before coming to America in the 20th century. Anti-German sentiment following World War I and throughout the Second World War forced a name change upon the German Spitz, who affectionately became known as the American Eskimo, or Eskie. It is believed the kennel that most prominently bred the American Eskimo lent its name; the American Eskimo Kennel.

Baskimo Breed Appearance

The Baskimo usually resembles the Basset Hound in coloring and coat style and will have short, coarse hair. However, some Baskimos can resemble their American Eskimo parent. The head on a Baskimo is round and has a long muzzle set with large, almond shaped eyes that can appear sad. The ears on a Baskimo are large and floppy, like the Basset Hound. Unlike other Basset Hound hybrids, the Baskimo is not as exaggerated in body length thanks to the compact size of the American Eskimo. Her legs will also range from short and sturdy Basset Hound style to a slightly more delicate short look. Nonetheless, the Baskimo is a low to the ground hybrid.

Baskimo Breed Maintenance

Having risen from two non-hypoallergenic breeds, the Baskimo is not hypoallergenic and is considered an average shedder. Depending on which parent this hybrid’s coat mostly resembles, you may have to brush them more than once a week. Otherwise, weekly brushing with a stiff brush and a hound mitt will help remove the dead and loose hair and keep your Baskimo looking and smelling lovely. These dogs are not known to develop a “doggy” odor, but regular brushing will help clean and distribute the Baskimo’s natural oils. While brushing your Baskimo’s coat, also check the ears and remove any built-up wax, dirt, or debris using a veterinarian approved cleaning solution. The Baskimo may develop ear infections due to its Basset Hound parent’s floppy ear style.

Baskimo Activity Requirements

The Baskimo is a friendly and intelligent hybrid who is eager to please, thanks to the American Eskimo parent. Any stubbornness you find in your Baskimo is sure to come from the Basset Hound parent, but the Baskimo is considered an outgoing, loving, and easy to train hybrid. When it comes to children, the Baskimo is a remarkable patient and loving companion. The sturdy nature of the hybrid allows it to stand up to everyday child interactions but teaching your kids to respect and take care of their dog is equally important. The Baskimo gets along very well with other dogs, especially given the pack-minded traits of the Basset Hound. The American Eskimo softens this hybrid for non-canine companionship, such as with cats. The Baskimo may be slightly leery of strangers, but early socialization will help develop their friendliness towards unknown, non-threaten people. Energy levels in the Baskimo tend to follow that of the Basset Hound parent and will be lower with less intensity. However, these easy to train, eager to please hybrids still need their daily exercise to keep their minds sharp and bodies healthy.

Baskimo Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd