Bassugg

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12-15 lbs
10-14"
United States
Pugglehound

The Bassugg is a mix between the Basset Hound and the Pug. This small to medium dog is one that has a more Basset Hound appearance, with a few distinguishing Pug traits. He is extremely low maintenance with an even-tempered personality, and would like nothing more than to snuggle the day away by your side! This makes the Bassugg an excellent family dog and is great for anyone looking for their first pet. If an elderly person would like to still take care of a dog, the Bassugg may be the perfect choice as they are laid back and gentle, yet still active enough to keep retirees active and entertained. While this breed can be easy to train, they still carry a stubborn streak over from the Basset Hound side. Don’t worry though, both parent breeds are very intelligent and this has been passed down to your Bassugg; with consistency, patience, and rewards, he will catch on in no time. Keep in mind that because both the Basset Hound and the Pug have short fur, your Bassugg will not do well in low temperatures. Keep him inside when the temperature drops and when it rises, keep walks and other activities to a minimum in order to avoid overheating.

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Basset Hound, Pug

Bassugg Health

Average Size
Height: 10-14 inches Weight: 12-15 lbs
Height: 10-14 inches Weight: 12-15 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Seborrhea
  • Elbow
  • Obesity
  • Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
Minor Concerns
  • Cherry Eye
  • Glaucoma
  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Brachycephalic Syndrome
  • Sick Sinus Syndrome
  • Cervical Vertebral Instability
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Elbow
  • Spine
  • Skin Scraping
  • X-Rays

Bassugg Breed History

Because the Bassugg is a relatively new breed, we don’t know much about where their history starts. We do, however, know quite a bit about the parent breeds. The Pug, for instance, originated in China and was brought over to Holland by Portuguese traders in the 16th century. This wrinkly little breed eventually became very popular in royal courts and made its way into the hearts of England royalty when Dutch traders brought Pugs into the country around the year 1689. The American Kennel Club started to recognize the breed in 1889 and the Pug has grown in popularity ever since, most likely due to its small size and big yet loving personality. The Basset Hound has a much more unfamiliar beginning and was most likely developed around the 7th century in France. This breed was created to be a hunting dog with a great nose and a loud howl that could alert their owner to hidden prey. Their laid back personalities and soulful eyes give them quite a bit of character and when they came to the United States in the early 19th century, their popularity grew due to the breed being used in a Hush Puppy shoes ad campaign. The Basset Hound is still used today as a hunting dog and faithful companion. When combining these two parent breeds, we end up with the Bassugg, a snuggly and loyal dog that is relatively easy to train. They aren’t very tolerant to cold due to their short coats, so the Bassugg would prefer a warmer climate and to be kept indoors when the temperature drops.

Bassugg Breed Appearance

Since the Bassugg is a hybrid breed, he will take on a combination of traits from both of his parents breeds: the Basset Hound and the Pug. Because of this combination, it is difficult to pinpoint exactly what each litter’s appearance and personality will be like. However, the average look for a Bassugg is a long body that is low to the ground with short legs. This is because both parent breeds have short legs and neither is very large. The ears of the Bassugg have the same shape and floppy quality of the Basset Hound, yet they are much shorter, ending around the bottom of the eye line or in line with the jaw. Their short and silky fur is usually a mix of tan, white, and black and their large eyes are a dark brown. While the Basset Hound is very wrinkly around the face, the Pug is only slightly wrinkly, so the Bassugg may have gently wrinkles around the eyes and droopy lips, but nothing too extreme. The Pug has a very smashed in muzzle, but the Bassugg tends to take after his Basset Hound side and has a longer muzzle with a black nose. Due to the fact that both parent breeds have short fur that sheds frequently throughout the year, it comes as no surprise that the Bassugg follows in those paw-steps. While his fur does shed often, this is a relatively low maintenance breed that is easy upkeep for any level of dog owner. 

Bassugg Breed Maintenance

 The Bassugg is a relatively easy dog to maintain, however there are a few things to keep in mind. Because both parents have loose and wrinkled skin, the Bassugg has folds on his face that will need to be cleaned often. Depending on how many wrinkles your dog has will determine how often you need to clean them; it may be daily or only weekly. Carefully wipe out the wrinkles so that they are nice and clean. This can be done during bathing, which only needs to be done occasionally, or more often if needed. Be prepared for shedding as both the Pug and the Basset Hound tend to shed quite a bit. You can brush away the loose fur and any dirt of the body with a rubber brush at least a couple times a week to keep the shedding to a minimum. Besides brushing and bathing, be sure to clean your Bassugg’s ears often. This is because due to this breed having folded over ears, moisture and any foreign objects trapped inside can cause infection and irritation. Frequent cleanings and thorough drying of the ears after a bath will help to decrease this chance. Clip your dog’s nails every couple of weeks of whenever you hear the nails clicking against the ground in order to keep the feet healthy. 

Bassugg Temperament

If you are looking for a dog that loves to cuddle and basically thinks he’s a teddy bear, then the Bassugg may be the perfect dog for you! With a laid-back, gentle, and friendly disposition, this breed is wonderful for people of all ages; including children and strangers. On top of this, the Bassugg is a great dog to consider if you already have other pets, as he gets on wonderfully with other animals. While this breed can sometimes be mischievous, especially when bored, they are very easy to train and want to please their owners. This most likely comes from the Pug side considering that the Basset Hound tends to have a stubborn streak that can make him slightly difficult to train (housebreaking especially). If you have issues housebreaking your Bassugg, don’t get discouraged. This breed can be a bit slow in that department but with patience and practice, they will catch on eventually. Due to their desire to please, the Bassugg makes a wonderful dog for the elderly, first time dog owners, and anyone who wants a fun and playful pet that can also cuddle you away to sleep as well. They also aren’t known to bark often, which makes them fantastic for apartments or areas where you don’t want to disturb any neighbors. 

Bassugg Activity Requirements

Even though the parent breeds of the Bassugg are not necessarily high energy, they do need a certain amount of exercise to keep them in shape and happy. The Bassugg is very low maintenance and will be happy with a brisk walk or a quick game of fetch out in the yard. Because both the Basset Hound and the Pug are known for a being a little bit lazy, it is important to keep your Bassugg’s mind engaged either through new toys or by switching up his walk routine. This will keep things interesting and fun for your dog and make playtime much more rewarding.  This breed does very well in cities and small buildings such as apartments because they don’t require much exercise time or room to run around in. 

Bassugg Owner Experiences