Skip-Shzu

Home > Dog Breeds > Skip-Shzu
10-15 lbs
10-13"
United States
Schipperke
Shih Tzu
The Skip-Shzu is a rare hybrid of the purebred Schipperke and Shih Tzu.  Despite its rarity, the Skip-Shzu is recognized by five different breed registries including the Designer Breed Registry and its international sister registry, the International Designer Canine Registry.  Additionally, the Skip-Shzu is recognized by the Dog Registry of America, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, and the American Canine Hybrid Club.  The Skip-Shzu tends to be an active hybrid and needs plenty of exercise to lead a happy, healthy life.  They also have a long lifespan, ranging between 15 and 18 years and are considered a healthy hybrid.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Schipperke and Shih Tzu

Skip-Shzu Health

Average Size
Male Skip-Shzu size stats
Height: 10-13 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Female Skip-Shzu size stats
Height: 10-13 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip Dysplasia
Minor Concerns
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Hypothyroidism
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Elbow Dysplasia
Occasional Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Radiographs
  • Complete Physical Examination

Skip-Shzu Breed History

The Skip-Shzu is a hybrid of the Schipperke and Shih Tzu with little history.  Designer dogs, unless overly popular, do not have much history, which is due in part to their recent rise as breeds.  Historical accounts are also lacking because breeding standards are not yet developed for most hybrids.  Owners who wish to understand more about their Skip-Shzu can overcome the lack of detailed histories by learning about the respective histories and traits of the parent breeds. The Schipperke is a small dog, developed in Belgium, with a long history.  The breed developed from the Belgium Sheepdog, a member of the Spitz family, and is sometimes referred to as "Dutch Dog," though the breed has no ties to the Netherlands.  The Schipperke was first bred as a small watchdog for the wharves and canals between Antwerp and Brussels and gains its name from its position as a vermin control and watchdog.  The name Schipperke is Flemish for Little Captain, and despite their size, these small dogs are tenacious and feisty protectors that became popular at court when Queen Maria Henrietta first saw the breed at a dog show in 1885.  Shortly after the breed was discovered, it was imported the United States, and the first Schipperke Club was founded in 1905.  The American Kennel Club then recognized the breed in 1929, and today the Schipperke is considered a moderately popular dog but by no means rare. The Shih Tzu is a small, ancient breed from China.  Archaeological evidence in the Chinese region suggests the Shih Tzu may be as old or older than 10,000 years.  Much of the ancient history, as well as the recent history, of the Shih Tzu, is shrouded in mystery because the Chinese maintained strict breeding practices that were well-guarded.  The West did not learn about the Shih Tzu until trade routes opened in China.  The Shih Tzu's popularity increased in the Chinese Imperial court with the Empress T'zu Hsi's reign.  The Empress was gifted a pair of fine Shih Tzu's from the Dali Lama, and she maintained a pack of the small dogs during her lifetime.  Upon her death, the Chinese noble families competed to produce a superior life of Shih Tzu's.  The breeding practices were, once again, kept highly secretive and only the finest specimens were kept for breeding.  All other dogs were sold at market.  Some superior dogs were later taken out of the country and brought to England where the West had an opportunity to breed the dogs.  The Shih Tzu was imported to the United States in the 20th Century but was not recognized by the American Kennel Club until 1969.  Once in the United States, the popularity of the Shih Tzu soared and today, the breed is ranked in the top 20 of most popular breeds.

Skip-Shzu Breed Appearance

The Skip-Shzu is a small dog, not standing more than 13 inches when fully grown.  They typically have round heads with shorter muzzles and round dark brown eyes.  The Skip-Shzu's ears are small and triangular-shaped that may stand on end or flop over slightly.  The Skip-Shzu's coat is soft and usually black but may have white or cream on its chest.  The legs are thin and straight and support a quick-paced gait.  The Skip-Shzu's tail is heavily plumed and curls over the back.
Eye Color Possibilities
brown Skip-Shzu eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Skip-Shzu nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
white Skip-Shzu coat
White
red Skip-Shzu coat
Red
cream Skip-Shzu coat
Cream
brown Skip-Shzu coat
Brown
black Skip-Shzu coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Skip-Shzu straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Skip-Shzu Breed Maintenance

The Skip-Shzu is considered a moderate shedding dog and requires daily brushing to keeps its gorgeous coat free of tangles and soft.  Daily brushing will also help reduce the amount of loose and dead hair on the Skip-Shzu.  The Shih Tzu parent increases the chances of the Skip-Shzu having dental issues.  Owners can reduce potential dental disease by brushing their Skip-Shzu's teeth three times weekly.  The Skip-Shzu is not known to drool or have a doggy smell; however, grooming and teeth cleaning will ensure a fresh smelling dog with a healthy coat and mouth.  It is also possible that the Skip-Shzu may have hypoallergenic qualities, thanks to the Shih Tzu parent's genes.  

Brushes for Skip-Shzu
Pin Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Skip-Shzu requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Skip-Shzu Temperament

The Skip-Shzu is a moderately energetic hybrid with a feisty disposition.  They are affectionate with their families and enjoy a good lap and settle down quickly.  For small companion dogs, the Skip-Shzu does well on its own but should not be left alone long.  The Skip-Shzu is fond of children, but its size and sometimes feisty nature may not make this dog well-suited for small children who may tease or accidentally hurt it during playtime.  The Skip-Shzu, despite its small size, makes for an excellent watchdog and it will alert its owners to approaching strangers.  Otherwise, the Skip-Shzu is a relatively quiet dog.  The Skip-Shzu is curious with strangers and will warm up to new people once they feel there is no danger.  The Skip-Shzu is an intelligent dog but is somewhat stubborn.  This makes the hybrid more difficult to train, and this designer dog is not recommended for novice dog owners who cannot dedicate time and patience to training and exercise.      

Skip-Shzu Activity Requirements

The Skip-Shzu is an energetic dog with moderate exercise needs.  The Shih Tzu parent helps soften the intensity of physical activity, but both parents also have active minds that must stay engaged to prevent negative behaviors from developing.  The Skip-Shzu needs daily exercise that stimulates their bodies and minds, which will also help strengthen the bond between owners and their dogs.  They are small and can much of its exercise indoors and makes for a good apartment dog.  The Skip-Shzu has a slightly higher tolerance for cold weather than warm but prefers temperate climates.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
7 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
20 minutes

Skip-Shzu Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$25 - $30

Skip-Shzu Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Skip-Shzu size stats at six months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 11 lbs
Female Skip-Shzu size stats at six months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 11 lbs
12 Months
Male Skip-Shzu size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs
Female Skip-Shzu size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs
18 Months
Male Skip-Shzu size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs
Female Skip-Shzu size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs

Skip-Shzu Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd